Return to NetVUE Homepage A NetVUE Resource Page: Thinking about Vocation in a Time of Pandemic

​Last Updated: October 27, 2020

Note: some resources and links that were previously posted to this page have been removed, in order to allow space for newer, updated, or more relevant material to be added. View the archive to access previously-posted entries.

WEBINARS

NetVUE has started hosting webinars addressing particular topics of interest and concern to the wider NetVUE community: “Theological Responses to the Pandemic” (June), “Fighting the Good Fight: Social Justice, Activism, and Vocation” (July), and “Courageous Texts, Courageous Teaching” (late July). More recently, a webinar focused on “Transitions: Navigating our Vocations in an Uncertain Present” took place in September.  A webinar addressing how campuses with NetVUE grants have pivoted during the pandemic was held in October. 
These webinars can be accessed through this link (please note that the link requires a log-in)and are also available through the NetVUE online library (see the “Digital Media” folder). Coming up in December, we have a webinar addressing “The Scientific Vocation in a Time of Crisis” featuring faculty members in the natural, social, and applied sciences. This webinar will take place on Wednesday, December 2, at 3:00-4:30 pm Eastern. Faculty members and staff at NetVUE institutions can find registration information on the NetVUE Online Community.
                                         

ZOOM CONVERSATIONS and workshops

NetVUE has been hosting conversations among administrators, faculty, and staff from the various campuses based on their role or portfolio. Thus far, gatherings have been hosted for chaplains, for directors and staff at centers for vocation and/or career services, and staff working in academic affairs or student affairs. Zoom has also enabled us to host online workshops. Diversity practitioner Nimisha Barton will facilitate a workshop on “Bias, Privilege, and Educational Freedom” on October 27, at 3:00-4:15 pm Eastern. Faculty members and staff at NetVUE institutions can find registration information on the NetVUE Online Community.

If you work at a NetVUE institution and would be interested in participating in (or facilitating) a conversation with colleagues in any of these areas (or others), please contact Lynne Spoelhof, NetVUE program manager, at lspoelhof@cic.nche.edu.

VOCATION MATTERS

The NetVUE blog includes posts related to themes of vocation in times of suffering and crisis. View a (regularly updated) list of these resources. Here is a partial list of posts from the past few weeks that specifically address vocation in a time of pandemic and social upheaval:

If you have written (or are currently writing) a piece that might be appropriate for the NetVUE blog, please email Hannah Schell, NetVUE online community coordinator, at hschell@cic.nche.edu.

NETWORK ONLINE COMMUNITY: RESOURCES FOLDER

The NetVUE online community network now includes a folder for materials created by staff and faculty members at NetVUE campuses for use with students during the current pandemic. This folder is continually updated as materials are shared with us. The NetVUE online community requires a login, but anyone who works at a NetVUE member institution can obtain credentials. Click on “Library” and open the folder titled “Discussion Board Documents” in order to access a folder marked “Pandemic-related.” If you know of something that might be usefully added to this folder, please send it to Hannah Schell at hschell@cic.nche.edu. If you are not able to access the online library, please send your name, title, institution, email address, and phone number to Lynne Spoelhof at lspoelhof@cic.nche.edu, and she will provide you with login credentials.

WEBSITES AND ONLINE COMMUNITIES

These websites and communities are available elsewhere on the internet, and may be of interest to those who teach undergraduate students or work with them in areas related to vocational reflection and discernment:


ESSAYS AND BLOG POSTS ELSEWHERE ON THE INTERNET

And finally—because we all need it—a little humor: