Concurrent Sessions


Sunday, November 4
10:30–11:45 a.m.

Academic Program Review: What Happens to the Results?
Review of academic programs at regular intervals is accepted as good practice, and on most campuses it follows a five-to seven-year cycle. What does the review process look like, and what happens to the recommendations made during the reviews? Who is responsible for acting on the recommendations? Participants will learn about successful academic program review processes and have an opportunity to exchange ideas.
  • Richard M. Ashbrook, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs, Capital University
  • Debbie Mauldin Cottrell, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Texas Lutheran University
  • R. Richard Ray, Jr., Provost, Hope College
  • Chair: Michael Imhoff, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Austin College
Access and Success for First-Generation Students
Institutions that received CIC/Walmart College Success A wards in 2008 and 2010 used the funds to strengthen programs that had already demonstrated success in enrolling and graduating first-generation students. Many of these campuses developed or improved support systems for students and utilized faculty members and staff to help students and their families. A panel of senior administrators will share their experiences, discuss plans to continue the programs, and describe effective practices in creating programs for first-generation students.
  • David Brailow, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Franklin College (IN)
  • Ellis F. Hall, III, Dean of Students, Franklin College (IN)
  • Donna Jurick, SND, Executive Vice President, St. Edward’s University
  • Chair: Philip Acree Cavalier, Provost and Dean of the College, Eureka College
Developing New Degree Programs
Introducing a new degree program requires careful planning, including data collection and analysis; making the case for faculty positions, facilities, and library resources; and winning over the skeptics. Participants will discuss the recent experiences at several institutions.
  • Robin Abramson, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Champlain College
  • Elizabeth V. Fuller, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Becker College
  • Frank E. Pettigrew, Provost, Ashland University
  • Dale H. Simmons, Interim Dean, College of Professional Studies, Aurora University
  • Chair: Christine Pharr, Vice President for Academic Affairs, College of Saint Mary
How to Determine if Retirement Incentives Are Working
Many faculty members are delaying retirement because the weak economy has led to diminished retirement portfolios and uncertainty about paying for health insurance. Institutions are offering faculty members one or more institution-wide financial incentive retirement programs that usually originate in administrative decisions after a careful study of the impact on the institution’s budget. When a financial incentive is offered, it is typically limited to participation by tenured faculty members once they meet a plan’s requirements for age or years of service. How can CAOs promote early retirement plans to eligible faculty members? How receptive are faculty members to these plans? How well are they working? A panel of CAOs will discuss faculty members’ reactions to early retirement incentive plans and suggest effective approaches.
  • Frank Buscher, Academic Vice President, Christian Brothers University
  • Timothy E. Fulop, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Aloysius College
  • A. Wayne Lowen, Executive Vice President and Provost, Kansas Wesleyan University
  • Carolyn R. Newton, Provost, The College of Wooster
  • Chair: Leslie T. Lambert, Provost and Executive Vice President, Ferrum College
Restructuring Academic Affairs
The complexities of curricular offerings, the addition of graduate degree programs, structural changes as colleges become universities, and the financial realities of tight budgets have motivated many colleges to reorganize academic affairs divisions. Changes have included combining smaller departments into divisions, creating schools and colleges within the academic affairs unit, and reassigning administrative duties that once resided in the provost’s office to associate provosts, assistant vice presidents, and newly minted deans. What are the opportunities and challenges that result from reorganization? What are the roles of faculty members and academic affairs administrators in the decision-making process? What opportunities arise for developing new leadership? CAOs at institutions that have experience with such reorganization as well as those that are completing the transformation will offer their views. Participants will learn about shared governance considerations and have an opportunity to share their experiences.
  • John Kolander, Provost, Wisconsin Lutheran College
  • Victoria A. McGillin, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Otterbein University
  • Chair: Karen Gainey, Executive Vice President and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Limestone College


1:30–2:45 p.m.
 
Faculty Compensation
In this session, a panel of CAOs will explore the ways in which institutions devise faculty compensation plans. Some institutions use benchmarking approaches; some include across-the-board increases and merit pay; and others let market forces play a significant role in the process. Participants will learn about various approaches to compensation for faculty members and exchange ideas about salary plans and effective ways to weather the campus politics usually associated with various approaches.
  • Kenneth P. Carson, Provost, Geneva College
  • Elizabeth H. Tobin, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Illinois College
  • Katherine Whatley, Provost, Berry College
  • Chair: William C. Deeds, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Morningside College
Making Effective Use of Department and Division Chairs as Critical Links in Academic Administration
In the most recent survey, CIC department and division chairs reported that their responsibilities have increased in scope and complexity over the past five years. In addition to traditional duties, they have been asked to take a more active role in institution-wide decision making, such as hiring and evaluating part-time instructors; participating in reappointment, tenure, and promotion processes; and settling disputes among colleagues. To help deans or provosts who do not conduct formal annual reviews of department chairs, a panel of CAOs who have made recent presentations at CIC’s Workshops for Department and Division Chairs will lead a discussion of the department and division chair’s evolving leadership role and explore the types of evaluations that are appropriate and useful.
  • Christine DeVinne, OSU, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Notre Dame of Maryland University
  • David R. Evans, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Buena Vista University
  • Stuart J. Sigman, Provost and Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, American Jewish University
  • Chair: R. Joseph Dieker, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Cornell College (IA)
New Approaches and Procedures in Teacher Education Programs
CIC institutions are well known for high-quality programs that prepare competent, well-grounded K-12 teachers for the nation’s public and private schools. In recent years, concern about the quality of K-12 teaching has resulted in increased state regulation and more costly mandated assessments. Both the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) have worked with CIC institutions as they engaged in self-scrutiny and attempts to address outsiders’ concerns. Participants will learn about the recent NCATE and TE AC merger that has produced the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), the accreditation experiences of two TEAC campuses, and new federal policy issues.
  • Mark LaCelle-Peterson, President, Teacher Education Accreditation Council
  • James E. Seidelman, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Westminster College (UT)
  • Robert A. Shaw, Dean, School of Education, Westminster College (UT)
  • Marion Terenzio, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Bloomfield College
  • Chair: Sherry McCarthy, Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs, William Woods University
Presidential Leadership—Opportunities and Challenges
This session provides guidance for CAOs who may be considering a college presidency. What personal and professional issues should CAOs consider? What are the pros and cons of making this move? What qualities and experiences are boards of trustees and search consultants looking for in presidential candidates? What errors do candidates often make in the search process? Representatives of two executive search firms will explore these questions and others raised by participants. Spouses are welcome.
  • Richard P. Allen, President, RPA Inc.
  • Jessica Kozloff, President, Academic Search, Inc.
  • Chair: Daniel Taddie, Provost, University of the Ozarks
Preventive Law I: Managing the Hiring Process
Current social and economic challenges require chief academic officers to think more carefully about the legal risks campuses face when conducting searches for new faculty members. An attorney with experience in relevant cases will discuss best hiring practices, including drafting the position description, appointing the search committee, managing candidate files, checking references, completing background checks, and interviewing candidates.
  • Natasha Baker, Attorney, Hirschfeld Kramer, LLP
  • Chair: Iris J. Turkenkopf, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Saint Mary College (NY)
Steps in the Strategic Planning Process
Before a strategic plan can take shape, leaders should engage in a broad conversation about the initiatives to include. How does a campus decide which programs become strategic initiatives? What process is used to develop this list? How does the list of strategic initiatives find its way into a strategic plan? When do budgetary considerations enter the process? A panel of CAOs who have engaged in the strategic planning process will share their experiences and engage participants in a discussion of best practices.
  • Marlene Moore, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, Willamette University
  • Carolyn J. Stefanco, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Agnes Scott College
  • Mary E. Morton Strey, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Central College
  • Chair: Stephany Schlachter, Provost, Lewis University
 

3:00–4:15 p.m.
 
Chief Academic Officers Open Mike
CAOs have an opportunity to seek advice from colleagues on specific issues and to share information regarding trends and practices on private college and university campuses.
  • Moderator: John P. Marsden, Provost, Barton College
Communicating Financial Realities to Faculty Members by Using CIC’s Financial Indicators Tool (FIT) and Key Indicators Tool (KIT)
In discussions of the reallocation of funds, trustees and faculty and staff members can benefit from the use of CIC’s KIT and FIT benchmarking reports to provide a context for good decision making. Using the Composite Financial Index and its four ratios in the FIT, CAOs can help the campus community gain perspective on the institution’s financial well-being. CAOs also can review with institutional stakeholders the data in the KIT—including average faculty salaries within the context of financial resources, percentage of part-time faculty, faculty-student ratio, instructional costs per student, and the overall expenditure per student. In this session CAOs will learn how the FIT and KIT reports can be used to facilitate discussions about an institution’s financial condition in comparison with regional and national benchmarks.
  • Allen J. Bedford, Dean of Academics and Faculty, Bryn Athyn College
  • Michael Williams, President, Austen Group
  • Chair: Edward E. Ericson, Vice President for Academic Affairs, John Brown University
Divide and Conquer—The Responsibilities of Associate Provosts and Associate Vice Presidents
With the increased responsibilities for programs and personnel that fall to the chief academic officer, the portfolio of programs managed by the assistant and associate vice presidents/provosts/deans also has expanded. Getting the job done on today’s campuses means that the CAO may no longer have the most current information on the campus assessment plan, adjunct faculty members, grants written to support undergraduate research, or the effectiveness of academic advising. A panel of CAOs and their “seconds” will explore their partnership, the decision about which responsibilities to delegate, and the benefits of collaboration. Participants will have opportunities to discuss the arrangements on their campuses and share strategies.
  • Robin Cautin, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs, Manhattanville College
  • Katie Conboy, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Stonehill College
  • Joseph Favazza, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Stonehill College
  • Gail M. Simmons, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Manhattanville College
  • Chair: Marie Joan Harris, CSJ, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Avila University
Pay Attention to Process: Revising the General Education Program
The general education program is a foundational component of a liberal arts education. Many colleges and universities link student learning outcomes in general education to the institutional mission. Linking the skills and dispositions that comprise a general education program to the learning outcomes in the undergraduate major field is equally important. What are the processes and best practices that lead to a robust general education program? How does a general education program contribute to students’ preparation to become leaders and citizens in the 21st century? What role does the CAO play in keeping the revision process moving forward as the faculty debate the proposed changes in the general education curriculum? Two CAOs will reflect on their experiences with the general education revision process and invite participants to share best practices.
  • Barbara M. Gayle, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Viterbo University
  • Lizbeth J. Martin, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Names University
  • Chair: David L. Garrison, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, LaGrange College
Preventive Law II: Best Practices in Employee Evaluation
Chief academic officers must carefully consider the legal issues for themselves and their institutions when dealing with unacceptable behavior or poor performance and the potential termination of employees. In this interactive session, an experienced higher education attorney will address the legal considerations associated with these issues and provide academic officers with the necessary tools to manage them while minimizing risk to the institution and the CAO.
  • Natasha Baker, Attorney, Hirschfeld Kramer, LLP
  • Chair: Thomas H.L. Cornman, Academic Vice President, Cedarville University
 

4:30–5:30 p.m.
 
Approaches to Increasing Student Retention
A multi-pronged approach to student retention that includes centers for teaching and learning, a centralized advising program for first-year students, peer advisors, tutoring assistance, and supplemental instruction has become a common way to increase student retention from the first to the second year. A panel of CAOs familiar with academic support programs will discuss the results on their campuses.
  • Jerry A. Hirsch, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Western New England University
  • Gerard P. O’Sullivan, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Neumann University
  • Luther S. Williams, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Tuskegee University
  • Chair: Donna B. Aronson, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota
Many Cultures on the San Antonio River
Many ethnic and national groups are represented in San Antonio history. Native American tribes made the San Antonio River basin their home base for far-ranging activities, and the river and the presence of Native Americans attracted Spaniards to the area in the early 1700s. This area also became the boundary between New Spain and Mexico and the westward movement of Euro-Americans a century later. The clash between Mexicans and Euro-Americans culminated at the Alamo. Later, German immigrants founded their own towns in the Texas hill country just north of San Antonio and naturally and easily moved to the city in the mid- and late-1800s. Decades later, Mexican immigrants renewed the Spanish-Mexican legacy. At mid-century, the Cold War military bases brought thousands of other Americans through the area, many of whom stayed and became permanent residents. An expert on Texas history will complete this brief history of San Antonio with vivid details, amazing stories, and little-known facts.
  • Gilberto M. Hinojosa, Professor of History, University of the Incarnate Word
  • Chair: John M. Burney, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Doane College
Writing a Successful Application for a CIC-Funded Program
CIC receives many more applications for its grant-sponsored programs—such as Ancient Greece in the Modern College Classroom, the Senior Leadership Academy, and Information Fluency Workshops—than financial resources can support. How can a college make a compelling case for inclusion of its nominees in these programs? CIC senior staff will offer advice on the preparation of successful applications.
  • Richard Ekman, President, CIC
  • Barbara Hetrick, Senior Vice President, CIC
  • Chair: Robert Shippey, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Enrollment Management, Bluefield College
 

Monday, November 5
10:15–11:15 a.m.
 
The CAO’s Duty to Build Trust and Maintain Integrity
Constant among the CAO’s responsibilities—assuring program quality, meeting accreditation standards, and appointing and supporting a well-prepared faculty—is the duty to build trust and maintain integrity among students, faculty members, and other campus constituents. These qualities are neither easily measured nor obvious unless they are absent. What strategies do CAOs employ to create and preserve trust? How does integrity manifest itself in the CAO’s responsibilities? What is the relationship between academic freedom and trust? The CAOs of two institutions will share experiences from their campuses and invite participants to contribute to a discussion of effective practices.
  • Katherine S. Conway-Turner, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Hood College
  • Richard Ostrander, Provost, Cornerstone University
  • Chair: Colleen Hegranes, Senior Vice President, St. Catherine University
The CIC Degree Qualifications Profile Consortium
The Lumina Foundation’s Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) attempts to define what students should learn, understand, and know how to do at each degree level, regardless of a student’s institution or major. The DQP also provides ways for institutions to demonstrate the quality of their academic programs without governmental prescriptions of curricular content. With funding from the Lumina Foundation, the CIC/DQP Consortium, comprised of 25 member colleges and universities, seeks to test the applicability of the concept of ensuring consistent quality in the academic programs of liberal arts-oriented independent colleges and universities and to clarify student learning outcomes at the undergraduate level. Participants will learn about projects at several institutions.
  • David T. Harvey, Vice President for Academic Affairs, DePauw University
  • James J. Lakso, Provost and Executive Vice President for Student Development, Juniata College
  • Holiday Hart McKiernan, Vice President of Strategic Operations and Chief of Staff, Lumina Foundation for Education, Inc.
  • Letha B. Zook, Provost, University of Charleston (WV)
  • Chair: Arup Sen, Vice President for Academic Affairs, D’Youville College
Civic Engagement and Institutional Mission
College mission statements often emphasize the preparation of students to become productive and engaged citizens in a globalized society, with a focus on social responsibility and civic engagement. Curricular offerings provide opportunities to reflect on such issues as social justice, environmental sustainability, and poverty through experiential learning opportunities in public policy formation, community service, and internships. CAOs from a Project Pericles campus and a campus that includes civic engagement in its institutional mission statement will share with participants the role of the mission in shaping curricular and co-curricular opportunities available to undergraduate students. Participants will discuss similar opportunities at their institutions.
  • Lily McNair, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Wagner College
  • Catharine O’Connell, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Mary Baldwin College
  • Chair: Linda DeMeritt, Dean of the College, Allegheny College
Dealing with Difficult Faculty Colleagues
Campus culture often dictates how conflicts between students and faculty members and among faculty members are resolved. Who are these “difficult” faculty colleagues? What issues can best be resolved at the departmental level through the intervention of the department chair? How can department chairs be supported in carrying out this responsibility? What are the next steps when the first level of resolution fails and the conflict is now one for the CAO to address? Participants will have an opportunity to learn new skills and practice dealing with conflict.
  • Claudia DeVries Beversluis, Provost, Calvin College
  • Jeanine Silviera Stewart, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Hollins University
  • Chair: Donald B. Taylor, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Benedictine University (IL)
Leading Entrepreneurial Efforts
In today’s dynamic higher education landscape, many colleges—especially those that are tuition-dependent—recognize that they must become more entrepreneurial if they are to prosper. Initiatives may take the form of developing new programs and models of instruction, marketing the institution in novel ways, or even entering into new lines of business. How can the CAO lead or support these efforts while remaining true to the institution’s mission? What are typical points of friction, especially with respect to faculty members? Which organizational structures might hinder—or ensure—success? Senior officers of two institutions will share their experiences with nurturing new ventures.
  • Elizabeth Domholdt, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica
  • Robert Halliday, Associate Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies, Utica College
  • Judith A. Kirkpatrick, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Utica College
  • Donald W. Wortham, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, The College of St. Scholastica
  • Chair: Dominic A. Aquila, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of St. Thomas (TX)
 

11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.
 
Advancing Interfaith Cooperation
In a world of increasing religious diversity, institutions of higher education across the country are advancing interfaith cooperation. Campus leaders play a critical role in setting the vision for interfaith cooperation and providing programming consistent with that cooperation and the institutional mission. Academic and student affairs officers at two institutions will share their experiences of promoting and supporting interfaith understanding on campus through curricular and co-curricular initiatives. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss the interfaith climate on their campuses.
  • John T. Day, Provost and Academic Vice President, John Carroll University
  • Brian T. Johnson, Executive Director of Campus Ministries, Valparaiso University
  • Mark D. McCarthy, Vice President for Student Affairs, John Carroll University
  • Mark R. Schwehn, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Valparaiso University
  • Chair: Cheryl Johnson-Odim, Provost, Dominican University (IL)
Another Perspective on Academic Program Review: What Happens to the Results?
Review of academic programs at regular intervals is accepted as good practice, and on most campuses it follows a five- to seven-year cycle. What does the review process look like and what happens to the recommendations made during the reviews? Who is responsible for acting on the recommendations? Participants will learn about successful academic program review processes and have an opportunity to exchange ideas.
  • Dean de la Motte, Provost, Salve Regina University
  • Diane Fladeland, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Mary (ND)
  • Chair: Robert J. Graham, Provost, Waynesburg University
The CIC Degree Qualifications Profile Consortium (repeated session)
The Lumina Foundation’s Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) attempts to define what students should learn, understand, and know how to do at each degree level, regardless of a student’s institution or major. The DQP also provides ways for institutions to demonstrate the quality of their academic programs without governmental prescriptions of curricular content. With funding from the Lumina Foundation, the CIC/DQP Consortium, comprised of 25 member colleges and universities, seeks to test the applicability of the concept of ensuring consistent quality in the academic programs of liberal arts-oriented independent colleges and universities and to clarify student learning outcomes at the undergraduate level. Participants will learn about the individual projects at several institutions.
  • David T. Harvey, Vice President for Academic Affairs, DePauw University
  • James J. Lakso, Provost and Executive Vice President for Student Development, Juniata College
  • Holiday Hart McKiernan, Vice President of Strategic Operations and Chief of Staff, Lumina Foundation for Education, Inc.
  • Letha B. Zook, Provost, University of Charleston (WV)
  • Chair: B. Connie Allen, Provost, St. Augustine’s University
Success with First-Generation Transfer Students
The 2008 CIC/Walmart College Success Awards provided grants to 20 competitively selected institutions to extend, deepen, or strengthen efforts that help first-generation students succeed in college. In 2010, a second round of awards was made to 30 institutions that had established a track record of success in recruiting, retaining, and graduating first-generation students. Several campuses focused their programs on first-generation transfer students. CAOs from two institutions will present the structure of their programs for transfer students, discuss the challenges of working with a first-generation population, and suggest strategies that can be employed on other campuses.
  • Philip J. Belfiore, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mercyhurst University
  • Leanne M. Neilson, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California Lutheran University
  • Chair: Sandra C. Greer, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Mills College
Using Smart Technology to Increase Course Offerings in World Languages
Low enrollment in world language courses can prevent a college from offering a breadth of languages and depth in any single language. To help overcome this challenge, five independent colleges in Texas are using high-definition videoconferences, thereby hoping to preserve the “high touch” element that is a hallmark of education in a liberal arts college. These institutions are working with the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) to explore important research and implementation issues across academic, logistical, technological, financial, and curricular dimensions. CAOs from two of the participating campuses will describe their responses to these issues and how shared programming has surmounted many obstacles to maintaining strong world language departments.
  • Rebecca Frost Davis, Program Officer for the Humanities, NITLE
  • Allen H. Henderson, Provost and Senior Vice President, Texas Wesleyan University
  • Charles McCormick, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Schreiner University
  • Chair: Bryon Grigsby, Senior Vice President and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Shenandoah University


Tuesday, November 6
9:0010:15 a.m.
 
Evaluating Academic Advising
Academic advising is a key component of student retention and post-graduation success, but the quality of academic advising often is not evaluated as part of a faculty member’s teaching, scholarly activity, or service. Participants will learn about rubrics some institutions use to evaluate academic advising and explore the impact of evaluating advising on the comprehensive assessment of faculty members’ work.
  • Lauren C. Bell, Associate Dean of the College, Randolph-Macon College
  • Robert L. Entzminger, Provost, Hendrix College
  • Peg Falls-Corbitt, Associate Provost for Engaged Learning, Hendrix College
  • William T. Franz, Provost, Randolph-Macon College
  • Chair: Kerry D. Fulcher, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Point Loma Nazarene University
Faculty Workload Considerations
Increasing responsibilities for faculty members with additional assignments, such as coordinating re-accreditation activities, serving on ad hoc committees, serving as an interim department or division chair, or teaching a one-time overload, fall outside the traditional parameters used to calculate workload, which usually are based on the number of hours or courses taught, faculty committee service, and the percentage of time dedicated to scholarly activity. Regular teaching overloads and differential teaching loads in graduate programs also create more variables in the calculation. How can workload issues be resolved in equitable ways? How can faculty-friendly policies be developed? What role does shared governance play in establishing workload formulas? Two CAOs will share their experiences and engage participants in discussion.
  • Andrea Chapdelaine, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Albright College
  • Alan P. Runge, Provost, Concordia University (TX)
  • Chair: Sally Weaver Sommer, Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs, Bluffton University
Opportunities to Develop Leadership within the Faculty
Within the framework of shared governance, faculty members are encouraged to step into leadership roles as department chairs, members of institution-wide committees, and mentors to junior faculty members. The ability to develop leaders from within the campus community strengthens shared governance and encourages faculty members to consider leadership roles in their own career plans. Participants will learn about innovative leadership opportunities and share ideas for similar programs on their home campuses.
  • Susan Agre-Kippenhan, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Linfield College
  • Nayef Samhat, Provost, Kenyon College
  • Anne A. Skleder, Provost, Cabrini College
  • Chair: Marc Roy, Provost, Goucher College
Smart Internationalization: Be Strategic about Global Expansion
There is little disagreement within U.S. higher education that colleges and universities must be “globally engaged” to compete in the 21st century. Internationalization is a challenging process, however, especially for smaller colleges with limited budgets and infrastructure. The Institute of International Education’s 2009–2010 Open Doors Report on International Exchange reports that only 196 of the 600 CIC member institutions sent ten or more students overseas, indicating a need to connect more CIC colleges with appropriate overseas opportunities. Participants will learn about innovative approaches that actively engage students and faculty members in study and training overseas. How can summer study periods be used more effectively for meaningful experiences overseas while overcoming financial constraints and delayed graduation? Where can overseas programs be offered to give students the types of expertise they need to be competitive in their careers? How can colleges choose partner institutions in locations that are safe, not overwhelmed with tourists, and affordable? What forms of funding are available to support students and faculty members to pursue these opportunities?
  • Kirsten Brecht, Vice President for Marketing, American Councils for International Education (American Councils)
  • Dan E. Davidson, President, American Councils
  • Robert O. Slater, Senior Consultant for Policy Research, American Councils
  • Chair: Jeffrey Frick, Dean of the College and Academic Vice President, St. Norbert College