Called into Community: Vocation, Engagement, and Difference

2022 NetVUE Conference 3/24/2022 3/24/2022 3/24/20223/26/20223/26/20223/26/2022 Sheraton Dallas Hotel Dallas, TX
No

About the Conference

The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) is pleased to invite teams of campus leaders to the sixth national conference of the Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE), which will be held March 24−26, 2022, at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel in Dallas, Texas. NetVUE is a nationwide campus-supported network administered by CIC that fosters vocational exploration and discernment among college and university students.

Under the theme “Called into Community: Vocation, Engagement, and  Difference,” the 2022 NetVUE Conference will examine how attention to vocation and calling can draw us into deep engagement with the needs of the world, meaningful reflection on difference, and more sustained attention to the ways that these issues shape how we, and our students, think about our future directions in life. The conference will explore engagement and difference through various lenses: theological reflection across faith traditions, initiatives to develop future professional and civic leaders, and inquiries into issues of justice, inclusion, and the common good.

An array of distinguished speakers will address such topics as the call to be agents of change, the resilience of religion in higher education, and the importance of engaging with texts across traditions. Concurrent sessions will address issues of interest to NetVUE member institutions and offer opportunities to exchange ideas about vocational exploration in theory and practice. Campus teams are also invited to propose their own sessions on topics of interest to the larger membership. The entire conference is designed to provide participants with a wide range of resources to sustain and broaden the work of vocational reflection—in the classroom, the advising process, career development, campus ministry, community engagement, and other spheres of undergraduate life. Participants will also have opportunities to network with colleagues in similar roles at other institutions.

Each NetVUE member college and university is invited to designate a three- to five-person campus team, led by the president, chief academic officer, or another officer at the vice-presidential level. The team should include others who play key roles in helping undergraduates consider their vocations in relation to personal development, educational plans, and postgraduate choices. Campus representatives may include faculty members, academic affairs staff, student life staff, chaplains, vocation program directors, career services advisors, and others whose portfolios include helping students to consider their many callings in life.

Thanks to member dues and generous support from Lilly Endowment Inc., the registration fee of $950, which includes the costs of accommodation, all conference meals, and program materials, will be waived for three team members of NetVUE institutions. Additional team members—up to five total—may register at the institution’s expense. Participating institutions will be responsible for covering travel expenses for all team members; however, a limited number of travel grants are available in special circumstances.

While all NetVUE members are invited to participate, early registration is encouraged, as space is limited. Conference registrations received after January 31, 2022, will be accommodated only on a space-available basis.

The Council of Independent Colleges gratefully acknowledges the generous support of NetVUE by Lilly Endowment Inc.

Participating in Your First NetVUE Conference?

If this is your first NetVUE Conference, you are not alone! Over the course of NetVUE’s history, approximately half of the participants in each biennial conference have been new to the network, or at least new to the event. The conference is known for the energy of its participants and an extremely full program, so first-time participants are strongly encouraged to arrive by midday on Thursday in order to participate in a special orientation session. New participants will be introduced to the network, its staff, and its programs and services. This session will offer guidance for approaching the NetVUE Conference and bringing its insights home to campus. It also will provide an excellent opportunity for newcomers to get to know others. Please join us at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 24, for this important orientation session.

Health and Safety

CIC and NetVUE are committed to the health and safety of those who work at their member institutions, as well as the communities to which these individuals belong. CIC is working closely with hotel staff at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel to ensure that all industry-standard cleaning and hygiene protocols will be met or exceeded throughout the NetVUE Conference.

To create the safest possible environment while offering meaningful opportunities for interaction, CIC expects that all participants who are able to receive the COVID-19 vaccine will be fully vaccinated at least two weeks before arriving at the conference. Please expect to be asked to attest to your vaccination status when you register online; closer to the conference, you will be asked to submit verification. If you have been unable to receive the vaccine for any reason, please speak to a staff member to complete your registration.

Participants are expected to contribute to creating a safe event by respecting all national, local, and venue-specific health guidelines that may be in effect when the NetVUE Conference takes place. Updated information reflecting the most recent available guidance will be issued shortly before the event. By attending, participants agree to support their colleagues and communities by complying with public health recommendations that are in effect during the conference, as well as with the CIC Code of Conduct.

About NetVUE

The Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) is a nationwide association of more than 270 colleges and universities administered by CIC that supports students in the work of vocational exploration and discernment. Through national conferences and regional gatherings, faculty seminars and scholarly resources, campus visit and consulting programs, and a wide range of grant initiatives, NetVUE encourages member institutions to develop and extend vocation-related conversations and programming on their campuses. NetVUE is supported by member dues and by the generosity of Lilly Endowment Inc. An Advisory Council composed of representatives from member institutions guides CIC in the administration of NetVUE.

Biennial national conferences of NetVUE have been held since 2011, with the 2019 NetVUE Conference bringing together nearly 700 campus leaders from about 200 colleges and universities. NetVUE member institutions, most of which are rooted in the liberal arts, represent a wide range of religiously-affiliated institutions as well as many without specific religious ties. They are united by their commitment to strengthen and deepen vocational exploration and discernment on their campuses, both in the classroom and in other areas of student life.

View additional information about NetVUE, including its purposes, progams, and services.


Not Yet a Member of NetVUE?

CIC welcomes the participation of additional independent colleges and universities in NetVUE. Institutions that join NetVUE gain access to a wide array of resources, programs, and services, and are immediately eligible to send a three-person team to the NetVUE Conference with all costs waived for registration, lodging, and meals. View additional information about NetVUE membership, including an application to join. Please complete the membership application prior to submitting conference registration. For questions about NetVUE, please contact David S. Cunningham, director of NetVUE, at dcunningham@cic.nche.edu or (616) 395-6750.

Featured Speakers

 

 

  • Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.
    Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.
    Princeton University
  • Nicholas Adams
    Nicholas Adams
    University of Birmingham
  • Kathleen A. Mahoney
    Kathleen A. Mahoney
    GHR Foundation

Preliminary Schedule

 

 

Concurrent Campus PresentationsConcurrent Campus Presentations36Concurrent Session<p>During this time, conference participants will be able to choose from among a number of presentations led by NetVUE member institutions. Additional information about proposing a campus session is available below, in the section titled Call for Proposals.</p>
Small Group Discussions by Institutional Size and TypeSmall Group Discussions by Institutional Size and Type3On Thursday afternoon and during Friday’s lunch, participants will meet in pre-designated small groups, designed to create new relationships among those who share various commonalities but who might not yet have met. Friday and Saturday breakfast sessions also will provide opportunities for discussions about specific topics related to vocation and calling. The primary purpose of these conversations is to compare and contrast approaches to vocational reflection and discernment and to consider how vocation-related initiatives can be sustained over time.
Pre-Conference Workshops ContinuePre-Conference Workshops Continue33Workshop<span><span></span></span><span><span>These workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. Registration is open to anyone also registered for the NetVUE Conference. If you have already registered and would like to add a pre- or post-conference workshop to an existing registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.nche.edu">ttruscott@cic.nche.edu</a>.<br><br> These events begin on Wednesday, March 23, at 1:00 p.m. and conclude with lunch on Thursday, March 24. The price for either workshop is $400 and includes Wednesday dinner, Thursday breakfast and lunch, and overnight accommodations at the conference hotel.</span></span><br><br> <h4>Bringing Vocation into the Classroom</h4>One of the most promising ways that faculty members can serve their students is to introduce them to the subject of vocation. Faculty members have the opportunity to guide students in the exploration of their respective vocations; to help them prove questions of meaning, purpose, and identity; and to consider the contributions that they can make to society—and to do so from a variety of perspectives, including the theological and the ethical.<br><br>This pre-conference workshop aims to strengthen the teaching of vocational exploration by considering content and teaching methods for courses that focus on vocational exploration. Discussions also will focus on how social, cultural, and institutional dynamics both facilitate and hinder living out one’s vocation. In preparation for the workshop, participants will be expected to read selected materials on vocation and submit a brief written reflection. They can expect to leave the workshop with concrete plans for a new or redesigned course or course materials that will incorporate vocational exploration into the classroom.<br><br>(Note: Each summer, NetVUE offers a weeklong faculty seminar, Teaching Vocational Exploration, that covers these topics and many more. That event, however, is limited to early- and mid- career faculty who are nominated by their chief academic officer, with priority given to nominees from institutions that have not yet participated in the seminar. By contrast, this workshop is open to all faculty members at NetVUE institutions on a first-come, first-served basis. The workshop is strictly limited to 16 participants.)<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Darby K. Ray</em></strong>, Donald W. and Ann M. Harward Professor of Civic Engagement and Professor of Religious Studies, Bates College<br><strong><em>Paul J. Wadell</em></strong>, Professor Emeritus of Theology and Religious Studies, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>Vocation and Career: Helping Students Ask the Right Questions</h4>As they enter college, students often find themselves in an unfamiliar place, surrounded by people they have never met who regularly ask some rather probing questions: What you are going to study? What kind of job are you planning to get when you graduate? Where will you live, and with whom? What kind of life will you have as a result?<br><br>Faced with a barrage of challenging questions about their future lives, undergraduate students need the opportunity to develop a clear vision of themselves and their experiences, interests, and skills. They prosper when they are relieved of some of the pressure that they feel to find the “one thing” they are supposed to do (and are often desperate to discover). They need to be given the time and space to explore the multitude of paths that lead to a life of meaning and purpose.<br> <br>This pre-conference workshop is intended to help college and university professionals guide students in asking the right questions. Through presentations and interactive conversations, it will challenge participants to think more holistically about their own callings and will equip them to help students do the same, using such tools as easy-to-access online assessments and reflective exercises designed specifically for undergraduates. The workshop will be of particular interest to those who work in career services, student advisors and supervisors, faculty members, and anyone else who engages students in deep questions about the meaning of life, the role of faith, and their hopes (and fears) about the future. Participants will leave the workshop with a range of resources for guiding vocational conversations in a productive and encouraging way.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lisa Hinkley</em></strong>, Associate Vice President and Executive Director for Career and Professional Development, Carthage College<br><strong><em>Dee Pierce</em></strong>, Director, Center for Vocation and Career, Wheaton College (IL)</blockquote>
Concurrent Campus PresentationsConcurrent Campus Presentations38Concurrent Session<p>During this time, conference participants will be able to choose from among a number of presentations led by NetVUE member institutions. Additional information about proposing a campus session is available below, in the section titled Call for Proposals.</p>
Breakfast Roundtable DiscussionsBreakfast Roundtable Discussions5Breakfast is provided for all registered Conference participants. Several tables are designated for participants who wish to join colleagues to discuss specific topics. Two additional discussions will be held in separate rooms to accommodate larger numbers of participants.<br><br> <h3>Best Practices for NetVUE Campus Contacts</h3>This roundtable session provides gathering time for those currently serving as NetVUE Campus Contacts, as well as those who might be willing to take on that role in the future. NetVUE staff will offer advice on how to make the most of this important role as point of contact for member campuses. Participants will be encouraged to describe best practices and to offer feedback on how the NetVUE staff might improve communication with, and provide better support for, those who serve as Campus Contacts. <br><em>(Note: This session will be offered on both Friday and Saturday mornings.)</em><br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>David S. Cunningham</em></strong>, Director of NetVUE, CIC<br><strong><em>Lynne M. Spoelhof</em></strong>, NetVUE Program Manager, CIC<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Developing an Application for a NetVUE Grant</h3>This session will begin with a brief presentation on the array of NetVUE grants that will be offered in the coming year. Participants can check on their institution’s eligibility for various programs (whether in this year or a future year). They also can ask questions about developing conversations on campus in preparation for applying for a grant, as well as application procedures and best practices for successful grant administration. This session also will include a brief preview of what programs will be introduced as the result of a new award to CIC from the Lilly Endowment. <br><em>(Note: This session will be offered on both Friday and Saturday mornings.)</em><br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, CIC <br><strong><em>Lynn Hunnicutt</em></strong>, Assistant Director of NetVUE, CIC</blockquote>
Presidents ForumPresidents Forum36Presidents and chief academic officers are invited to take part in candid conversations regarding changing institutional contexts and approaches to broaden and sustain vocational exploration initiatives while attending to institutional mission and resources. Presidents will gather on Friday morning and chief academic officers on Saturday morning for these discussions. In each case, two NetVUE member leaders in these roles will facilitate the discussion.
Orientation Session for Those New to NetVUEOrientation Session for Those New to NetVUE21<p>​If this is your first NetVUE Conference, you are not alone! Over the course of NetVUE’s history, approximately half of the participants in each biennial conference have been new to the network, or at least new to the event. The conference is known for the energy of its participants and an extremely full program, so first-time participants are strongly encouraged to arrive by midday on Thursday in order to participate in a special orientation session. New participants will be introduced to the network, its staff, and its programs and services. This session will offer guidance for approaching the NetVUE Conference and bringing its insights home to campus. It also will provide an excellent opportunity for newcomers to get to know others. Please join us at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 24, for this important orientation session.</p>
Meetings of Organizational Members and Affinity GroupsMeetings of Organizational Members and Affinity Groups33<h3>ASSOCIATION OF PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES</h3>Will host a retreat for presidents from Tuesday, March 22, through the morning of Thursday, March 24, at the HALL Arts Hotel, located two blocks from the Sheraton Dallas Hotel. Presbyterian chaplains are tentatively scheduled to join the retreat for a joint session that will take place on Thursday, March 24, at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities</blockquote>
Chief Academic Officers ForumChief Academic Officers Forum38Presidents and chief academic officers are invited to take part in candid conversations regarding changing institutional contexts and approaches to broaden and sustain vocational exploration initiatives while attending to institutional mission and resources. Presidents will gather on Friday morning and chief academic officers on Saturday morning for these discussions. In each case, two NetVUE member leaders in these roles will facilitate the discussion.
Breakfast for Pre-Conference Workshop Participants and Affinity GroupsBreakfast for Pre-Conference Workshop Participants and Affinity Groups32
Networking and Refreshment BreakNetworking and Refreshment Break17
Lunch by Campus RoleLunch by Campus Role9On Thursday afternoon and during Friday’s lunch, participants will meet in pre-designated small groups, designed to create new relationships among those who share various commonalities but who might not yet have met. Friday and Saturday breakfast sessions also will provide opportunities for discussions about specific topics related to vocation and calling. The primary purpose of these conversations is to compare and contrast approaches to vocational reflection and discernment and to consider how vocation-related initiatives can be sustained over time.
Pre-Conference WorkshopsPre-Conference Workshops43WorkshopThese workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. Registration is open to anyone also registered for the NetVUE Conference. If you have already registered and would like to add a pre- or post-conference workshop to an existing registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.nche.edu">ttruscott@cic.nche.edu</a>.<br><br> These events begin on Wednesday, March 23, at 1:00 p.m. and conclude with lunch on Thursday, March 24. The price for either workshop is $400 and includes Wednesday dinner, Thursday breakfast and lunch, and overnight accommodations at the conference hotel.<br><br> <h4>Bringing Vocation into the Classroom</h4>One of the most promising ways that faculty members can serve their students is to introduce them to the subject of vocation. Faculty members have the opportunity to guide students in the exploration of their respective vocations; to help them prove questions of meaning, purpose, and identity; and to consider the contributions that they can make to society—and to do so from a variety of perspectives, including the theological and the ethical.<br><br>This pre-conference workshop aims to strengthen the teaching of vocational exploration by considering content and teaching methods for courses that focus on vocational exploration. Discussions also will focus on how social, cultural, and institutional dynamics both facilitate and hinder living out one’s vocation. In preparation for the workshop, participants will be expected to read selected materials on vocation and submit a brief written reflection. They can expect to leave the workshop with concrete plans for a new or redesigned course or course materials that will incorporate vocational exploration into the classroom.<br><br>(Note: Each summer, NetVUE offers a weeklong faculty seminar, Teaching Vocational Exploration, that covers these topics and many more. That event, however, is limited to early- and mid- career faculty who are nominated by their chief academic officer, with priority given to nominees from institutions that have not yet participated in the seminar. By contrast, this workshop is open to all faculty members at NetVUE institutions on a first-come, first-served basis. The workshop is strictly limited to 16 participants.)<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Darby K. Ray</em></strong>, Donald W. and Ann M. Harward Professor of Civic Engagement and Professor of Religious Studies, Bates College<br><strong><em>Paul J. Wadell</em></strong>, Professor Emeritus of Theology and Religious Studies, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>Vocation and Career: Helping Students Ask the Right Questions</h4>As they enter college, students often find themselves in an unfamiliar place, surrounded by people they have never met who regularly ask some rather probing questions: What you are going to study? What kind of job are you planning to get when you graduate? Where will you live, and with whom? What kind of life will you have as a result?<br><br>Faced with a barrage of challenging questions about their future lives, undergraduate students need the opportunity to develop a clear vision of themselves and their experiences, interests, and skills. They prosper when they are relieved of some of the pressure that they feel to find the “one thing” they are supposed to do (and are often desperate to discover). They need to be given the time and space to explore the multitude of paths that lead to a life of meaning and purpose.<br> <br>This pre-conference workshop is intended to help college and university professionals guide students in asking the right questions. Through presentations and interactive conversations, it will challenge participants to think more holistically about their own callings and will equip them to help students do the same, using such tools as easy-to-access online assessments and reflective exercises designed specifically for undergraduates. The workshop will be of particular interest to those who work in career services, student advisors and supervisors, faculty members, and anyone else who engages students in deep questions about the meaning of life, the role of faith, and their hopes (and fears) about the future. Participants will leave the workshop with a range of resources for guiding vocational conversations in a productive and encouraging way.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Lisa Hinkley</em></strong>, Associate Vice President and Executive Director for Career and Professional Development, Carthage College<br><strong><em>Dee Pierce</em></strong>, Director, Center for Vocation and Career, Wheaton College (IL)</blockquote>
Business Meeting of NetVUE MembersBusiness Meeting of NetVUE Members11
Networking ReceptionNetworking Reception12
Dinner on Your OwnDinner on Your Own13
Breakfast Roundtable DiscussionsBreakfast Roundtable Discussions14Breakfast is provided for all registered Conference participants. Several tables are designated for participants who wish to join colleagues to discuss specific topics. Two additional discussions will be held in separate rooms to accommodate larger numbers of participants.<br><br> <h3>Best Practices for NetVUE Campus Contacts</h3>This roundtable session provides gathering time for those currently serving as NetVUE Campus Contacts, as well as those who might be willing to take on that role in the future. NetVUE staff will offer advice on how to make the most of this important role as point of contact for member campuses. Participants will be encouraged to describe best practices and to offer feedback on how the NetVUE staff might improve communication with, and provide better support for, those who serve as Campus Contacts. <br><em>(Note: This session will be offered on both Friday and Saturday mornings.)</em><br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>David S. Cunningham</em></strong>, Director of NetVUE, CIC<br><strong><em>Lynne M. Spoelhof</em></strong>, NetVUE Program Manager, CIC<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Developing an Application for a NetVUE Grant</h3>This session will begin with a brief presentation on the array of NetVUE grants that will be offered in the coming year. Participants can check on their institution’s eligibility for various programs (whether in this year or a future year). They also can ask questions about developing conversations on campus in preparation for applying for a grant, as well as application procedures and best practices for successful grant administration. This session also will include a brief preview of what programs will be introduced as the result of a new award to CIC from the Lilly Endowment. <br><em>(Note: This session will be offered on both Friday and Saturday mornings.)</em><br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, CIC <br><strong><em>Lynn Hunnicutt</em></strong>, Assistant Director of NetVUE, CIC</blockquote>
Opportunities for Worship (Optional)Opportunities for Worship (Optional)25
Concurrent Campus PresentationsConcurrent Campus Presentations27Concurrent Session<p>During this time, conference participants will be able to choose from among a number of presentations led by NetVUE member institutions. Additional information about proposing a campus session is available below, in the section titled Call for Proposals.</p>
Networking and Refreshment BreakNetworking and Refreshment Break26
Bobby Fong Memorial Keynote Address: Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.Bobby Fong Memorial Keynote Address: Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.2Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.Plenary Session <em>The keynote address is offered in memory of Bobby Fong (1950–2014), who was president of Ursinus College and Butler University and played a key role in the founding of NetVUE.</em><br><br> <h3>THE PARADOX OF EDUCATION AND THE CALL TO BE AGENTS OF CHANGE</h3><p>In 1963, James Baldwin delivered his famous “A Talk to Teachers” (originally, “The Negro Child—His Self-Image”) to an audience of educators. His words are still relevant to the educational environment of today, which is being called to address generational poverty, inequity, and institutional racism—what Baldwin called being “born in the shadow of the stars and stripes.” Baldwin spoke of “the paradox of education”: that education is designed to socialize one into the basic structure of society as it is, yet it is also designed to make students into critical thinkers. What does that contradiction mean to Black and Brown college students who are observing the ugliness in the worlds from which many of them come? How does this paradox shape their process of discernment of their own callings, and those of their peers of all races, to address the needs and hopes of those worlds? How are we, as educators, being called to create an environment that refuses to socialize students into the structures of inequity and oppression, instead preparing them to expose, criticize, and change those structures? This is a time for educators, whom Baldwin called “those who deal with the minds and hearts of young people,” to become agents for societal change—and to help students discern their own paths for doing so as well.</p>
Closing Plenary Address: Kathleen A. MahoneyClosing Plenary Address: Kathleen A. Mahoney18Kathleen A. MahoneyPlenary Session<h3>THE RESILIENCE OF RELIGION AND THE ROLE OF VOCATION</h3><p>Higher education has long been considered a bellwether of secularization. Commentators have largely accepted the prognosis that the once vibrant ties between the church and the academy, and more broadly between religion and higher learning, have frayed—propelling the American campus toward a wholly secular future. Such a shift would seem to have significant implications for issues surrounding vocation and calling, since these issues are often (even if not always or necessarily) intertwined with questions of religious faith. But the prevailing view of higher education’s secular shift has been upended with new research documenting the vitality of religion on many American campuses. Religion has staged a comeback at colleges and universities—even if this change has been uneven and complex, with growing attention to the sacred and to spirituality (and a much broader awareness of religious pluralism). How will vocation- related programs address these changes, in light of their own secular and religious commitments? How will the differing assumptions of faculty members, staff, and students affect this work? The resilience of religion in higher education has significant implications for those who are charged with guiding students as they explore their many callings in life.</p>
Boxed Lunches AvailableBoxed Lunches Available19
Dinner Meetings for Pre-Conference Workshop Participants, Organizational Members, and Affinity GroupsDinner Meetings for Pre-Conference Workshop Participants, Organizational Members, and Affinity Groups44<h3>EXECUTIVES IN CHURCH-RELATED HIGHER EDUCATION</h3>Will meet Wednesday, March 23, 6:00–8:00 p.m., for dinner and discussion.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Mark N. Wilhelm</em></strong>, Executive Director, Network of Colleges and Universities, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA)</blockquote>
NetVUE Advisory Council MeetingNetVUE Advisory Council Meeting31
Lunch Meetings for Pre-Conference Workshop Participants, Organizational Members, and Affinity GroupsLunch Meetings for Pre-Conference Workshop Participants, Organizational Members, and Affinity Groups34<h3>ASSOCIATION OF CATHOLIC COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES</h3>Invites conference participants from member institutions to meet Thursday, March 24, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., for lunch and discussion. Those planning to attend should send an email to Rebecca Sawyer at <a href="mailto:rsawyer@accunet.org">rsawyer@accunet.org</a>.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Dennis H. Holtschneider</em></strong>, President and Chief Executive Officer, Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities<br></blockquote><br><h3>NETWORK OF ELCA COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES</h3>Invites conference participants from member institutions to meet Thursday, March 24, 11:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m., for lunch and discussion. Those planning to attend should send an email to Melinda Valverde at <a href="mailto:melinda.valverde@elca.org">melinda.valverde@elca.org</a>.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Mark N. Wilhelm</em></strong>, Executive Director, Network of Colleges and Universities, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA)<br></blockquote>
Dessert Bar and Social TimeDessert Bar and Social Time4
Post-Conference WorkshopsPost-Conference Workshops42WorkshopThese workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. Registration is open to anyone also registered for the NetVUE Conference. If you have already registered and would like to add a pre- or post-conference workshop to an existing registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.nche.edu">ttruscott@cic.nche.edu</a>.<br><br> These events begin on Saturday, March 26, at 1:00 p.m. and conclude at 4:00 p.m. that afternoon. The price for either workshop is $50. Some participants may wish to remain for dinner at their own expense. For those who need an additional night of accommodation, a limited number of rooms may be available at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel for Saturday night at the conference rate of $184; to reserve your room, please ask for the extra night when you make your hotel reservation for the conference, and pay for the extra night on site.<br><br> <h4>Measuring Impact: Demonstrating the Value of Vocation-Related Initiatives</h4>Educators recognize the centrality of data to academic decision-making, assessing program initiatives, showcasing successes, and addressing shortcomings. But not all educators have the background and resources to undertake this work, and not all assessment tools work for the entire range of vocation-related activities—from faculty workshops and in-classroom activities to co-curricular initiatives in student affairs, career services, or campus ministry.<br><br>This Saturday afternoon workshop will offer guiding principles and practical tips for those tasked with designing, directing, and assessing vocation-related programming. Participants will leave equipped with tools to demonstrate how well their programs achieve their stated goals. The workshop will focus on helping NetVUE leaders demonstrate the connections between vocation-related initiatives and their institution’s strategic priorities, including improved retention and graduation rates. Throughout the workshop, participants will work collaboratively, developing action plans that they can take back to campus, with the goal of quickly initiating or improving evaluation efforts in their vocation-related programming.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Tim Clydesdale</em></strong>, Vice Provost, Dean of Graduate Studies, and Professor of Sociology, The College of New Jersey<br><strong><em>Lisa Jasinski</em></strong>, Special Assistant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, Trinity University (TX)<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>Promoting Vocational Exploration among Minoritized Students</h4>Over the past two decades, programs to help students explore vocation and calling have had a significant impact on their collegiate experience, their career decisions, and the future direction of their lives. Unfortunately, however, the absorption of these programs among undergraduates has been dramatically uneven. In particular, at many institutions, students from minoritized groups participate in vocational exploration and discernment programming at a much lower rate than is the case for other identity groups.<br><br>In this Saturday afternoon workshop, participants will explore some of the reasons for this phenomenon: structural inequities that are built into many academic institutions, well-intentioned pedagogies that miss the mark, and messages that minoritized students have received throughout their lives—long before arriving at college. Most of the workshop will focus on practical steps to create vocation-related programs that are appropriate for the particular circumstances of minoritized students, making it possible for them to take full advantage of these opportunities. Workshop leaders will encourage participants to explore their own institutions’ practices—those that facilitate this work, as well as those that may be creating obstacles (no matter how unintentionally). Participants will also exchange best practices for developing programs that avoid creating a culture of mainstream and margins, but instead provide a “free and ordered space” in which all students can participate on an equal footing.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Chris Arguedas</em></strong>, Director, Intercultural Community Center, and Special Assistant to the President for Equity and Justice, Occidental College<br><strong><em>Kiki Kosnick</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Augustana College (IL)<br><strong><em>Richard Sévère</em></strong>, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of English, Valparaiso University</blockquote>
Welcoming Reception and DinnerWelcoming Reception and Dinner35
Plenary Address and Small Group Discussion: Nicholas AdamsPlenary Address and Small Group Discussion: Nicholas Adams6Nicholas AdamsPlenary Session<h3>INTERRELIGIOUS SCRIPTURAL REASONING AS A VOCATIONAL PRACTICE</h3><p>More than ever before, cultural and religious literacy are essential for all those seeking to live into their callings in life. These capacities are required for public work in the political sphere, medicine, law, education, and for the work of corporations and nongovernmental organizations. The vocational trajectories of everyone in higher education—students, staff, faculty members, and administrators— increasingly require us to attend to what shapes one another’s deepest commitments and practices. Although not all campuses have the resources to make intercultural and interreligious engagements a routine part of the collegiate experience, they can easily facilitate productive encounters with the key texts of a variety of religious traditions. The practice of <a href="http://www.scripturalreasoning.org/" target="_blank" aria-label="Opens in new window" rel="noopener noreferrer">Scriptural Reasoning</a> focuses on reading such texts together to stimulate conversation, empathy, and insight. This practice has developed over more than 20 years across several continents, with centers of practice and research in 12 countries, encompassing many languages and traditions. This plenary session will provide an introduction to Scriptural Reasoning and will guide participants through its actual practice in small groups, facilitated by NetVUE leaders with experience in this work. The session will conclude with guidance for implementing the practice of Scriptural Reasoning on campus and an assessment of its value for vocational reflection and discernment among undergraduate students. Participants will have the opportunity to learn more about bringing Scriptural Reasoning to their own institutional settings in a concurrent session following the plenary gathering.<br></p>
Networking and Refreshment BreakNetworking and Refreshment Break7
Concurrent WorkshopsConcurrent Workshops10Concurrent Session<h3>Blog, Webinar, Podcast: New Media Resources for Vocation</h3>New media resources have had an increasing impact on higher education over the past decade, and this trend has only intensified during the pandemics of the past year. Blogs, webinars, online workshops, and podcasts have become standard fare on every campus and within every academic organization. How can these resources be used to strengthen vocation-related initiatives? What are the advantages and drawbacks of various media for professional development and student programming? A panel of experienced users of new media in the academic context will lead participants in an exploration of methodologies, best practices, and lessons learned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Carr Harkrader</em></strong>, Director, Interfaith Leadership Institute, Interfaith Youth Core<br><strong><em>C. Hannah Schell</em></strong>, NetVUE Online Community Coordinator, Council of Independent Colleges<br><strong><em>Jason Stevens</em></strong>, Associate Professor of English, Cornerstone University<br><strong><em>Deanna A. Thompson</em></strong>, Martin E. Marty Regents Chair in Religion and the Academy, and Director, Lutheran Center for Faith, Values, and Community, St. Olaf College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Books on Vocation for the Undergraduate Setting</h3>As the literature on vocation and calling has expanded, educators at NetVUE member institutions have found themselves faced with a panoply of choices for student assignments. But how much of the current vocation literature is well suited for use with undergraduates? What features should one consider when assessing these resources and assigning them in the academic context? Are some readings and resources particularly useful in the classroom, while others are best employed in co-curricular settings (residence hall groups, athletic teams, student clubs, religious life programming)? In this session, four authors who have written books suitable for the undergraduate setting will offer recommendations of other books that can stimulate and supplement vocational conversations among students, both within and outside the classroom.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jacqueline A. Bussie</em></strong>, Executive Director, Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research<br><strong><em>Jason A. Mahn</em></strong>, Conrad Bergendoff Chair in the Humanities, and Director, Presidential Center for Faith and Learning, Augustana College (IL)<br><strong><em>Charles R. Pinches</em></strong>, Professor of Theology and Religious Studies, The University of Scranton<br><strong><em>Patrick B. Reyes</em></strong>, Senior Director of Learning Design, Forum for Theological Exploration<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Bringing Scriptural Reasoning to Campus</h3>As a sequel to Friday morning’s plenary session on Scriptural Reasoning (see page 7), this session will provide more detailed suggestions as to how this practice might be employed in the college or university setting. Attention will be paid to the specifics of implementing Scriptural Reasoning among different campus constituencies, including faculty members, staff, administrators, and students. Facilitators will also guide participants in the use of additional resources (many of which are available online) for choosing appropriate texts, training facilitators, encouraging participation, and assessing outcomes.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Nicholas Adams</em></strong>, Professor of Philosophical Theology, University of Birmingham<br><strong><em>Emily A. Filler</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Washington & Lee University<br><strong><em>Stephen E. Fowl</em></strong>, Professor of Theology and Dean of Loyola College of Arts and Sciences, Loyola University Maryland<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Called to Create Just Futures</h3>How can academic inquiry and community partnerships inform public policy on racial justice? How might undergraduate students be brought into this conversation and encouraged to explore their own callings to this work? What programs and activities can help students understand the issues and seek practical ways to respond? These questions will be addressed by leaders at CIC and NetVUE member institutions that are part of the Just Futures initiative of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Nine colleges and universities, including five CIC/NetVUE members, have designed projects that bring researchers and community activists together to examine the history of racial injustice in the institution’s community, assess its impact on contemporary inequities, and make recommendations for reparative policies to local and regional governments. Panelists will explain why they are participating in this initiative, describe the focus and progress of their projects, and consider how this work might relate to vocational exploration and discernment on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>William J. Craft</em></strong>, President, Concordia College (MN)<br><strong><em>Vivia L. Fowler</em></strong>, President, Wesleyan College (GA)<br><strong><em>Nakia Hamlett</em></strong>, William Meredith Assistant Professor of Psychology, Connecticut College<br><strong><em>Kimberly A. Rostan</em></strong>, Associate Professor of English, Co-coordinator of African/African-American Studies, and Director, Intercultural Studies Major, Wofford College<br><strong><em>Cynthia Neal Spence</em></strong>, Associate Professor of Sociology and Director, Social Justice Fellows Program and UNCF/Mellon Programs, Spelman College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>New Scholarship on Vocation and the Common Good</h3>The three volumes published thus far through the NetVUE Scholarly Resources Project have been widely used in NetVUE institutions to introduce faculty members, staff, and administrators to conversations on vocation and calling. These books have served as an introduction for newcomers, as a means of deeper engagement for faculty and staff reading groups, and as resources in the undergraduate classroom. NetVUE has now begun work on a fourth volume, which will focus on vocation and the common good. In this session, the new director of the Scholarly Resources Project will lead an interview-style discussion among five of the contributors to the forthcoming volume, focusing not only on their individual essays but also on the themes of the book as a whole. Participants will have an opportunity to offer suggestions as to the shape and content of the volume as it comes into final form.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jonathan Golden</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Comparative Religion, and Director, Center on Religion, Culture, and Conflict, Drew University<br><strong><em>Michelle Hayford</em></strong>, Associate Professor of Theatre and Director, Theatre, Dance, and Performance Technology Program, University of Dayton<br><strong><em>Robert Pampel</em></strong>, Director, University Honors Program, Saint Louis University<br><strong><em>Meghan M. Slining</em></strong>, Associate Professor of Health Sciences, Furman University<br><strong><em>Monica M. Smith</em></strong>, Vice President of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Augustana College (IL)<br><strong><em>Erin A. VanLaningham</em></strong>, Director, NetVUE Scholarly Resources Project, Council of Independent Colleges and Professor of English, Loras College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Self-Assessment Instruments for Vocational Reflection</h3>A number of instruments that are designed to help students explore their own gifts, talents, and strengths are available to faculty members and staff at NetVUE institutions. Many of these third-party resources have been used in offices of career services, first-year programs, and academic advising. How useful are these instruments as resources for genuine vocational reflection? When properly used, can they be an important first step for undergraduates who are beginning to consider their many callings in life? Or do they sometimes tend to become a substitute for more rigorous and hands-on vocational conversations? A panel of NetVUE leaders with experience of various instruments will offer advice on the best use of these resources for vocational exploration and discernment. Specific attention will be paid to StrengthsFinder, PathwayU, the Intercultural Development Inventory, and the Life Design/Career Construction instrument.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Bryan J. Dik</em></strong>, Professor of Psychology, Colorado State University–Fort Collins<br><strong><em>Ramon J. Emmart</em></strong>, Director of Career Services, Friends University David K. Miller, College Minister and Director of Justice Initiatives, Union College (KY)<br><strong><em>Tracy Wenger Sadd</em></strong>, Former Chaplain and Executive Director, Purposeful Life Work and Ethical Leadership, Elizabethtown College<br><strong><em>Kassia Waggoner</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of Composition, Friends University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Storytelling and Vocation: Institutional and Personal</h3>NetVUE leaders are often called upon to articulate the role of vocation and calling within their institutions—and in the lives of their colleagues and their students. Doing so requires not only the capacity to marshal the necessary information but also the ability to deliver the story in an engaging and encouraging way. Some people have a gift for telling a story well, but storytelling can also be taught; in fact, at least one NetVUE institution has developed a curriculum for teaching the art of storytelling. In this session, several talented storytellers (and teachers of storytelling) will relate their own experiences in this area and offer advice for telling the vocational story, both for individuals and for institutions. This session will be particularly useful for those who lead NetVUE grants or other vocational exploration programs and who have responsibilities for helping others understand the significance of this work.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Joshua Canada</em></strong>, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Azusa Pacific University<br><strong><em>Janice M. Del Negro</em></strong>, Professor of Information Studies, Dominican University (IL)<br><strong><em>Claire M. Noonan</em></strong>, Vice President for Mission and Planning, Dominican University (IL)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Vocation and the Religiously (In)Different Student</h3>An increasing percentage of undergraduate students at NetVUE institutions have grown up in faith communities other than the ones that have traditionally marked the college or university that they attend. Other students—perhaps a yet larger number—find themselves at the margins of (or completely outside of) traditional religious communities. Although the language of vocation and calling is certainly employed in secular as well as religious contexts, some students may assume that vocational reflection is primarily a religious (and often a specifically Christian) undertaking. How might educators help these religiously different (or indifferent) students recognize the importance of vocational reflection? Three NetVUE leaders who have worked with students who embrace a variety of lifestances will offer advice and resources for bringing these students into the conversation about vocation and calling.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Florence D. Amamoto</em></strong>, Professor Emerita of English, Japanese Studies, and Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, Gustavus Adolphus College<br><strong><em>Younus Y. Mirza</em></strong>, Director of Global Virtual Learning and Religion Scholar in Residence, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Matthew R. Sayers</em></strong>, Professor of Religion and Director of Religion and Philosophy, Lebanon Valley College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Vocation beyond the Undergraduate Setting</h3>The focus of NetVUE has traditionally been on undergraduate students. Nevertheless, even those member institutions with an exclusively baccalaureate academic program have important constituencies that fall outside the traditional “undergraduate” realm. These include the institution’s graduates, members of the local community, faculty and staff retirees, and prospective students (and their parents). How might NetVUE member institutions extend the conversation about vocation and calling to these constituencies? How might this work also serve as an additional resource for undergraduates who are discerning their own callings? Three academic administrators will describe initiatives and perspectives that can help broaden the scope of vocation and calling beyond the undergraduate setting to those in all stages and walks of life. The panelists will also discuss the impact that this work can have on current students.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Paul C. Pribbenow</em></strong>, President, Augsburg University<br><strong><em>Shirley H. Showalter</em></strong>, Former President, Goshen College<br><strong><em>Rueben C. Warren</em></strong>, Director, National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care, Tuskegee University</blockquote>

 

 

DispForm.aspx43DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=432022-03-23T04:00:00Z16001300
DispForm.aspx44DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=442022-03-23T04:00:00Z20001800
DispForm.aspx32DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=322022-03-24T04:00:00Z09000730
DispForm.aspx33DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=332022-03-24T04:00:00Z12000900
DispForm.aspx34DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=342022-03-24T04:00:00Z13301130
DispForm.aspx21DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=212022-03-24T04:00:00Z15001400
DispForm.aspx2DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=22022-03-24T04:00:00Z17151530
DispForm.aspx3DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=32022-03-24T04:00:00Z18301730
DispForm.aspx35DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=352022-03-24T04:00:00Z20301830
DispForm.aspx4DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=42022-03-24T04:00:00Z20302030
DispForm.aspx5DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=52022-03-25T04:00:00Z08300700
DispForm.aspx25DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=252022-03-25T04:00:00Z08300745
DispForm.aspx6DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=62022-03-25T04:00:00Z10150845
DispForm.aspx7DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=72022-03-25T04:00:00Z10451015
DispForm.aspx36DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=362022-03-25T04:00:00Z11451045
DispForm.aspx9DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=92022-03-25T04:00:00Z13001200
DispForm.aspx10DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=102022-03-25T04:00:00Z14451315
DispForm.aspx26DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=262022-03-25T04:00:00Z15151445
DispForm.aspx27DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=272022-03-25T04:00:00Z16151515
DispForm.aspx11DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=112022-03-25T04:00:00Z17001630
DispForm.aspx12DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=122022-03-25T04:00:00Z18151700
DispForm.aspx13DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=132022-03-25T04:00:00Z18301830
DispForm.aspx14DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=142022-03-26T04:00:00Z08450700
DispForm.aspx38DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=382022-03-26T04:00:00Z10000900
DispForm.aspx17DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=172022-03-26T04:00:00Z10301000
DispForm.aspx18DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=182022-03-26T04:00:00Z12001030
DispForm.aspx19DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=192022-03-26T04:00:00Z12001200
DispForm.aspx31DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=312022-03-26T04:00:00Z16001230
DispForm.aspx42DispForm.aspxhttps://www.cic.edu/p/2022-NetVUE-Conference/Lists/SessionTimes/DispForm.aspx?ID=422022-03-26T04:00:00Z16001300

Pre- and Post-Conference Workshops

Surveys of participants in past NetVUE Conferences have indicated a desire for a slightly longer conference and more opportunities to gather in smaller groups. In response to this expression of interest, NetVUE will offer, for the first time, pre- and post-conference workshops for those who are able to arrive a day early or stay through Saturday afternoon. Four options are being offered as a pilot program this year: two that will begin on the day preceding the conference (continuing through lunch on the following day), and two that will take place on Saturday afternoon, after the conference concludes.

These workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. Registration is open to anyone also registered for the NetVUE Conference. An additional registration fee covers materials and refreshments (and, in the case of the pre-conference workshops, meals and overnight lodging at the conference hotel). If you have already registered and would like to add a pre- or post-conference workshop to an existing registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at ttruscott@cic.edu.

Pre-Conference Workshops will begin on Wednesday, March 23, at 1:00 p.m. and conclude with lunch on Thursday, March 24. The price for either workshop is $400 and includes Wednesday dinner, Thursday breakfast and lunch, and overnight accommodations at the conference hotel. Two options are available in this Wednesday/Thursday timeslot: Bringing Vocation into the Classroom, a seminar designed for faculty members (and limited to 16 participants), and Vocation and Career: Helping Students Ask the Right Questions, intended for those who work in career services, student advisors and supervisors, faculty members, and others who engage students as they chart their future directions in life. Complete descriptions of these sessions are available in the Preliminary Schedule above, by navigating to Wednesday or Thursday and clicking on the “Pre-Conference Workshops” link.

Post-Conference Workshops begin on Saturday, March 26, at 1:00 p.m. and conclude at 4:00 p.m. that afternoon. The price for either workshop is $50. Some participants may wish to remain for dinner at their own expense. For those who need an additional night of accommodation, a limited number of rooms may be available at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel for Saturday night at the conference rate of $184; to reserve your room, please ask for the extra night when you make your hotel reservation for the conference, and pay for the extra night on site. Two options are available in this Saturday afternoon timeslot: Measuring Impact: Demonstrating the Value of Vocation-Related Initiatives, which will offer guiding principles and practical tips for demonstrating the success of vocation-related initiatives, and Promoting Vocational Exploration among Minoritized Students, offering practical steps to create vocation-related programs will make it possible for these students to take full advantage of these opportunities. Complete descriptions of these sessions are available in the Preliminary Schedule above, by navigating to Saturday and clicking on the “Post-Conference Workshops” link.

Call for Proposals

​Participating institutions are invited to develop a concurrent session presentation about any aspect of vocational exploration and discernment. Ideas and programs that emerge from campus experiences linked to NetVUE programs, grants, campus visits, faculty seminars, or other initiatives are especially encouraged, as are presentations that intersect with this year’s conference theme, “Called into Community: Vocation, Engagement, and Difference.” Presentations may focus on any facet of vocation, whether from the perspective of a curricular program in an academic discipline (theology, ethics, literature, psychology, or any other field, or across disciplines) or in relation to campus activities in advising and mentoring, career development, campus ministry, community engagement, or any other campus venue where vocational exploration takes place. Proposals may share effective practices, emerging opportunities, or assessment of what has worked well—and what could be improved—for campus vocational exploration programs.
 
Please Note: In a change from previous NetVUE Conferences, this year’s proposal selection process will be a competitive one. Fewer than 30 one-hour slots are available for campus presentations from NetVUE’s 270 member institutions. (For a point of comparison, the 2019 NetVUE Conference drew over 70 proposals, resulting in the need to combine campus sessions and to create a densely-packed schedule.) Campus teams whose proposals cannot be accommodated may be invited to convert their plans into a breakfast roundtable discussion or a poster that can be displayed in the common areas at the conference.

Proposals will be evaluated and selected according to the following criteria:

  • Relevance and interest level for other NetVUE member institutions;
  • Evidence of forethought and consideration in the creation of the proposal;
  • Likely appeal of presentation methods (including audio-visual elements, if planned);
  • Contribution of the topic and presenters to the diversity of the NetVUE Conference; and
  • Adherence to the proposal guidelines for a complete application (below).

Proposals that combine presenters from two or more NetVUE institutions are especially
encouraged. (In such cases, please submit only one combined proposal and identify one institution as taking the lead for purposes of communication and logistics.)

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMITTING A CONCURRENT SESSION PROPOSAL

Presentation proposals should include a plan for a one-hour session, including 15–20 minutes of presentation (somewhat more if small-group discussion is integrated into the presentation), complemented by a time for questions and discussion with session participants. To propose a concurrent session presentation, please submit a single document, not to exceed three pages in 12-point font, covering all seven of the points in the list below. (Please copy the boldface section labels into your document so that the completeness of your proposal can be easily recognized.)

  1. Title that describes the presentation topic or theme;
  2. Names and position titles of those who are expected to make the presentation;
  3. Biographies of each presenter, in the required size and style (PDFavailable here);
  4. Public description (four to five sentences) of the proposed content, suitable for publication in the conference program;
  5. Session details (two to three paragraphs) describing the session’s content, method of presentation, and any audio-visual plans (a preliminary version of any expected slide presentation is encouraged and may be attached as a separate file);
  6. Discussion questions designed to encourage conversation among session participants; and
  7. Diversity considerations, specifically, a statement of how the proposed session will contribute to the diversity of issues, participants, and perspectives at the NetVUE Conference.
Concurrent session proposals should be submitted by email as a single attachment (optionally, a tentative slide presentation may be included as a second attachment) and sent to Lynne Spoelhof, NetVUE program manager, at lspoelhof@cic.edu.

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSAL SUBMISSION: NOVEMBER 12, 2021

An Ongoing Conversation

As a learning community, NetVUE supports member campuses as they help students discover, explore, and wrestle with their callings. Learning communities flourish when members share common readings, join in mutual conversations, and compare their perspectives. At the 2022 NetVUE Conference, the initiatives described below are designed to stimulate and strengthen the NetVUE community of reflection and discernment.


PRE-CONFERENCE READINGS

Prior to the conference, participants will be invited to read a small selection of materials to help focus discussions throughout the event. Access to these readings will be provided several months in advance of the conference.


SMALL DISCUSSION GROUPS

On Thursday afternoon and during Friday’s lunch, participants will meet in pre-designated small groups, designed to create new relationships among those who share various commonalities but who might not yet have met. Friday and Saturday breakfast sessions also will provide opportunities for discussions about specific topics related to vocation and calling. The primary purpose of these conversations is to compare and contrast approaches to vocational reflection and discernment and to consider how vocation-related initiatives can be sustained over time.

 

NETWORKING AND COHORTS

One of the most important goals of the NetVUE Conference is to stimulate and strengthen the development of networks across member institutions. Many sessions are designed to introduce participants to individuals on other campuses that share certain commonalities with one another, whether institutional (size, type, setting, religious affiliation) or individual (position, campus role, portfolio, on-campus networks). Participants are encouraged to make use of these opportunities—both within and outside of formal sessions—for networking and for the creation and development of cross-campus cohorts for mutual support.


FORUMS FOR PRESIDENTS AND CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICERS

Presidents and chief academic officers are invited to take part in candid conversations regarding changing institutional contexts and approaches to broaden and sustain vocational exploration initiatives while attending to institutional mission and resources. Presidents will gather on Friday morning and chief academic officers on Saturday morning for these discussions. In each case, two NetVUE member leaders in these roles will facilitate the discussion.

Hotel and Travel

 Location

Sheraton Dallas Hotel

400 North Olive Street
Dallas, TX 75201
(214) 922-8000

 Hotel Information

front view of hotelPlease note: Participants must make their own hotel reservations after registering for the conference. The hotel room rate for conference dates is included with conference registration.

Room Rate:
$184 single/double per night

Hotel Reservation Deadline:
February 15, 2022

The Sheraton Dallas Hotel is located in the heart of the arts and financial district of downtown Dallas and has been recently renovated. The hotel features several dining options (including a Grab ‘n Go market), an outdoor pool, and a fitness center, in addition to 1,840 renovated guest rooms. DART light rail offers easy access from the hotel to Dallas’s vibrant entertainment districts, including the Arts District, Uptown, and Deep Ellum. The hotel also is within walking distance of the Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas World Aquarium, and the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial.


Hotel Reservation Procedure

Please note: Participants must make their own hotel reservations after registering for the NetVUE Conference. The hotel room rate for conference dates (Thursday and Friday nights) is included with conference registration.

Participants must first register for the NetVUE Conference in order to make a hotel reservation. After registration, participants will receive a confirmation email that includes detailed instructions and a code to make a reservation at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel. CIC will cover the expense of the first three team members’ hotel rooms for the nights of March 24 and 25. The registration fee for fourth and fifth team members already includes payment of the discounted hotel room rate of $184 single/double per night for these two nights. (For those who have registered and paid for a pre-conference workshop, the night of Wednesday, March 23 is also included.)

The hotel reservation deadline is Tuesday, February 15, 2022. Hotel rooms may sell out before the deadline, so participants are encouraged to register for the conference and reserve their hotel rooms as soon as possible. Please note that hotel reservations made after the deadline can only be accommodated on a space-available basis and may be at a rate higher than the CIC rate.

Participants who wish to extend their stay beyond the conference dates may do so at their own expense. A limited number of rooms are available at the conference rate for an extended stay. Please call the Sheraton Dallas Hotel at (214) 922-8000 to make arrangements.

 Travel

Travel Costs

Please note that travel expenses of all team members are the responsibility of individuals or their institutions. A limited number of travel grants are available to NetVUE member colleges and universities with limited resources or with unusually high travel expenses. To inquire about a travel grant, please contact David S. Cunningham, director of NetVUE, at dcunningham@cic.edu or (616) 395-6750.


Transportation

The Sheraton Dallas Hotel is located approximately eight miles from Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL) and approximately 19 miles (25 minutes) from Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW). Transportation to the hotel is available from several providers that are located just outside the baggage claim area of each airport.

Transportation Options from Dallas Love Field Airport

Transportation Options from Dallas Fort Worth International Airport

Estimated rideshare and taxi fares are $25 to $30 one-way from Dallas Love Field and $35 to $55 one-way from Dallas Fort Worth International Airport.
 

Hotel Parking

(Rates as of July 21)
Self-parking at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel is discounted at approximately $19 per day and overnight valet parking is about $35 per day. Taxes are included with these rates.