Registration Information

​Please download a copy of the Registration Guidelines and Registration Form. The guidelines are designed for both students and advisors. The form should be completed , scanned, and returned to Kevin Gannon, Consortium Coordinator, at kgannon@cic.nche.edu. CIC will coordinate all enrollments and confirm all registrations with students and their institutions. Please contact Gannon for more information.

Courses Offered in Fall 2017

​HISTORY


Grand View University
HIST 349 – The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1877
Kevin Gannon, Department of History
August 24December 14

Course Description

This course is an intensive survey of US history from 1848 to 1877, covering the origins and course of the Civil War and subsequent efforts at Reconstruction. Students will have the opportunity to engage with both primary and secondary historical sources in an attempt to untangle the complicated narratives of race, liberty, and Union in this pivotal and violent era. Particular attention will be paid to the North American West and its pivotal role in both the coming of the Civil War and efforts at national reunification and expansion afterwards.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Kevin Gannon headshotKevin Gannon is Professor of History and Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa. He earned his PhD at the University of South Carolina and has taught this era of US and North American history in South Carolina, Massachusetts, Texas, and Iowa—and in the process learned that each of these regions approaches the memory of the Civil War in significantly different ways! An award-winning instructor, he has extensive experience in online teaching and developing programs to train faculty in online teaching and learning.


HISTORY


Elizabethtown College
HIS 371A – Contemporary China
David Kenley, Department of History
Fall 2017

Course Description

In this course we will investigate contemporary Chinese society, defined as the post-Mao era, with a focus on history, politics, economics, social structures, and culture. Upon successfully completing this course, each student will be able to analyze the political, economic, societal, and cultural structures of contemporary China; understand the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class inform individual and collective identities; demonstrate a knowledge of the beliefs, values, and issues that influence Chinese society; develop and nurture his or her critical reading, writing, and speaking skills; and understand China’s impact as a world power.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

David Kenley headshotDavid Kenley is Professor of History at Elizabethtown College, where he also directs the Center for Global Understanding and Peacemaking. Originally from Salt Lake City, Kenley lived for many years in West Virginia, Hawaii (earning his PhD from the University of Hawaii), and the Republic of China (Taiwan). His research focuses on the history of Asia, particularly modern China. He is the author of New Culture in a New World: The May Fourth Movement and the Chinese Diaspora in Singapore (2002), Modern Chinese History (2012), and Contested Communities: Identities, Spaces, and Hierarchies of the Chinese in the Cuban Republic (co-authored with Miriam Herrera Jerez and Mario Castillo Santana, 2017). Fluent in Chinese, he enjoys taking students to study in Beijing each year.


HISTORY


University of St. Francis
HIST 304Z – Twentieth Century Europe: Reconciling the Paradox of Destruction and Promise
Debra Workman, History Program
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course explores twentieth century European history, including the major events, phenomena, and figures that shaped this tumultuous period. The emphasis, however, is not only on the ideas, events, and people that most influenced and shaped Europe and the modern world, but also their impact on every person living in Europe. Students will engage as a “community of learners” in the online format, developing critical skills of communication and teamwork through discussion groups and role-playing that simulate the choices and constraints that confronted ordinary people in times of upheaval and transition, influencing what they thought and believed and how they acted. Viewing the complex interrelation between the political and the personal promotes both a social and historical awareness of the forces that shape and influence human actions.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Debra Workman headshotDebra Workman is Associate Professor of History at the University of St. Francis, where she has taught since 2007. Her PhD is from the University of Kansas and her research focuses on France during World War II. In 2012 she received a Curt and Else Fellowship for Faculty from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. She writes: “I’ve discovered the online format is ideal for developing empathy for and understanding of one of the most complicated times in European history, a time that reverberates to the present day.”


Music


St. Michael’s College
MU 247 – History of Rock
William Ellis, Department of Fine Arts
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course examines the historical, social, cultural, and musical forces that contributed to the emergence and subsequent development and impact of rock and roll as an enduring form of popular music. Students will come away with a firm understanding of historical trends, change, and innovation in rock, and they will be able to better identify and analyze rock music based on performer, genre, era, and influence. Lectures, videos, readings, presentations, guest speakers, and a comprehensive selection of several hundred songs will take the student from the birth of rock through the British Invasion and the psychedelic Sixties to punk, grunge, and more.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

William Ellis headshotWilliam L. Ellis is associate professor in music at Saint Michael’s College, where he has taught since 2011. He has a Master of Music from the University of Cincinnati’s College–Conservatory of Music and a PhD in musicology and Southern regional studies from the University of Memphis. For many years he was also the music writer for the Memphis Commercial Appeal. Ellis continues to record and perform as a professional fingerpicking guitarist and singer, and his songs have been licensed for film and television. Among his honors are First Place Arts & Entertainment Winner in the Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Awards, a Keeping the Blues Alive Award from the Blues Foundation, and Australian BlueStar Award for best international CD, and inclusion in the Oxford American’s best music of Tennessee issue.

PHILOSOPHY


University of St. Francis
PHIL 494 — Philosophy of War and Peace
Timothy Weldon, Philosophy Program
Fall 2017 (and Fall 2018)

Course Description

This course is an introduction to understanding the stark contrast between the realities of war and peace through the prism of Just War Theory. This survey course will discuss the basic historical and situational problems, ethical and moral concepts, proponents and advocates, impediments and obstacles, ideals and objectives, and the overall existential vocabulary of war and peace. Issues and topics to be treated include the meaning and value of human life, the dignity of the human person, religious influences in war and peace, the understanding of death, human freedom, philosophy of good and evil, human solidarity, justice and international law, origins of historical and current conflicts, and the definition, history and application of Catholic Just War Tradition.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Tim Weldon headshotTim Weldon is professor of Philosophy and chair of the Department of Theology at the University of St. Francis. He received his undergraduate degree in government from Saint Mary’s College of California and graduate degrees in philosophy from the University of Dallas. Weldon also studied International Relation at Schiller University in Paris, France, and maintains an avid interest in international relations and peace and security studies. His publications include books on Duns Scotus, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, and the Franciscan intellectual tradition, essays on aesthetics and many other topics, as well as works of fiction. He has taught at the University of St. Francis for over 15 years and has been teaching online for more than a third of that time.

RELIGION


Moravian College
REL 225 – Pilgrimage: Searching for God in a (Post)modern World
Kelly Denton-Borhaug, Department of Religion
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course will provide students with the opportunity to study and reflect on the relationship between Christian thought and (post)modern life. Students will look at the way supposedly “secular” culture makes reference to “signals of transcendence,” and expresses longing for spiritual meaning, focusing on the changing nature of “pilgrimage” and its relationship to religious authority, theology, spiritual conviction, tourism and movement, and the role of culture. Students will embark upon their own pilgrimage as a part of their class work, in addition to studying diverse sites and pathways of pilgrimage (secular and religious) in the United States and world.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Kelly Denton-Borhaug headshotKelly Denton-Borhaug is Associate Professor of Religion and co-director of the peace and justice studies minor at Moravian College. She writes: “As I was thinking about developing this course, I simultaneously began to explore pilgrimage personally as well as a new research and teaching area. I decided to augment my understanding by real-time exposure, and travelled to Spain’s historic pilgrimage route, the Camino of Santiago of Compostela in Northern Spain. I walked over 300 miles with other pilgrims and had an amazing experience that made me think that students could also share, if in a less intense experience. Simultaneously, I began to think that this was a course that had the potential to work well as an online course, and began to imagine just how it could be constructed for this format. I’ve taught the course now about five times, and every time I think that students and I gain so much from an online experience that simultaneously is deeply embodied in the physical process of pilgrimage.”



Courses Offered in Spring 2018

ART HISTORY


McDaniel College
AHY 3365 — Ways of Seeing Byzantium
Gretchen McDaniel, Professor of Art and Art History
Spring 2018

Course Description

This course will examine the art and architecture of the early Christians and Byzantine Empire. We will examine the art through theological, philosophical, and artistic lenses, and we will also examine how others saw the Byzantines in our final module. Discussion boards, papers, projects and debates will be the focus of this class.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Gretchen McKay headshotGretchen Kreahling McKay is chair of the art and art history department at McDaniel College and a speaker and consultant on active learning in the higher education classroom. She received a BA in art from Colby College and MA and PhD in the history of art from the University of Virginia. Among other accomplishments, she brought the "Reacting to the Past" series, which immerses students in historical events through role-playing, to McDaniel College and is the author of one of the series’ games, "Modernism vs. Traditionalism: Art in Paris, 1888-89"—now in use in many colleges and universities nationwide.McKay was the 2015 recipient of The Ira G. Zepp Distinguished Teaching Award, the college's top teaching award. She is also the faculty mentor to the McDaniel College Green Terror football team.

HISTORY


St. Michael’s College (VT)
HIST 332 — History of the American Family
Susan Ouellette, Professor of History
Spring 2018

Course Description

Perennially, politicians, clergy and welfare reform advocates have filled the airwaves with multiple renditions of "the American family is in trouble" sermons. Although their view of exactly what is troubling the American family (and their solutions) often differs—sometimes radically—all of these "family advocates” assume that their audience has a universal understanding of what constitutes "family." Yet, do we Americans really agree in our definition of "family"? Do we really harbor nostalgia for the ideal family of the past? In this course students will explore the plurality of American families both past and present. They will examine the concept of "family" as an institution that has been constituted and re-constituted as demographic, social, political, gendered, or economic trends affected it. In the process, they will also examine our contemporary vision of "family," including their own.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Susan Ouellette headshotSusan Ouellette is an expert in Early American history, including the first settlement up to the American Revolutionary period; Native American and women’s history; the experience of Francophone immigrants in the Northeast; and diaries and memoirs. She is the author of U.S. Textile Production in Historical Perspective: A Case Study from Massachusetts (2007) and An Extraordinary Ordinary Woman: The Journal of Phebe Orvis, 1820-1830 (2017). She was educated at SUNY Plattsburgh and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

HISTORY


Lesley University
CHIST 3450 — History of International Humanitarian Organizations
Kimberly Lowe, Assistant Professor of History
Spring 2018

Course Description

What does it mean to bring humanity to times of crisis and conflict? From the protection of prisoners of war during the First World War, to relief for Syrian refugees today, humanitarian aid has had a profound effect on the social, legal, and ethical development of the modern world. This advanced seminar examines the history of international humanitarian organizations like the International Committee of the Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders from 1863 to the present. We will interrogate a set of tensions that continue to characterize humanitarian relief today: the conflict between traditional principles and contemporary human rights; the role of governments in the provision of foreign aid; and the difficulties of enforcing the humanitarian protections of international law during sectarian conflicts.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Kimberly Lowe headshotKimberly Lowe teaches courses on European history, international history, international law, and human rights/humanitarianism. Her research (and a book in manuscript) focuses on the history of international humanitarian aid provision after the First World War. Lowe received her BA from Pepperdine University and her PhD from Yale University, and she has held fellowships at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, and the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. Her research has put her in touch with current aid practitioners working for the International Committee of the Red Cross, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Doctors Without Borders, and other organizations. This online course is dedicated to the men and women who risk their lives to provide aid during conflict, both in the past and present.

Music


St. Michael’s College
MU 249 — History of Gospel Music
William Ellis, Department of Fine Arts
Spring 2018

Course Description

In this online course, you will explore one of the most beautiful and moving legacies in all of music literature: the centuries-long story of African American sacred song from the ring shout to holy hip-hop. You will hear its history and engage with its appeals for freedom, justice, and social progress. You will hear and know both the differences—and connectedness—between spirituals and gospel songs, quartets and choirs, street corner evangelists and Pentecostal preachers, and between the often-shifting lines of the gospeland blues worlds. Mostly, you’ll come away a fan, versed in gospel’s many classic songs and performers and able to hear its long, ongoing influence on everything from rock to rap. Asynchronous and self-paced in design, this course fulfills the Historical Studies LSC requirement for students at Saint Michael's College.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

William Ellis headshotWilliam L. Ellis is associate professor in music at Saint Michael’s College, where he has taught since 2011. He has a Master of Music from the University of Cincinnati’s College–Conservatory of Music and a PhD in musicology and Southern regional studies from the University of Memphis. For many years he was also the music writer for the Memphis Commercial Appeal. Ellis continues to record and perform as a professional fingerpicking guitarist and singer, and his songs have been licensed for film and television. Among his honors are First Place Arts & Entertainment Winner in the Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Awards, a Keeping the Blues Alive Award from the Blues Foundation, and Australian BlueStar Award for best international CD, and inclusion in the Oxford American’s best music of Tennessee issue.

RELIGION/PHILOSOPHY


Elizabethtown College
REL 393 — Indian Philosophy
Jeffery D. Long, Professor of Religion and Asian Studies
Spring 2018

Course Description

This course will present an overview of the major systems of philosophy that have developed in the Indian subcontinent, from antiquity to the present. These include Vedic philosophies, Jainism, Buddhism, skeptical thought, and the interactions amongst all of these schools. Themes covered will include each systems concept of reality (ontology), theories of knowledge (epistemology), ideas of the good life (ethics), and the ways in which each system conceives of difference: Why are there many perspectives on these questions? Another recurring theme will be the relationship of philosophical reflection to embodied spiritual practice and the ways in which Indian philosophy is both similar to and different from Western philosophy.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Jeffery Long headshotJeffery Long teaches courses on Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism (Dharma Traditions), a first-year seminar on Star Wars and Asian philosophy, Sanskrit, and Comparative Theology and Interfaith Engagement at Elizabethtown College. He is the author of three books and a wide array of articles on Hinduism, Indian philosophy, and religious pluralism, and a consulting editor Sutra Journal. In addition to his academic and spiritual interests, he is an avid fan of science fiction and fantasy and classic rock. He also likes cats. He was educated at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago.