Registration Information

​Please download the Registration Request Form and a list of Consortium Registration Contacts. Advisors should submit completed forms to the registrar’s office at a student's home institution, which will then complete the registration process. Students will receive a confirmation of enrollment from the institution that is offering each course. Registration deadlines vary by course.

Courses Listed by Academic Discipline

​African American Studies

​Claflin University ​Introduction to Black Feminist Thought


Art History

​Carlow University20th Century Art in the United States

​Clarke UniversityEmbracing the Subtitle: An Advanced Introduction to World Cinema
[not offered in 2017–2018]

​Concordia University TexasPursuit of the Invisible: Romanticism in Visual Art & Literature

​Wesleyan CollegeGreek and Roman Art


Asian American Studies

​St. Olaf CollegeDigital Asia in America
[offered Fall 2017]


Classics

​Randolph-Macon College Introduction to Classical Myth

​Wesleyan CollegeGreek and Roman Art


English and Literature

​Bloomfield College Women's Literature

​Bloomfield CollegeThe Art of Drama/“Sticking it to the Man”: Contemporary Social Drama, 1960-1999

​Carroll CollegeLiterature of the American Dream

​Claflin UniversityMen and Masculinity in Literature

​Concordia University TexasPursuit of the Invisible: Romanticism in Visual Art & Literature

​Concordia University Texas Shakespeare

​Lasell CollegeClassics of World Literature

​Mount Mary UniversityMarriage, Money, and Mystery: Studies in the British Novel

​Northwestern CollegeLinguistic Perspectives on English

​Rosemont CollegeModern American Literature

​Shenandoah UniversityGender and Women’s Literature


Film Studies

​Clarke University Embracing the Subtitle: An Advanced Introduction to World Cinema
[not offered in 2017–2018]

​Randolph-Macon CollegeFrancophone Cinema from North Africa

​Siena CollegeSpanish-Speaking World through Film


French

​Randolph-Macon College Francophone Cinema from North Africa

​Siena CollegeQuébec Civilization

​Simpson CollegeGrowing up in WWII France


Gender Studies

​Bloomfield College Women's Literature

​Claflin University Introduction to Black Feminist Thought

​Claflin University ​Men and Masculinity in Literature

​Rosemont CollegeHistory of Gender in the United States

​Shenandoah UniversityGender and Women’s Literature

​Shenandoah UniversitySex, Gender, and Religion


History

​Carroll University Renaissance and Reformation Europe

​Gettysburg College The Native American–European Encounter in North America

​Mount Mary UniversityPower, Responsibility, and Exploitation: Britain’s Age of Empire

​Rosemont CollegeHistory of Gender in the United States

​Ursuline CollegeGlobalization and Place: Past, Present, and Future

​Walsh UniversityThe History of Medicine

​Wesleyan CollegeAmerican Wars in the 20th Century


Italian Studies

​Gettysburg College Italian Culture: Bella Figura, Sprezzatura, La Chiesa and a Whole Lot More


Philosophy

Carroll College Modern Philosophy: Reason, Freedom, and Tolerance

​Carroll UniversityEthics, Values, and Justice

​Clarke UniversityApplied Ethics: Biomedicine

​Northwestern CollegePhilosophy and Science Fiction

​Simpson College “That’s Not Fair!”: An Exploration of Theories of Justice

​St. Edwardʼs UniversityLegal Ethics

​Walsh University Bioethics


Religion

Carlow University Christianity and American Society

​Shenandoah UniversitySex, Gender, and Religion

St. Olaf College ​Jesus and the Moral Life

Ursuline CollegeThe History of Christianity


Spanish

Lasell College Advanced Spanish

St. Edwardʼs UniversityMexican Literature of the 20th and 21st Centuries: Revolutionaries, Visionaries, and Renegades

Course Descriptions by Institution


​Bloomfield College


English and Literature/gender studies


Institution: Bloomfield College (Bloomfield, NJ)
Course: Women's Literature (ENG 223/WMS 223)
Instructor: Angela Conrad, Professor of English and Women’s Studies

This course focuses on literature in English written by women. We will study themes and techniques common to literature by women and the gender studies subjects individual authors treat. From the late Middle Ages until the present, we will examine texts that challenge beliefs about female inferiority, promote a women's perspective on gender, and allow for a discussion of self-esteem, motherhood, privacy, and women's power.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-year composition course(s).

Note: For Bloomfield College students, fulfills general education competency of Aesthetic Appreciation.

Course Dates: January 11–May 7, 2018
Credits/Units: 1 course unit, 4 credits
Registration Period: November 13, 2017–January 17, 2018

Contact the Instructor: Angela_Conrad@bloomfield.edu

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English and Literature


Institution: Bloomfield College (Bloomfield, NJ)
Course: The Art of Drama/“Sticking it to the Man”: Contemporary Social Drama, 1960-1999 (ENG 252)
Instructor: Fiona Harris-Ramsby, Assistant Professor of Writing

In this class, we will study a period in American theatre from 1960-1999, when civil rights issues preoccupied the stage in terms of race and identity. We call this Political or Social Drama. Social Drama offers an affective site, a living laboratory that enables audiences to observe the enactment of cultural issues.

As August W. Straub points out in his reference to Greek culture and their preoccupation with the seeing/understanding capacity of dramatic practice, “To see a thing is to understand that thing.” Samuel Weber explains this concept further; he reminds us that, “The term theater has the same etymology as the term theory, from the Greek word ‘thea,’ designating a place from which to observe and see.” Theatre then, in Weber’s view—a view this class will share—has the capacity for the critique of human experience in embodied practice. Consequently, we will read, evaluate, and perform (in purely digital settings) sociopolitical plays (and musicals) that examine the human experience in order to initiate social change and social justice.

Course Dates: January 11–May 7, 2018
Credits/Units: 1 course unit, 4 credits
Registration Period: November 13, 2017–January 17, 2018


Contact the Instructor: Fiona_Harris-Ramsby@bloomfield.edu

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Carlow University


Religion


Institution: Carlow University (Pittsburgh, PA)
Course: Christianity and American Society (TH 360)
Instructor: John Alverson, Professor of Theology

This course is an exploration of the relationship between Christianity and the American Experiment. Historical, theological, cultural, political, and sociological questions will be addressed as they pertain to this relationship. The student will be introduced to both classical and contemporary Christianity as it has negotiated, participated in, and contributed to the American religious experience.

Course Dates: January 8–May 4, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 30, 2017–January 21, 2018

Contact the Instructor: jwalverson@carlow.edu

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Art History


Institution: Carlow University (Pittsburgh, PA)
Course: 20th Century Art in the United States (AR 249)
Instructor: Sylvia Rhor, Associate Professor of Art History

This course examines visual art (primarily painting and photography) in the United States in the 20th century. Following a chronological format, we begin with the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and end with a discussion of 9/11 memorials. Students will study modern art movements such as Regionalism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimalism, as well as postmodern art production that defies and questions the “isms” of modernist movements. Throughout, we place special emphasis on race, class, gender and the socio‐political context of art making and art reception. In addition, we highlight the importance of art institutions, exhibitions, and art collecting in shaping culture in the U.S. in the 20th century; the concept of collecting forms the basis for the class signature project as well. The intersection and critical analysis of art and identity (personal and national) is a strong focus in this class. Student will engage with this issue through required resources, discussions, and class projects.

Course Dates: January 8–May 4, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 30, 2017–January 21, 2018

Contact the Instructor: scrhor@carlow.edu

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​Carroll College


Philosophy


Institution: Carroll College (Helena, MT)
Course: Modern Philosophy: Reason, Freedom, and Tolerance (PHIL 389)
Instructor: Edward Glowienka, Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Most of us take for granted that freedom and tolerance are important social values. When we disagree, it is generally over their grounds and limits. In this course, we look to the early modern origins of our notions of political and religious freedom in order to explore the range of ways these values have been conceived and defended. More specifically, this course explores the hypothesis that how one conceives of tolerance depends on how one understands the operations and limits of human reason. In short, we explore the possibility that epistemology shapes political and social theory in major (if underappreciated) ways.

Our focus will be on writings from the 17th and 18th centuries. In this period, philosophers were simultaneously dealing with changes in their understanding of science and reason, on the one hand, and changes in the relationship between the state and religious authorities, on the other, a confluence which makes the period nearly perfect for unpacking the connections between reason, freedom, and tolerance. Our goal is both to understand the lessons of the 17th and 18th centuries in their native context and to use these lessons to better understand how reason, freedom, and tolerance interrelate in our own time.

This is a special topics course which substitutes for our standard PHIL 303: Modern Philosophy offering.

Prerequisites: One prior philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

Course Dates: January 16–May 10, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 1, 2017–January 12, 2018

Contact the Instructor: eglowienka@carroll.edu

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English and Literature


Institution: Carroll College (Helena, MT)
Course: Literature of the American Dream (ENLT 397A)
Instructor: Kevin C. Stewart, Associate Professor of English

“I’ve spent most of my creative life measuring the distance between that American promise and American reality,” singer Bruce Springsteen said at a political rally in 2008. As if he did not already exist in the line of American troubadour poets, this statement makes explicit how Springsteen sees his role in the late 20th and early 21st centuries: a man continuing the tradition of poet Walt Whitman, America’s preeminent chronicler, and other writers of several genres. This online course, designed also to meet general literature requirements as per the English department, seeks to establish what the “American promise” or American Dream is, what the “American reality” is, how they have evolved into the 21st century, and where they may be headed in the future.

Prerequisites: ENWR 102 and ENLE 200 or consent of the instructor.

Course Dates: January 16–May 10, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 1, 2017–January 12, 2018

Contact the Instructor: kstewart@carroll.edu

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​Carroll University


History


Institution: Carroll University (Waukesha, WI)
Course: Renaissance and Reformation Europe (HIS 217)
Instructor: Scott Hendrix, Associate Professor of History

This course focuses on important changes occurring in Europe from the last quarter of the fourteenth century to the mid-seventeenth century. The period was one of educational, cultural, and religious change and reform, including the development of such important religious traditions as Lutheranism, Calvinism, and the Baptist tradition. We will explore topics through the reading of primary and secondary sources, culminating in a research project focused on secondary source research.

Course Dates: January 22–May 1, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Registration Period: November 20, 2017January 2, 2018


Contact the Instructor: shendrix@carrollu.edu
Course Syllabus to come

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Philosophy


Institution: Carroll University (Waukesha, WI)
Course: Ethics, Values, and Justice (PHI 206)
Instructor: Kevin Guilfoy, Associate Professor of Philosophy

This class will trace the development of ethical theory in the western tradition. Students will study the origins and foundations of our notions of Autonomy, Freedom, Justice, Equality, and other key moral concepts. We will also study the different sources of moral values and how these values are represented in codes of ethical conduct.

Course Dates: January 22–May 1, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Registration Period: November 20, 2017January 2, 2018

Contact the Instructor: kguilfoy@carrollu.edu

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​Claflin University


African American Studies/Gender Studies


Institution: Claflin University (Orangeburg, SC)
Course: Introduction to Black Feminist Thought (AAAS 317/GNST 317)
Instructor: Sherietta Lane, Instructor of English

The purpose of this course are to explore the psychological and cultural aspects of the experiences of African-American women both as Black and female Americans and to examine the dynamic forces that have shaped the course of their development. Through exploration and analysis this course covers the evolution of intellectual discourse among African American women from slavery to the present. Particular attention is given to ideas about race, gender, and the economic status of black women at various time periods. Sources include autobiographies, novels, historical documents, sociological studies, and modern feminist social critiques.

Course Dates: January 10–April 27, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: Closes January 10, 2018


Contact the Instructor: smurrell@claflin.edu

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English and Literature/Gender Studies


Institution: Claflin University (Orangeburg, SC)
Course: Men and Masculinity in Literature (ENGL 308/GNST 308)
Instructor: Douglas Root, Assistant Professor of English

This course is offered as a special topic in literature and culture, where the goal is to study selected problems, issues, trends and periods within literature and culture. It emphasizes the study of literature in the English language composed by male writers who dwell upon masculinity, men’s experiences, and gender issues.

Prerequisites: ENGL 102 (English Composition II)

Course Dates: January 10–April 27, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: Closes January 10, 2018


Contact the Instructor: droot@claflin.edu

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​Clarke University


Philosophy


Institution: Clarke University (Dubuque, IA)
Course: Applied Ethics: Biomedicine (PHIL 225)
Instructor: Kent Anderson, Professor of Philosophy

Course topics include normative ethics, autonomy and medical paternalism, the use of human subjects in biomedical research, genetics and eugenics, artificial reproductive technologies, abortion and impaired infants, euthanasia and assisted suicide, and organ donation. Student outcomes include applying ethical values to biomedical issues, appreciating a diversity of moral viewpoints, and improving critical thinking skills in reference to values analysis.

Prerequisites: This is an intermediate general education course; an introductory course in philosophy is a prerequisite.

Course Dates: January 22–May 17, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 22, 2017–January 19, 2018

Contact the Instructor: kent.anderson@clarke.edu

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Art History/Film Studies


WILL NOT BE OFFERED IN 2017–2018


Institution: Clarke University (Dubuque, IA)
Course: Embracing the Subtitle: An Advanced Introduction to World Cinema (ARHS 280)
Instructor: Bryan J. Zygmont, Associate Professor of Art History

In this course, students will watch, discuss, and analyze some of the real landmarks in world cinema (that is, movies not in the English language that feature subtitles) and place them within cultural and artistic contexts. Discussions will (primarily) focus on four different film makers from four different countries: Ingmar Bergman (Sweden), Krzysztof Kieslowski (Poland), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), and Andrei Tarkovsky (Russia). In addition, students will listen to lectures via podcasts, observe instructional Kaltura videos (delivered through the Moodle LMS), and engage in discussion forums that will allow the opportunity to interact with their instructor and connect with, learn from, and challenge one another. A student who successfully completes this course will acquire an advanced vocabulary that will him or her to discuss and analyze all forms of cinema, domestic and otherwise. This is a 16 week completely online course.

Course Dates: January 22–May 17, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 22, 2017–January 19, 2018

Contact the Instructor: bryan.zygmont@clarke.edu
Course Syllabus
Instructor's CV
Program Website
Instructor's Website

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Concordia University Texas


Art History/English and Literature


Institution: Concordia University Texas (Austin, TX)
Course: Pursuit of the Invisible: Romanticism in Visual Art & Literature (ENG 4351)
Instructors: Christopher Fitzgerald, Assistant Professor of Art; Jeffrey Utzinger, Assistant Professor of English

This course introduces students to the study of a topic in literature chosen by the instructor. It requires the close examination and exploration of the chosen topic through reading, discussing, and composing critical responses to key texts. The class is designed as a survey of the history of Romanticism in art and literature, with emphasis on major artists and authors, and their works from the late-18th to the mid-19th century.

Prerequisites: ENG 1317 (Introduction to Literature) or equivalent

Note: There will be several optional synchronous (real-time) meetings via Google Hangouts, but alternate viewing options will be available if students are unable to participate in the live session.

Course Dates: March 5–April 29, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 11, 2017–March 4, 2018


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English and Literature


Institution: Concordia University Texas (Austin, TX)
Course: Shakespeare (ENG 3323)
Instructors: Kelly Carolyn Gordon, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Leadership; Brandy Alba, Assistant Professor of English

Reading and interpretation of major Shakespearean plays, both as literature and as blueprints for production. Emphasis will be placed on page-to-stage analysis, understanding of the playwright’s use of imagery and characterization, and the social context of the plays.

Course Dates: March 5–April 29, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 11, 2017–March 4, 2018



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​Gettysburg College


Italian Studies


Institution: Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
Course: Italian Culture: Bella Figura, Sprezzatura, La Chiesa and a Whole Lot More (ITAL-260)
Instructor: Alan R. Perry, Professor of Italian

Exploration of some of the most influential examples of Italian history, literature, art, music, film, and philosophy in their historical context, from the Roman period to the present, with emphasis on the 20th century. Students will come away with a familiarity of a wide range of Western culture’s most celebrated accomplishments, a solid appreciation of Italian history, and an enriched ability to think critically about their own culture. Taught in English.

Note: Gettysburg College students are expected to attend face-to-face sessions on MWF at 10:00–10:50 a.m. Eastern time, which will be broadcast simultaneously for students at other institutions. Each session will be video-recorded and posted as well. Students in the face-to-face sessions should bring a laptop computer to access video materials. Some required readings are not available in digital format so students will need to make sure they have access to these materials in advance.  

Course Dates: January 23–May 3, 2018
Credits/Units: 1 unit, 4 credit hours
Registration Period: Closes February 2, 2018

Contact the Instructor: aperry@gettysburg.edu

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History


Institution: Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
Course: The Native American–European Encounter in North America (HIST-230)
Instructor: Timothy Shannon, Professor of History

This course focuses on encounters and adaptations between native American and European peoples in North America from 1500 to the present. Topics include the demographic consequences of contact; impact of European trade, religion, and war on native societies; relations between native Americans and the U.S. government; and the question of native American identity in the modern world.

Note: This course will include a weekly synchronous meeting using video conferencing technology. Meetings are tentatively scheduled for Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Eastern time. Please confirm with the instructor.

Course Dates: January 23–May 3, 2018
Credits/Units: 1 unit, 4 credit hours
Registration Period: Closes February 2, 2018

Contact the Instructor: tshannon@gettysburg.edu

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Lasell College


English and Literature


Institution: Lasell College (Newton, MA)
Course: Classics of World Literature (ENG340)
Instructor: Jennifer Gerstel, Assistant Professor of English

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on topics such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. This is a presentation-intensive course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level English course.

Course Dates: January 17–May 8, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: Opens November 13, 2017

Contact the Instructor: jgerstel@lasell.edu

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Spanish


Institution: Lasell College (Newton, MA)
Course: Advanced Spanish (SPAN311)
Instructor: José R. Guzmán, Associate Professor of Spanish

Students in this course study composition and conversation, with emphasis on the Hispanic cultures and their contribution to world civilizations. Geography, history, and the artistic evolution of Spain and Latin America are presented through readings, literary texts, and visual materials.

Prerequisites: SPAN 212 or SPAN 202 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

Course Dates: January 17–May 8, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: Opens November 13, 2017


Contact the Instructor: joguzman@lasell.edu

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Mount Mary University


English and Literature


Institution: Mount Mary University (Milwaukee, WI)
Course: Marriage, Money, and Mystery: Studies in the British Novel (ENG 347)
Instructor: Paula Reiter, Associate Professor of English

While we often associate the term “Victorian” with the prim and proper, students will discover through reading Victorian novels that nothing could be further from the truth. The Victorians lived in a time of tremendous upheaval, and their literature both reflected and shaped their responses to change. Students will read six novels clustered around themes of marriage, money, and mystery: Pride and Prejudice, Middlemarch, David Copperfield, North and South, The Moonstone, and The Hound of the Baskervilles. These themes will be explored within the larger context of Victorian history and culture. Students will also discuss the development of the novel from Austen to Conan Doyle, coming to an understanding of a variety of novel forms (romantic, realistic, multiplot, industrial, sensational, and detective). By the end of the semester, students will be able to articulate what they share with the energetic, ambitious, obsessive, anxious, complex humans we call the Victorians.

Course Dates: January 16–May 10, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credits
Registration Period: November 20, 2017–January 23, 2018

Contact the Instructor: reiterp@mtmary.edu

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History


Institution: Mount Mary University (Milwaukee, WI)
Course: Power, Responsibility, and Exploitation: Britain’s Age of Empire (HIS 348)
Instructor: Julie Tatlock, Assistant Professor of History

This course will explore the history of the British Empire from the sixteenth century to the twentieth century, investigating how a small country came to politically and economically dominate the world for more than three hundred years. The course also will explore the impact of British empire-building on those who were forced to become members of the empire. Finally, students will explore the empire’s demise after two great world conflicts in the early twentieth century and what was left in its wake.

Course Dates: January 16–May 10, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credits
Registration Period: November 20, 2017–January 23, 2018


Contact the Instructor: tatlockj@mtmary.edu

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​Northwestern College


Philosophy


Institution: Northwestern College (Orange City, IA)
Course: Philosophy and Science Fiction (PHI 319)
Instructor: Randy Jensen, Professor of Philosophy

An introduction to some central philosophical problems through the medium of science fiction. Philosophy and science fiction are kindred spirits. Both are inspired by a sense of wonder and force us to see what’s familiar in new and surprising ways. In this class we explore some of the following familiar science fiction topics: virtual reality, space travel and time travel, extraterrestrial life and intelligence, artificial life and intelligence, the impact of technology on humanity and on society, and more.

Note: For Northwestern College students, this course satisfies the Integrative General Education option under Belief and Reason.

Course Dates: January 8–May 9, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Registration Period: Opens October 25, 2017


Contact the Instructor: rjensen@nwciowa.edu

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English and Literature


Institution: Northwestern College (Orange City, IA)
Course: Linguistic Perspectives on English (ENG 345)
Instructor: Michael Kensak, Professor of English

In this course, we learn the rudiments of language study, trace the history of English, and gain a rigorous appreciation for the power of words. We follow the English language from its origin in a warlike Germanic tribe to its present state as the dominant medium of international communication. We learn the historical reasons for our goofy spelling. We explore how war and colonization gave English the largest word-hoard of any modern language. We sample varieties of English across America and around the world. And we challenge common assumptions about nature of language and language change. Along the way, we tell Word Stories, learn to read basic Old and Middle English, recast Romeo and Juliet as a battle of Early Modern pronouns, and confront the devastation of the world’s linguistic ecology.

Course Dates: January 8–May 9, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Registration Period: Opens October 25, 2017


Contact the Instructor: kensak@nwciowa.edu

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​Randolph-Macon College


Classics


Institution: Randolph-Macon College (Ashland, VA)
Course: Introduction to Classical Myth (CLAS 223)
Instructor: Bartolo Natoli, Assistant Professor of Classics

The principal Greek and Roman myths concerning creation, the underworld, the gods, and the heroes will be read and interpreted with consideration given to their use in ancient and modern literature, art, and music.

Course Dates: February 12–May 17, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 25, 2017–February 19, 2018

Contact the Instructor: BartoloNatoli@rmc.edu

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French/Film Studies


Institution: Randolph-Macon College (Ashland, VA)
Course: Francophone Cinema from North Africa (FREN 378)
Instructor: Sandrine Teixidor, Professor of French and Francophone Studies

When examining Francophone Cinema and African cinema, one of the challenges becomes to differentiate what can be considered African cinema, North African cinema, Arab cinema and the cinema from the Middle East. While these regions may seem at first sight to share a similar history and culture, upon further examination they differ drastically in traditions and histories and reveal diverse identities. This course will investigate the filmic production of North Africa (mostly Algeria and Tunisia) and West Africa (mostly Senegal, Ghana and Cameroon) in order to compare their characteristics from an artistic and narrative perspective.

Students will examine and learn about the historical background of Algeria, Tunisia and West African in order to understand the struggles that citizens and filmmakers have faced over time to create Art. They will also learn to analyze films and be asked to develop their own interpretation and critique of the body of works examined in class. Close attention will be paid to portrayals of gender, violence, terror and terrorism, and issues of nationalism, identity, censorship and power among others. Students will be asked to recognize and understand the genre chosen by filmmakers (realism, comedy, propaganda, satire, etc.).

Prerequisites: The course will be taught in French at the 300 level as a traditional face-to-face class; students must complete at least French 232 (Conversation) and French 240 (Introduction to Literature), or equivalent, to enroll in this class.

Course Dates: February 12–May 17, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 25, 2017–February 19, 2018


Contact the Instructor: steixidor@rmc.edu

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​Rosemont College


English and Literature


Institution: Rosemont College (Rosemont, PA)
Course: Modern American Literature (ENG 0395)
Instructor: Katherine Baker, Assistant Professor of Writing

This seminar will survey American writing between the world wars, considering the works of Frost, Cummings, Stevens, Williams, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner, among others. The course attempts to place these writers and their works within the context of the most important literary movements of the time. Students will learn to identify key literary movements and will critically read and discuss texts from these movements that helped to define “American literature” for years to come. Students also will learn to pinpoint similarities in style and technique as well as trace literary themes.

Course Dates: January 10–April 30, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 30, 2017–January 18, 2018


Contact the Instructor: kbaker@rosemont.edu

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History/Gender Studies


Institution: Rosemont College (Rosemont, PA)
Course: History of Gender in the United States (HIS 0326)
Instructor: Michelle Moravec, Associate Professor of History

This seminar investigates the histories of women and gender in the United States through primary and secondary source analysis. Our inquiry into the past will be framed around the theoretical and methodological questions of the field of U.S. Women’s and Gender History. Particular attention will be paid to how the activities of diverse groups of women, both publically and privately, transformed their lives and opportunities, as well as shaped gender roles. We will also explore how historians themselves began to write women’s history differently as they incorporated the concept of gender.

Course Dates: January 10–April 30, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 30, 2017–January 18, 2018


Contact the Instructor: mmoravec@rosemont.edu

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​Shenandoah University


English and Literature/Gender Studies


Institution: Shenandoah University (Winchester, VA)
Course: Gender and Women’s Literature (ENG/GWST 329)
Instructor: Sarah Canfield, Assistant Professor of English

This course will study literary works that engage with concepts of gender, including but not limited to representations of femininity, masculinity, and non-normative gender identities, from the perspective of literature written by women. Traditional literary history focuses predominantly on the contributions of men to the literary canon, but women have always been writing as both a part of that canon and in criticism of it. Through the reading of texts written by and about women, we will interrogate how gender and the representation of gender inflect the reading and writing of literature. Texts under consideration may include fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction.

Prerequisites: Earned grade of “C-” or better in ENG 101.

Course Dates: January 19–May 17, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 8, 2017–January 12, 2018


Contact the Instructor: scanfiel@su.edu

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Religion/Gender Studies


Institution: Shenandoah University (Winchester, VA)
Course: Sex, Gender, and Religion (REL/GWST 341)
Instructor: Meredith Minister, Assistant Professor of Religion

This course examines understandings of sex and gender in religious communities, including Christian and Muslim communities, and in religious texts, including biblical and qur’anic texts, exploring the intersection of religious and social understandings of sex and gender.

Note: There will be 4–5 synchronous (real-time) meetings during the semester, at times to be scheduled.

Course Dates: January 16–May 6, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 8, 2017–January 12, 2018

Contact the Instructor: mministe@su.edu

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​Siena College


Film Studies


Institution: Siena College (Loudonville, NY)
Course: Spanish-Speaking World Through Film (FILM 370)
Instructor: Marcela T. Garcés, Associate Professor of Spanish

This course, taught in English, includes the study of selected subtitled films, which will be utilized as a visual and aural source to learn about social justice issues in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will learn about the history, politics, and social issues of Spanish speaking populations in Latin America, Spain, and the United States. The geographical emphasis will shift among the various Spanish-speaking regions of the world. Possible broad themes include memory, oppression, self-discovery, immigration, exile, identity, assimilation, women’s rights, dictatorship, GLBTQ issues, and indigenous rights. With its roots in the ideals of the Franciscan tradition, this course demonstrates how to critically analyze social justice issues in cultural settings depicted in films from the Spanish-speaking world from a variety of perspectives.

Note: This course does not count toward Spanish major or minor. Students will need to purchase some course materials (films) online.

Course Dates: January 16–May 1, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 27, 2017– January 23, 2018


Contact the Instructor: mgarces@siena.edu

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French


Institution: Siena College (Loudonville, NY)
Course: Québec Civilization (FREN 340/FREN 341)
Instructor: Janet Shideler, Professor of French

A study of Québec through its history, geography, arts and literature, political, and social structures. Various social justice concepts, such as human rights, equality, equity, and the status of minorities, will inform our study of historical events as we consider a number of questions. What happens when the colonizer becomes the colonized? What are the consequences when cultural imperialism becomes a guiding principle of government? Do the rights of minority populations outweigh commitment to the common good?

Prerequisites: For FREN 340 (taught in French): FREN 301 (French Conversation I) or its equivalent. For FREN 341 (taught in English): none.

Note: FREN 340 counts toward the French major or minor at Siena College; FREN 341 does not count toward the French major or minor. Recorded lectures and other course content will be available in both English and French. Students enrolled in FREN 340 will complete some assignments in Englishto allow students in FREN 341 to understand what is being said and to respondand other assignments in French. Several synchronous (real-time) meetings will be required for students enrolled in FREN 340 to provide sufficient oral practice in the target language. The culminating experience for FREN 340 and FREN 341—a debate for and against Québec sovereignty—will most likely take place synchronously as well.

Course Dates: January 16–May 1, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 27, 2017–January 23, 2018

Contact the Instructor: jshideler@siena.edu

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​Simpson College


French


Institution: Simpson College (Indianola, IA)
Course: Growing up in WWII France (FREN 290)
Instructor: Sharon Wilkinson, Professor of French

During much of World War II, France was occupied by the Germans. French people disagreed among themselves over whether they should help or hinder Hitler’s efforts to “purify” Europe. What was it like to grow up in France during this strange time of intense conflict and distrust? Through films, memoirs, a research project, and communication with native speakers who lived in France under Nazi occupation, students will work to answer this question, pushing their French skills to the next level in order to learn more about a different culture and a unique period of history. This course assumes that students have already developed some basic skills in listening, reading, writing, and speaking French, and are familiar with present and past tenses, adjective agreements, and pronouns. This course will review and build on this knowledge, adding more complex grammar forms and increasing vocabulary. But most of all, students will learn what it was like to live under Nazi occupation during a terrible time in French history.

Prerequisites: Two semesters of beginning French or permission of the instructor.

Note: Students are required to participate in weekly synchronous meetings scheduled around the students’ availability (2–4 students per group); students will arrange their group meeting times. There will also be one synchronous meeting of the whole class in April to interview a WWII survivor whose memoir the class reads. 

Course Dates: January 9–April 26, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credits
Registration Period: November 1–December 1, 2017

Contact the Instructor: sharon.wilkinson@simpson.edu

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Philosophy


Institution: Simpson College (Indianola, IA)
Course: “That’s Not Fair!”: An Exploration of Theories of Justice (PHIL 290)
Instructor: Allison B. Wolf, Associate Professor of Philosophy

If you walk by any playground, you will likely hear a child declare: “That is not fair!” They sound so confident that they know what constitutes justice and fairness, but in actuality, philosophers have struggled with this issue for millennia. What is just? How should a just society be structured? This course will be about exploring how different philosophers and philosophical traditions have assessed and answered these questions from the ancient Greece to the present day. More specifically, the course will do this by examining theories of justice from ancient Greek philosophers, social contract theorists, feminist and critical race scholars, and colonial studies.

Prerequisites: None, but it is strongly recommended to have taken at least one philosophy course.

Note: Requires 6–8 synchronous sessions to be scheduled around the availability of the enrolled students.

Course Dates: January 9–April 26, 2018
Credits/Units: 4 credits
Registration Period: November 1–December 1, 2017


Contact the Instructor: allison.wolf@simpson.edu

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​St. Edwardʼs University


Philosophy


Institution: St. Edwardʼs University (Austin, TX)
Course: Legal Ethics (PHIL 3301)
Instructor: Jack Musselman, Associate Professor of Philosophy

This course will help students to understand: 1) the relationship of law and morality, 2) notions of justice in different legal philosophies, 3) the potential corruption of law by ideology, and 4) contemporary ethical quandaries of practitioners.

Course Dates: January 16–May 10, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: August 1–August 15, 2017

Contact the Instructor: jackgm@stedwards.edu

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Spanish


Institution: St. Edwardʼs University (Austin, TX)
Course: Mexican Literature of the 20th and 21st Centuries: Revolutionaries, Visionaries, and Renegades (SPAN 4303)
Instructor: Georgia Seminet, Associate Professor of Spanish

The goal of this course is to introduce students to major authors of Mexican narrative fiction of the 20th and 21st centuries, covering the most distinctive traits of Mexican literature, significant authors, and important trends and developments of the period. Beginning with the historical roots of the Mexican Revolution and the text that exemplifies the revolutionary period, Los de abajo (Mariano Azuela, 1915), and ending with the narconovela by Elmer Mendoza, Balas de plata (2008), this course will survey some of the most important aesthetic and ideological movements that characterize Mexican literature. Students will learn about the historical, cultural, and literary contexts of this period and engage in textual analysis of the novels and short stories chosen for the course.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3330 (Advanced Grammar) or permission of instructor.

Note: The course will be taught in Spanish and all class discussions will be conducted in Spanish. For St. Edward’s students, it will meet the requirements for a general education literature course as well as counting toward the major or minor in Spanish.

Course Dates: January 16–May 10, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: August 1–August 15, 2017

Contact the Instructor: georgias@stedwards.edu

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​St. Olaf College


Religion


Institution: St. Olaf College (Northfield, MN)
Course: Jesus and the Moral Life (REL 276)
Instructor: James Hanson, Associate Professor of Religion

This course examines the ethical teachings of Jesus with close attention to their historical, literary, and theological contexts. It also sets Jesus’ moral teachings in the context of the Western ethical tradition, and brings them to bear on the task of contemporary ethical reflection. Issues examined may include non-violence, social and economic justice, sexuality, and racial and ethnic conflict.

Course Dates:February 8–May 23, 2018
Credits/Units: 1 course credit
Registration Period: November 1, 2017–February 7, 2018

Contact the Instructor: hansonj@stolaf.edu

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Asian American Studies


WILL BE OFFERED IN FALL 2017

Institution: St. Olaf College (Northfield, MN)
Course: Digital Asia in America (AS 223)
Instructor: Ka Wong, Associate Professor of Asian Studies

This course combines digital humanities and Asian American studies to explore the multiple cultural and historical productions of Asia in America. Students will critically examine topics such as ethnic identities, stereotypes, diasporas, citizenships, pop cultures, body images, sexuality, practices of different Asian communities, and various contemporary issues through a wide range of learning activities.

Course Dates: September 7–December 19, 2017
Credits/Units: 1 course credit
Registration Period: April 7–August 31, 2017

Contact the Instructor: wongk@stolaf.edu

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​Ursuline College


Religion


Institution: Ursuline College (Pepper Pike, OH)
Course: The History of Christianity (RS 342.01)
Instructor: Lisa Marie Belz, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

This course offers a survey of the significant events that have shaped the development of Christianity from its origin as a minority sect within late Second Temple Judaism to its present status as the world’s largest global religion with more than two billion adherents. The focus of the course is on the core moments and issues which shaped Christianity into the diverse expressions of Christian life and practice in view around the world today. Additionally, contemporary issues are addressed in terms of their impact on Christianity’s continued growth in post-colonial Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Course Dates: January 16–May 5, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 14, 2017–January 15, 2018

Contact the Instructor: lbelz@ursuline.edu

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History


Institution: Ursuline College (Pepper Pike, OH)
Course: Globalization and Place: Past, Present, and Future (HI 488.01)
Instructor: Timothy Kinsella, Professor of History

This course focuses on globalization and its interactions with various places and their inhabitants. It includes an examination of definitions; a brief history of globalization; a study of its various economic, political, social and cultural, and ecological dimensions; and their many combinations. Both the dimensions of globalization and places and their inhabitants influence and shape each other. Implications of these interactions are examined from market and justice perspectives.

Course Dates: January 16–May 5, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 14, 2017–January 15, 2018

Contact the Instructor: tkinsella@ursuline.edu

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​Walsh University


History


Institution: Walsh University (North Canton, OH)
Course: The History of Medicine (HIST428)
Instructor: Rachel Constance, Assistant Professor of History

This reading intensive course will examine the development of modern Western medicine through a survey of its intellectual traditions, global influences, and technological roots, as well as a critical analysis of its impact on the modern world. It will include an examination and analysis of medical challenges in the modern era, particularly epidemic disease and public health.

Course Dates: January 8–April 29, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 20, 2017–January 16, 2018

Contact the Instructor: rconstance@walsh.edu

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Philosophy


Institution: Walsh University (North Canton, OH)
Course: Bioethics (PHIL304)
Instructor: Leslie Whetstine, Associate Professor of Philosophy

This seminar is designed to be an interdisciplinary study of what science can do versus what science ought to do. Exponential advances in medical-scientific knowledge and technology present many questions and problems that must be considered from the viewpoint of philosophical ethics.

Course Dates: January 8–April 29, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: November 20, 2017–January 16, 2018

Contact the Instructor: lwhetstine@walsh.edu

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​Wesleyan College


Art History/Classics


Institution: Wesleyan College (Macon, GA)
Course: Greek and Roman Art (ARH 325)
Instructor: Libby Bailey, Professor of Art History

A study of art and architecture from the rise of Greek civilization to the fall of the Roman Empire. Course goals: To acquire a knowledge of the artists, monuments, and works of art of the civilizations of Greece and Rome. To gain an understanding of the patterns of stylistic development, of the historical and cultural significance of major monuments and political sources of iconography, and to acquire the ability to discuss and analyze works of architecture, statuary, relief sculpture, vase painting, mosaic, metal work, and wall painting from both periods.

Course Dates: January 8–May 8, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 30, 2017January 12, 2018

Contact the Instructor: lbailey@wesleyancollege.edu

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History


Institution: Wesleyan College (Macon, GA)
Course: American Wars in the 20th Century (HIS 352)
Instructor: Nicholas Steneck, Associate Professor of History

This course examines the theory, experience, and memory of American wars in the twentieth century. Upon successful completion of this course students will understand the American experience with armed conflicts in the twentieth century and the factors that account for the different ways the country thought about and waged war during this period. They will analyze how a variety of factors—including gender, race, socioeconomic status, and geographical origin—shaped individual and collective experiences of war. They will also understand and be able to analyze and discuss the different ways in which Americans have remembered their wartime experiences, and how and why memorialization and commemoration have changed over time.

Course Dates: January 8–May 8, 2018
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Registration Period: October 30, 2017–January 12, 2018

Contact the Instructor: nsteneck@wesleyancollege.edu

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