Registration Information

​Please download a copy of the Registration Guidelines and Registration Form. The guidelines are designed for both students and advisors. The form should be completed , scanned, and returned to Kevin Gannon, Consortium Coordinator, at kgannon@cic.nche.edu. CIC will coordinate all enrollments and confirm all registrations with students and their institutions. Please contact Gannon for more information.

Courses Offered in Fall 2017

​HISTORY


Grand View University
HIST 349 – The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1877
Kevin Gannon, Department of History
August 24December 14

Course Description

This course is an intensive survey of US history from 1848 to 1877, covering the origins and course of the Civil War and subsequent efforts at Reconstruction. Students will have the opportunity to engage with both primary and secondary historical sources in an attempt to untangle the complicated narratives of race, liberty, and Union in this pivotal and violent era. Particular attention will be paid to the North American West and its pivotal role in both the coming of the Civil War and efforts at national reunification and expansion afterwards.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Kevin Gannon headshotKevin Gannon is Professor of History and Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa. He earned his PhD at the University of South Carolina and has taught this era of US and North American history in South Carolina, Massachusetts, Texas, and Iowa—and in the process learned that each of these regions approaches the memory of the Civil War in significantly different ways! An award-winning instructor, he has extensive experience in online teaching and developing programs to train faculty in online teaching and learning.


HISTORY


Elizabethtown College
HIS 371A – Contemporary China
David Kenley, Department of History
Fall 2017

Course Description

In this course we will investigate contemporary Chinese society, defined as the post-Mao era, with a focus on history, politics, economics, social structures, and culture. Upon successfully completing this course, each student will be able to analyze the political, economic, societal, and cultural structures of contemporary China; understand the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class inform individual and collective identities; demonstrate a knowledge of the beliefs, values, and issues that influence Chinese society; develop and nurture his or her critical reading, writing, and speaking skills; and understand China’s impact as a world power.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

David Kenley headshotDavid Kenley is Professor of History at Elizabethtown College, where he also directs the Center for Global Understanding and Peacemaking. Originally from Salt Lake City, Kenley lived for many years in West Virginia, Hawaii (earning his PhD from the University of Hawaii), and the Republic of China (Taiwan). His research focuses on the history of Asia, particularly modern China. He is the author of New Culture in a New World: The May Fourth Movement and the Chinese Diaspora in Singapore (2002), Modern Chinese History (2012), and Contested Communities: Identities, Spaces, and Hierarchies of the Chinese in the Cuban Republic (co-authored with Miriam Herrera Jerez and Mario Castillo Santana, 2017). Fluent in Chinese, he enjoys taking students to study in Beijing each year.


HISTORY


University of St. Francis
HIST 304Z – Twentieth Century Europe: Reconciling the Paradox of Destruction and Promise
Debra Workman, History Program
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course explores twentieth century European history, including the major events, phenomena, and figures that shaped this tumultuous period. The emphasis, however, is not only on the ideas, events, and people that most influenced and shaped Europe and the modern world, but also their impact on every person living in Europe. Students will engage as a “community of learners” in the online format, developing critical skills of communication and teamwork through discussion groups and role-playing that simulate the choices and constraints that confronted ordinary people in times of upheaval and transition, influencing what they thought and believed and how they acted. Viewing the complex interrelation between the political and the personal promotes both a social and historical awareness of the forces that shape and influence human actions.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Debra Workman headshotDebra Workman is Associate Professor of History at the University of St. Francis, where she has taught since 2007. Her PhD is from the University of Kansas and her research focuses on France during World War II. In 2012 she received a Curt and Else Fellowship for Faculty from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. She writes: “I’ve discovered the online format is ideal for developing empathy for and understanding of one of the most complicated times in European history, a time that reverberates to the present day.”


Music


St. Michael’s College
MU 247 – History of Rock
William Ellis, Department of Fine Arts
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course examines the historical, social, cultural, and musical forces that contributed to the emergence and subsequent development and impact of rock and roll as an enduring form of popular music. Students will come away with a firm understanding of historical trends, change, and innovation in rock, and they will be able to better identify and analyze rock music based on performer, genre, era, and influence. Lectures, videos, readings, presentations, guest speakers, and a comprehensive selection of several hundred songs will take the student from the birth of rock through the British Invasion and the psychedelic Sixties to punk, grunge, and more.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

William Ellis headshotWilliam L. Ellis is associate professor in music at Saint Michael’s College, where he has taught since 2011. He has a Master of Music from the University of Cincinnati’s College–Conservatory of Music and a PhD in musicology and Southern regional studies from the University of Memphis. For many years he was also the music writer for the Memphis Commercial Appeal. Ellis continues to record and perform as a professional fingerpicking guitarist and singer, and his songs have been licensed for film and television. Among his honors are First Place Arts & Entertainment Winner in the Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Awards, a Keeping the Blues Alive Award from the Blues Foundation, and Australian BlueStar Award for best international CD, and inclusion in the Oxford American’s best music of Tennessee issue.


PHILOSOPHY


Moravian College
PHIL 292 – God and the Problem of Evil
Bernie Cantens, Department of Philosophy
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course will focus on the problem of evil: If God is omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect, how can there be so much evil in the world? This question remains one of the most difficult for theists to answer. In this course, students will study and reflect on some of the most influential and important arguments around this topic. The course includes readings from classical sources, such as Aquinas, Leibniz, and Hume, and from some of the most prominent contemporary philosophers of religion, such as Alvin Plantinga, William Hasker, Richard Swinburne, Eleanore Stump, Paul Draper and William Rowe. At the end of the course, students may come to a better understanding of the world, the meaning (or lack of meaning) of life, and the possibility (or lack of possibility) of the existence of God.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Bernie Cantens headshotBernie Cantens is Professor of Philosophy at Moravian College. His areas of specialization are late-Medieval Spanish philosophy, philosophy of religion, American pragmatism, and ethics. Cantens earned his PhD from the University of Miami and has published over 30 scholarly articles, book chapters, and reviews in his areas of specialization. In 2013 he served as president of the Society for Philosophy of Religion. He also has extensive experience teaching online, offering nearly a dozen online courses over the past seven years.


PHILOSOPHY


University of St. Francis
PHIL 494 — Philosophy of War and Peace
Timothy Weldon, Philosophy Program
Fall 2017 (and Fall 2018)

Course Description

This course is an introduction to understanding the stark contrast between the realities of war and peace through the prism of Just War Theory. This survey course will discuss the basic historical and situational problems, ethical and moral concepts, proponents and advocates, impediments and obstacles, ideals and objectives, and the overall existential vocabulary of war and peace. Issues and topics to be treated include the meaning and value of human life, the dignity of the human person, religious influences in war and peace, the understanding of death, human freedom, philosophy of good and evil, human solidarity, justice and international law, origins of historical and current conflicts, and the definition, history and application of Catholic Just War Tradition.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Tim Weldon headshotTim Weldon is professor of Philosophy and chair of the Department of Theology at the University of St. Francis. He received his undergraduate degree in government from Saint Mary’s College of California and graduate degrees in philosophy from the University of Dallas. Weldon also studied International Relation at Schiller University in Paris, France, and maintains an avid interest in international relations and peace and security studies. His publications include books on Duns Scotus, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, and the Franciscan intellectual tradition, essays on aesthetics and many other topics, as well as works of fiction. He has taught at the University of St. Francis for over 15 years and has been teaching online for more than a third of that time.

RELIGION


Moravian College
REL 225 – Pilgrimage: Searching for God in a (Post)modern World
Kelly Denton-Borhaug, Department of Religion
Fall 2017

Course Description

This course will provide students with the opportunity to study and reflect on the relationship between Christian thought and (post)modern life. Students will look at the way supposedly “secular” culture makes reference to “signals of transcendence,” and expresses longing for spiritual meaning, focusing on the changing nature of “pilgrimage” and its relationship to religious authority, theology, spiritual conviction, tourism and movement, and the role of culture. Students will embark upon their own pilgrimage as a part of their class work, in addition to studying diverse sites and pathways of pilgrimage (secular and religious) in the United States and world.
Prerequisites: None.

About the Instructor

Kelly Denton-Borhaug headshotKelly Denton-Borhaug is Associate Professor of Religion and co-director of the peace and justice studies minor at Moravian College. She writes: “As I was thinking about developing this course, I simultaneously began to explore pilgrimage personally as well as a new research and teaching area. I decided to augment my understanding by real-time exposure, and travelled to Spain’s historic pilgrimage route, the Camino of Santiago of Compostela in Northern Spain. I walked over 300 miles with other pilgrims and had an amazing experience that made me think that students could also share, if in a less intense experience. Simultaneously, I began to think that this was a course that had the potential to work well as an online course, and began to imagine just how it could be constructed for this format. I’ve taught the course now about five times, and every time I think that students and I gain so much from an online experience that simultaneously is deeply embodied in the physical process of pilgrimage.”