Workshop Leaders

At each workshop, presenters will include experienced department or division chairs, chief academic officers who are knowledgeable about the work of chairs, an attorney who has experience with the legal issues that department and division chairs at independent colleges and universities face, and a CIC staff member. The following individuals will lead sessions and make presentations at the workshops.
 
Greenville, SC (April 9–11)
 
William C. Deeds is vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college at Morningside College and has served in this role since 2000. Previously, he served Moravian College as dean for academic affairs and professor and chair of the department of psychology. Deeds has presented at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers. His interests include liberal education, assessment of student learning, faculty hiring and development, and using data effectively for planning and decision making.

Beth Tyner Jones is a partner with Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice LLP in the firm’s Raleigh, North Carolina, office. She practices primarily in the areas of employment and education law and uses her experience as a human resources professional and in-house legal counsel to assist both public and private institutions of higher education. Jones has experience in representing these colleges and universities in a broad range of issues such as tenure denial, faculty discipline and dismissal matters, discrimination and harassment, program closures, wrongful termination, student discipline, FERPA compliance, accommodation requests, investigations, and governance matters. She is a frequent presenter at regional and national meetings on legal issues in higher education.
 

Rita E. Knuesel is provost of the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University. She also has served the joint institutions as chair of the music program and the College of Saint Benedict as dean of the college. Knuesel is a frequent presenter on topics such as collaborative approaches to improving teaching and learning, faculty governance, and administrative reporting structures. She has served as a mentor in the CIC Workshop for New Chief Academic Officers and has presented at the CIC Institute for Chief Academic Officers. Knuesel was the recipient of the 2013 CIC Chief Academic Officer Award.
 

Catharine O’Connell is vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college at Mary Baldwin College. Previously, she served as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Defiance College, dean for academic affairs at Cabrini College, and chair of the English department at St. John Fisher College. Her scholarly work focuses on 19th century American literature and issues in contemporary higher education. O’Connell has been a frequent presenter at regional and national meetings on topics including global learning and citizenship, community-based research, outcomes assessment, and faculty-student learning communities.
 

Richard Ostrander has served as provost of Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, since 2009. Previously, he served as a division chair in social sciences and dean of undergraduate studies at John Brown University. A historian of American religion and an academic administrator, Ostrander maintains an active scholarly interest in higher education. His publications include many books, book chapters, and journal articles. Ostrander’s book, Why College Matters to God: Academic Faithfulness and Christian Higher Education (2009), is used by several colleges and universities for their first-year seminars. The sequel, Reconsidering College: Christian Higher Education for Working Adults, was published in January 2014. A former Fulbright Scholar to Germany, Ostrander has led many student and alumni trips to Europe and traveled to over 20 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America. He has contributed articles on global education to the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and Books and Culture. His most recent article, “Globalizing Christian Higher Education: Reflections from Delhi and Kampala,” is forthcoming in Christian Higher Education Journal.


Elizabeth L. Paul, provost and vice president for academic affairs and professor of psychology at Stetson University, previously served as vice provost and professor of psychology at the College of New Jersey, a public residential college. While at the College of New Jersey, Paul also served as interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, chair of the department of psychology, and interim vice president for student life. Her academic experience also includes service as a faculty member at Wellesley College and as a research associate at Harvard University. Paul served as president of the Council on Undergraduate Research in 2010–2011 and has made presentations at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers.


Ken Peterson joined the Furman University economics faculty in 1990. His teaching interests include microeconomic theory, urban economics, population economics, environmental economics, and research methods in economics. Peterson was the recipient of the Alester G. Furman, Jr. and Janie Earle Furman Award for Meritorious Teaching. His recent research interests have been in the areas of hedonic house pricing, parking policies and environmental impacts, and social capital. Peterson also has supervised numerous undergraduate research projects through the economics department’s summer research program. He is in his ninth year as department chair.


Cleveland, OH (May 12–14)

Michael Glassman is a partner in Dinsmore & Shohl’s labor and employment department and chairs the employment law practice group. He has practiced management-side labor and employment law for over 30 years. Glassman represents employers regionally and nationally in employment disputes and matters of all types in federal and state courts, administrative agencies, and in arbitral forums. He advises on matters involving traditional labor and union issues, collective bargaining, discrimination, sexual harassment, wrongful discharge, OSHA, wage-hour, leave, and other issues that involve the employer/employee relationship. Glassman is a frequent speaker and trainer on labor and employment law topics and previously taught labor and employment law as an adjunct professor at Xavier University. He has been recognized by his peers as an Ohio Super Lawyer, is listed in Best Lawyers in America, and is recognized as a Leading Business Lawyer by Chambers USA Guide to America’s Leading Business Attorneys. He serves as the Ohio representative to the Employment Law Alliance (ELA), a comprehensive global network of employment and labor attorneys.


Susan Schneider Hasseler has held the position of senior vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college at Augustana College (SD) since 2012. She previously served as dean of the school of business, education, and social sciences and dean of community engagement at Messiah College, as a faculty member and associate dean for teacher education at Calvin College, and as a faculty member at Michigan State University. Hasseler’s scholarly interests include inclusive excellence, international education, and leadership. She has made presentations around the world and published numerous articles on education-related issues.


Charles McCormick is provost and vice president for academic affairs at Schreiner University. He previously served in faculty and administrative positions at Cabrini College. His scholarly work focuses on folklore studies, and he has made presentations to higher education associations on the assessment of student learning, undergraduate research, and civic engagement. McCormick is a member of the honors advisory committee of the Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars and served as an organizer of the state capital programs for undergraduate research in both Pennsylvania and Texas.


Walda Powell is the Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough Professor of Chemistry and department head of chemistry, physics, and geoscience at Meredith College in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she has served since 1995. She is a chemist with interests in experimental design and the preparation of novel bioactive compounds (compounds that have an effect on a living organism, cell, or tissue), with multiple scholarly publications. Powell also has worked to advance science education for pre-college students. She serves on the board of the North Carolina Science and Engineering Fair and has taught in the North Carolina Governor’s School East. In 2004 and 2014 she received the Pauline Davis Perry Award for Excellence in Teaching at Meredith.
 

R. Richard Ray, Jr. is provost and professor of kinesiology at Hope College. Prior to serving in his current position he served as the college’s dean for social sciences and chair of the kinesiology department. As chair he oversaw a department that was home to majors in athletic training, exercise science, and physical education. Ray directed the major in athletic training and coordinated the distinguished lecture series in sports medicine. He holds certification as an athletic trainer, was elected to the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Hall of Fame in 2006, and received the career achievement award from the University of Michigan School of Kinesiology in 2009. He was a contributor to Core Concepts in Athletic Training (2012), Praeger Handbook of Sports Medicine and Athlete Health (2010), and several articles on athletic training in professional journals, and he is the author of three books on athletic training practice and leadership.


Marc M. Roy is provost and professor of biology at Goucher College. Earlier, he served as academic vice president at Coe College and associate academic dean at Beloit College. Roy has served as a National Science Foundation grant review panelist and has received grants from the W.M. Keck and Sanger Foundations, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the Carver Charitable Trust. He is the chair of the American Conference of Academic Deans. Roy is a frequent presenter at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs.
 

Jeanine Stewart is provost and dean of faculty at McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. Her academic leadership experience spans more than a decade at three different liberal arts institutions. Stewart has led strategic planning initiatives, overseen program prioritization and cost reduction modeling, and developed successful student recruitment, retention, and competitive program enhancement within a Division III Athletics program. Originally trained as a neuroscientist, her current scholarly work applies positive psychological concepts to employee evaluation models in the field of managerial accounting. Stewart is a frequent presenter at conferences on topics related to higher education management and workplace dynamics. She currently serves on the board of Target Community and Educational Services in Westminster, Maryland.


Providence, RI (MAY 19–21)
 
Jeffrey H. Barker is vice president for academic affairs and dean of the school of humanities and sciences at Converse College, where he has served since 2002. A philosopher by training, his scholarly work focuses on bioethics and includes books, book chapters, and essays in philosophy journals and law reviews. Barker serves as vice chair of the institutional review board for the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, as a member of the institutional biosafety committee of the Biomedical Research Alliance of New York, and as a consultant member of the bioethics committee of the South Carolina Medical Association. He also is past coordinator of the CIC Workshop for New Chief Academic Officers.


Johnnella E. Butler is professor of comparative women’s studies at Spelman College, where she also served as provost and vice president for academic affairs from 2005–2014. Prior to joining Spelman in 2005, she served as professor and chair of American ethnic studies and associate dean and associate vice provost, the graduate school at the University of Washington, Seattle. Earlier in her career, she was a tenured faculty member and department chair at Smith College. Butler’s scholarly work focuses on topics ranging from pedagogy, ethnic studies, and African-American literary theory to institutional change and relationships among democracy, diversity, and civic engagement in liberal education. She has lectured and conducted workshops at colleges and universities throughout the United States and in Europe and is at work on a fourth book to be titled Diversity, the First Liberal Art.


Kenneth P. Carson, provost of Geneva College, has held faculty and administrative positions at Geneva since 1999. He previously served as a faculty member at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, in the School of Business at Arizona State University, and at California Polytechnic State University at Pomona. Carson earned a PhD in organizational psychology from the University of Akron in 1985. He has published and presented on many topics in human resource management, organizational psychology, and statistics. He is a frequent presenter at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers.

 

R. Joseph Dieker is vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college at Cornell College in Iowa. Prior to coming to Cornell he served in a similar position at Culver-Stockton College. At Culver-Stockton he was professor of music and chair of the fine arts division. Dieker has made presentations at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers. He is a conductor and clarinetist, and he continues to find performance opportunities within his busy schedule.
 

Stacey A. Peterson is department chair and associate professor of communication arts at Notre Dame of Maryland University in Baltimore. Her specialties include public speaking, public relations, interpersonal communication, and the exploration of issues surrounding gender and cultural identity. In addition to her teaching, Peterson also has conducted financial literacy workshops and worked as a meeting facilitator and public speaking coach. She oversaw media relations for nonprofit organizations and local musical groups prior to relocating to Maryland from her home state of New Jersey. She has published numerous articles in her field and is currently working on a book chapter addressing college students and challenges with academic advising.
 

Kathleen A. Rinehart serves as general counsel for Saint Xavier University (IL). Prior to her position at Saint Xavier, she led the education law practices at two large law firms in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Rinehart developed a general counsel model for use on campuses that did not have an established, in-house general counsel office. She has served as counsel to boards, presidents, and other administrative leaders regarding matters of governance; strategic planning; legal compliance; drafting and implementation of institutional documents, policies, and procedures; management of student issues and education records; campus safety; prevention of legal exposure; and litigation management. Rinehart presents lectures and workshops for regional and national professional associations on supervisory best practices, the application of dispute resolution in higher education, and other substantive issues of concern to colleges and universities.
 

Steven Siconolfi has served as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Rockford University since 2012. Previously, he served in various academic administrative roles at several small private colleges and universities and a public research institution. A full professor, his major field is exercise science, but he also has taught courses in physics, occupational therapy, physical therapy, statistics, and leadership. Siconolfi has been a member of budget committees for over 12 years. He helped develop financial plans for new undergraduate and graduate-level programs and developed a model that computes profit margin at the department level. In addition to his service in academia, Siconolfi has worked as a researcher with NASA and NIH and holds two patents.


San Diego, CA (JUNE 2–4)
 
Natasha Baker is a partner with Hirschfeld Kraemer LLP in the firm’s San Francisco office. Baker represents private and public institutions of higher education in a broad range of legal matters, including Title IX, student discipline, FERPA compliance, disability accommodation for students and employees, faculty discipline, and employment matters such as tenure denial and dismissal, harassment, discrimination, and wrongful termination. She has made presentations at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs, Institute for Chief Academic Officers, and Presidents Institute.
 

Mark J. Braun is provost of Gustavus Adolphus College, where he also served as associate dean and department chair in communication studies. From 2007 to 2011, Braun was senior vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college at Augustana College (SD). He has made presentations at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers, has served on the national board for the Broadcast Education Association, is currently on the board of directors for the American Conference of Academic Deans, and is the recipient of the 2014 CIC Chief Academic Officer Award.
 

Mary Ann Gawelek is provost and dean of the faculty at Seton Hill University, where she is professor of psychology and teaches a senior integrative seminar. Before coming to Seton Hill, Gawelek served as dean of Lesley University’s counseling psychology and expressive therapies division and interim dean of the graduate school. Her interests include exploration of the effects of gender on teaching and learning, educational equity issues that face undergraduate women, and multiculturalism. Gawelek has served as coordinator for the CIC Workshop for New Chief Academic Officers and in 2011 received CIC’s Chief Academic Officer Award. She is a frequent presenter at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers.


Ann M. Kakaliouras is associate professor of anthropology and chair of the department of sociology, anthropology, and social work at Whittier College, where she teaches courses in biological anthropology, archaeology, Native American studies, gender studies, and theory in anthropology. Her current research investigates the material, policy, and scientific reverberations of cultural encounters between physical anthropologists and Native American people during the 20th century. Along with her chair duties she is currently the faculty representative to Whittier’s Title IX committee and is participating faculty in the environmental science/studies and gender studies programs. Prior to coming to Whittier in 2006, Kakaliouras served as assistant professor of anthropology at Appalachian State University in North Carolina for three years.


John Kolander, provost of Wisconsin Lutheran College, has served as the college’s chief academic officer since 2004. Prior to his current position, he was a teacher and administrator for Lutheran elementary and high schools in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Kolander’s research interests include campus and organizational culture, curriculum development, and leadership development. Kolander is a frequent presenter at the CIC Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers.
 

Leanne M. Neilson is provost and vice president for academic affairs and professor of psychology at California Lutheran University. Neilson is a clinical psychologist and is active in work related to accreditation and assessment. She has presented on topics pertinent to higher education administration at the CIC Institute for Chief Academic Officers and the Workshops for Department and Division Chairs.
 

Michael G. Tannenbaum is provost and vice president for academic affairs at Hartwick College. Before coming to Hartwick, he spent 11 years as dean of the school of science and professor of biology at Marist College, where he served as an advocate for undergraduate research and founded the college’s annual celebration of undergraduate research and creative activity. Tannenbaum also held faculty positions at Marshall University and Truman State University (where he served as department chair and as co-principal investigator on three NSF-Research Experiences for Undergraduates site awards), and research positions at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and at Colorado State University. Tannenbaum was president of the Council on Undergraduate Research in 2005–2006.