The Verbal Art of Plato

Ancient Greece in the Modern College Classroom 6/16/20186/16/20186/16/20186/24/20186/24/20186/24/2018 Center for Hellenic Studies Nafplio, Greece
No

About the Seminar

CIC’s seminars on Ancient Greece in the Modern College Classroom are designed primarily for non-specialists to address the challenge of keeping alive in undergraduate education classical texts that a generation ago were read and understood by every college graduate. In June 2018, for the first time, the seminar will be held in Greece at the Center for Hellenic Studies (CHS) facilities in Nafplio and other locations of historical importance. The seminar is open to full-time faculty members in all disciplines who are likely to have occasion to use classical texts in their courses and may be of special interest to faculty members in the fields of archaeology, history, art history, literature, classics, theatre, and philosophy, among others, and to those who lead or are planning trips for students to Greece.

In the second century CE, Pausanias, a Greek traveler originally from Ionia, an area of Greek-speaking cities along the coast of Asia Minor, visited Greece and recorded his observations and experiences in ten guide books, beginning with his arrival in the region of Athens. His Periegesis Helládos (Description of Greece), which dates approximately from the reign of Marcus Aurelius (161–180 CE), occupies a unique position in the surviving Greek literature as a compendium of information about architecture, artifacts, traditional narratives, local history, social conventions, rituals, and genealogies. For Pausanias, the time when Athens and Sparta and their client city-states had shaped the cultural and political landscape of the Eastern Mediterranean was already in the distant past. His writings reflect a preoccupation with connecting the places and people of his time with historical events and figures from earlier eras and through that process coming to a better understanding of his own cultural legacy.

Over the course of seven days, the seminar will visit many of the places Pausanias saw, including sites in and around Argos, Olympia, Delphi, and Athens to situate what we have inherited from ancient Greek culture in its formative context. In addition to Pausanias’s descriptions, participants will read a selection of poetic, historical, and philosophical works related to each site. The seminar also will provide participants with a background in the development of Greek material culture, such as the evolution of sacred, domestic, and civic architecture, funerary practices, sculpture, and the two-dimensional representations of traditional narratives and daily life in vase paintings.

The seminar is made possible through the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Seminar Leaders

Gregory Nagy headshotGregory Nagy is Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature, professor of comparative literature, and since 2000, director of the Center for Hellenic Studies at Harvard University. He previously served as chair of Harvard’s Literature Concentration, chair of the Department of the Classics, and president of the American Philological Association (APA). His publications include The Best of the Achaeans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry, which won the APA’s Goodwin Award of Merit; Greek Mythology and Poetics; Pindar’s Homer: The Lyric Possession of an Epic Past; Poetry as Performance: Homer and Beyond; Homeric Questions; Plato’s Rhapsody and Homer’s Music: The Poetics of the Panathenaic Festival in Classical Athens; and Homeric Responses. Beginning in 2013, Harvard has offered his popular class, The Ancient Greek Hero, as a massive open online course through edX.

Kenneth Scott Morrell headshotKenneth Scott Morrell is associate professor of Greek and Roman studies at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, as well as the director of fellowships and curricular development at the Center for Hellenic Studies. In addition to publishing articles and teaching courses on ancient Greek and Latin literature, he has participated in an archaeological survey in southwestern Turkey and been active in a variety of initiatives related to
the use of information technology. Morrell was an original member of the Perseus Project and has more recently been involved with Sunoikisis and the Collaboratory for GIS and Mediterranean Archaeology Project.

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Current Status

​​

Approximately 20 full-time faculty members from CIC member institutions will be selected by competitive nomination.

Selection of participants will be announced by Friday, March 17, 2017.

Nomination Information

Up to 20 individuals will be selected by competitive nomination. Participants must be full-time, long-term faculty members at CIC member institutions, so that what is learned during the seminar will benefit the institution for many years to come. The seminar is open to faculty members from any discipline or department and may be of special interest to faculty members in the fields of archaeology, history, art history, literature, theatre, classics, and philosophy, among others, and to those who may lead trips for students to Greece. CIC member institutions that nominate individuals must be in good standing and committed to renewing CIC membership for the 2018–2019 membership year.

The chief academic officer of the nominee’s institution must nominate the faculty member who wishes to participate. Each institution may nominate more than one individual, and faculty members of all academic ranks are eligible to participate. The seminar is open to individuals who have participated in previous CIC/CHS seminars, but preference will be given to first-time participants.

To submit a nomination online, please refer to the brochure and nomination form:


The nomination deadline is Friday, January 19, 2018.

Selection of participants will be announced by Friday, February 9, 2018.

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Nomination Information

Up to 20 individuals will be selected by competitive nomination. Participants must be full-time faculty members at CIC member institutions and can be in any discipline or department.

The chief academic officer of the nominee’s institution must nominate the faculty member who wishes to participate. Each institution may nominate more than one individual, and faculty members of all academic ranks are eligible to participate. The seminar is open to individuals who have participated in previous CIC/CHS seminars, but preference will be given to first-time participants.

The nomination deadline is Friday, February 10, 2017.

Selection of participants will be announced by Friday, March 17, 2017.

To submit a nomination online, please refer to the brochure and nomination form:

Location and Expenses

The seminar will be held in Nafplio at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Greece, Harvard University, and will also include overnight excursions to Olympia, Delphi, and Athens. Please be aware that the seminar will include walking on hilly and unpaved terrain and involve periods outdoors in the hot, bright sun.

The cost of lodging, transportation to and entry fees for seminar-related excursions to archaeological sites and museums, reading materials, and most meals will be covered by CIC and CHS, thanks to the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Selected participants will be expected to make their own international travel arrangements to Athens, Greece, and CIC will reimburse participants up to $1,200 for related costs. In addition, CIC will offer a stipend of $175 to offset some daily incidental costs during the week. The only expense to participants or their institutions will be the cost of transportation and personal expenses beyond this supported amount.

Contact Information

​For questions about the seminar or the nomination process, contact Stephen Gibson, CIC director of programs, at sgibson@cic.nche.edu or (202) 466-7230.