Tenacious. Confident. Forward-looking.

2022 Institute for Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Chief Enrollment Officers 11/5/2022 11/5/2022 11/5/202211/8/202211/8/202211/8/2022 Dallas, TX
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About the Institute

The 2022 Institute for Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Chief Enrollment Officers will provide participants with the opportunity to engage with colleagues on timely and practical questions. After three years of an unpredictable pandemic that has tested everyone, we are ready to move forward with hope and bold optimism. This optimism is based on the core belief that collectively we can achieve much more than the sum of our individual efforts to support our students and advance independent higher education.

  • What is so central to institutional excellence that it must be carried tenaciously into the future?
  • What practices build confidence and deep collaboration within leadership teams and across key constituencies?
  • How do leaders and leadership teams judiciously balance tenacity with innovation and flexibility to move their campuses forward?

Institutional and student success depend on effective teamwork among chief academic, financial, and enrollment officers. Working together, they align academic programs, business models, and student goals for sustainable and mission-centered excellence. This Institute will provide teams of campus leaders with ample opportunities to work together on specific institutional priorities. It will also offer occasions for them to network with counterparts at similar institutions to exchange examples, share good practices, and assess lessons learned.

A recent survey of CIC members showed that the top concerns of presidents and chief academic officers are financial sustainability; diversity, equity, and inclusivity; and using data to increase institutional effectiveness. This year’s Institute will feature sessions and tracks that explore how chief academic, financial, and enrollment officers can collaborate to advance each of these pressing priorities.

Join colleagues from across independent higher education at the Institute for inspiration and community. Participants will return to campus refreshed and energized to advance their institution’s top priorities—as tenacious, confident, and forward-looking leaders.

Who Should Participate?

In 2022, the Institute for Chief Academic Officers welcomes chief financial and chief enrollment officers. CIC is partnering with the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and the National Association of College and University Business Officers. Cabinet-level officers who lead the academic affairs, finance and administration, and enrollment management areas at their institutions are eligible to attend regardless of their specific titles.

Special pre-Institute workshops for new chief academic officers and for those in their third or fourth years of service will be of special interest to participants in those cohorts.

To encourage teambuilding, discounted fees are available to institutions that send multiple participants.

CIC membership is not required for registration; however, only independent college and university administrators may participate.

Health and Safety

All participants in the 2022 Institute are expected to be fully up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines, including booster shots as eligible, as defined by the CDC standard on October 3, 2022. Participants should expect to be asked to acknowledge this policy and attest to their vaccination status when they register online; later they will be asked to submit vaccine verification. Please read through the below FAQs for more information.

When are participants “fully up to date” on their COVID-19 vaccines?
As defined by the CDC, people are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines when they have received all doses in the primary series and all boosters recommended for them, when eligible. Vaccine recommendations are different depending on a person’s age, the vaccine first received, and time since the last dose. Individuals can reference the CDC website to determine if they are currently fully up to date.

Is fully up to date different than fully vaccinated?
Yes. As defined by the CDC, fully vaccinated means a person has received their primary series of COVID vaccines. Fully up to date means a person has received their primary series of vaccines AND all boosters recommended for them, when eligible.

What criteria will CIC use to assess fully up to date status?
To provide the best possible chance for a safe gathering, for the Institute to be held November 5–8, 2022, CIC will use the CDC recommended vaccine protocol as of October 3, 2022, as the basis for assessment for the vaccine verification process. Please note the protocol as of October 3 may be different than it is now, and being fully up to date at the time of registration may not mean qualifying for participation in the Institute. Should CDC guidance change on October 4 or after, CIC will encourage participants to become fully up to date before the Institute but will not require it.

When and how will participants be asked to verify their vaccine status?
Approximately one month before the Institute, participants will be asked to upload their vaccine records to an online confidential, third-party, vaccine verification portal. Detailed instructions will be provided at that time.

Does CIC make exceptions to the policy?
Individuals who are medically unable to be vaccinated or boosted may seek a medical exception to the vaccine policy. For more information, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at ttruscott@cic.edu.

Featured Speakers

 

 

  • Mary B. Marcy
    Mary B. Marcy
    Dominican University of California
  • Mark D. Gearan
    Mark D. Gearan
    Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  • Robert S. Blue
    Robert S. Blue
    Centenary College of Louisiana
  • Glenn Getchell
    Glenn Getchell
    Berry College
  • Anita Jones Thomas
    Anita Jones Thomas
    St. Catherine University
  • Debbie Cottrell
    Debbie Cottrell
    Texas Lutheran University

Schedule

 

 

Connect with Institute SponsorsConnect with Institute Sponsors100
Reception for Alumni of CIC’s Executive and Senior Leadership AcademiesReception for Alumni of CIC’s Executive and Senior Leadership Academies84​Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy are invited to gather for light refreshments and conversation. <br><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI</blockquote>
Free Time for DinnerFree Time for Dinner16
Breakfast and Roundtable Discussions across Campus RolesBreakfast and Roundtable Discussions across Campus Roles99<em></em>Breakfast is provided for all Institute participants. Sunday’s roundtable discussions offer chief academic, financial, and enrollment officers, and their team members the opportunity to network with counterparts at other CIC institutions and to exchange practical advice about how to strengthen collaboration across their roles. Table prompts will guide the conversations.
Boxed Lunches and NetworkingBoxed Lunches and Networking83<p>​Boxed lunches will be provided for all Institute participants.</p>
Breakfast and Roundtable DiscussionsBreakfast and Roundtable Discussions105<p>Breakfast will be provided for all Institute participants. Roundtable discussion groups will provide opportunities to gain practical advice from colleagues. Discussion facilitators will be experienced colleagues with insight to offer on each topic. Please suggest topics, nominate a discussion leader, or volunteer to serve as one, by contacting Jonnie G. Guerra, CIC senior advisor, at <a href="mailto:jguerra@cic.edu">jguerra@cic.edu</a>.<br></p> <ul><li>Academic Recovery Practices for Student Success</li><li>Building Relationships with HBCUs to Promote Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion</li><li>Campus Solutions to Enrollment Challenges</li><li>Choosing Peer and Aspirant Institutions</li><li>Creative Partnerships for Joint Academic Programs</li><li>Dealing with Faculty and Staff Burnout</li><li>Helping Students Cope with Financial Pressures</li><li>How CIC Campuses are Balancing Budgets</li><li>Identifying New Revenue Streams</li><li>Maintaining Momentum on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives    </li><li>Managing Cabinet Transitions</li><li>New Approaches to Study Abroad</li><li>Pioneering Chief Officers as Institutional Change Agents</li><li>Reinvigorating Shared Governance Models</li><li>Revitalizing Undergraduate Research Programs</li><li>Strategic Planning Challenges for New Chief Officers    </li><li>Test-Optional Admissions</li><li>Time to Build or Time to Repurpose?</li><li>Welcoming Community College Transfer Students</li></ul>
Meetings of Affinity GroupsMeetings of Affinity Groups91<p>​<strong>New American Colleges and Universities (NACU) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet for a reception Sunday, November 6, at 6:30 p.m.</p>
Free Time for DinnerFree Time for Dinner91
Meetings of Affinity GroupsMeetings of Affinity Groups105<strong>Annapolis Group Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.<br> <blockquote>Coordinator: <strong> <em>Jeffery A. Frick</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Washington and Jefferson College<br></blockquote> <br> <strong>Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.<br><br><strong>Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Daryll H. Coleman</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lane College<br></blockquote><br><strong>New American Colleges and Universities (NACU) Chief Academic Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion. <br> <blockquote>Coordinator: <strong> <em>Sean Creighton</em></strong>, President, New American Colleges and Universities</blockquote>
Meetings of Affinity GroupsMeetings of Affinity Groups16<strong>Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 7, 6:30 p.m. for dinner and discussion.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Lori Werth</em></strong>, Provost, University of Pikeville<br></blockquote><br><strong>Council for Christian Colleges & Universities Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 7, 6:30 p.m. for dinner. <br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Stan Rosenberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Research and Scholarship, Council for Christian Colleges & Universities<br></blockquote>
Gathering and Discussion Group for Women AdministratorsGathering and Discussion Group for Women Administrators83Debbie Cottrell<em>Note: There is no fee for this event and pre-registration is not required.</em><br><br>In this inclusive event, women and those interested in issues related to women in higher education are invited to join discussion groups on current issues. Boxed lunches will be provided.<br> <blockquote>Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Patricia Parrish</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lindsey Wilson College</blockquote> <br> <h3>Those Who Give Us Hope: Improbable Journeys and Unexpected Opportunities</h3>Unexpected paths and meaningful opportunities. Framed by her personal experiences, Cottrell will draw on the friendship and leadership of two astounding women in higher education: Ruth Simmons and Nell Irvin Painter. Beyond breaking barriers and bravely doing the unexpected, these women remind us of the value of taking risks, of knowing how to use our power and our gifts, and of being rooted in connectedness, joy, and purpose.<br> <blockquote>Speaker: <strong> <em>Debbie Cottrell</em></strong>, President, Texas Lutheran University</blockquote>
Reception for NetVUE MembersReception for NetVUE Members84Representatives of institutions and organizations that are members of CIC’s Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) are invited to learn about ongoing network opportunities and to connect with leaders at other NetVUE member campuses. Refreshments will be served. <br><blockquote>Conveners: <strong><em>David S. Cunningham</em></strong>, Director of NetVUE, CIC, and <strong><em>Lynne M. Spoelhof</em></strong>, NetVUE Program Manager, CIC</blockquote>
Meetings of Affinity GroupsMeetings of Affinity Groups99 <strong>Association of Colleges of Sisters of Saint Joseph Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Monday, November 6, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion. <br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong> <em>Christopher Dougherty</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Chestnut Hill College​</blockquote>
Workshop for New Chief Academic OfficersWorkshop for New Chief Academic Officers1Workshop<a href="/2022CAOInstituteWorkshops">See the preliminary agenda and other details.</a><br><br><p> <em>Pre-Institute workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. The registration fee covers materials, meals, and refreshments. To add a workshop to an existing Institute registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.edu">ttruscott@cic.edu</a>. Fees: early rate $85 (by September 2); regular rate $110 (after September 2)</em><br><br></p><p>Chief academic officers who have served for fewer than two years are invited to participate in this workshop, led by experienced colleagues, that addresses issues that newer CAOs often face. Participants will work in small groups, analyze case studies, and discuss such topics as accreditation; assessment and institutional effectiveness; faculty governance and leadership; appointments, promotions, and tenure and its alternatives; managing time, technology, and paper; and working with peer administrators. Participants will be paired with an experienced CAO mentor. <br><br>Workshop Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Travis Frampton</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Schreiner University<br><strong><em>Lori Werth</em></strong>, Provost, University of Pikeville<br></p>
Workshop for CAOs in Their Third or Fourth Year of ServiceWorkshop for CAOs in Their Third or Fourth Year of Service1Workshop<p> <a href="/2022CAOInstituteWorkshops">See the preliminary agenda and other details.</a><br><br><em>Workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. The registration fee covers materials, meals, and refreshments. To add a workshop to an existing Institute registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at </em> <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.edu"> <em>ttruscott@cic.edu</em></a><em>. Fees: early rate $85 (by September 2); regular rate $110 (after September 2)</em><br><br></p><p>Entering the third or fourth year of service, chief academic officers usually have mastered the fundamentals of the role. At this stage, CAOs discover greater opportunities to lead rather than simply manage. What are the key questions CAOs can and should address at this stage in their careers? For example, how do CAOs balance attention to their institutions’ immediate issues with a focus on their long-term academic needs? How can CAOs attend to their own professional lives while also serving their institutions? How do CAOs work effectively with the president and other cabinet officers on strategic planning? Participants will explore these and related questions and gain fresh perspective on the next stage in their careers as CAOs.<br>    <br>Workshop Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Kimberly A. Coplin</em></strong>, Provost, Denison University <br><strong><em>John Kolander</em></strong>, Provost, Wisconsin Lutheran College<br><br>Discussion Facilitators:<br><strong><em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard Ice</em></strong>, Provost, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University <br><strong><em>Lisa Perfetti</em></strong>, Provost, The College of Wooster<br></p>
Foundational Workshops (repeated)Foundational Workshops (repeated)12WorkshopThese workshops will equip participants with the language and skills they need to respond to specific pressing issues on their campuses. The workshops are foundational in that they will outline best practices in nuanced language and take participants through the specific steps necessary to lead their campuses to implement well-conceived plans that respond to a specific challenge. Each workshop will be followed by concurrent sessions that delve more deeply into the topic. Participants are free to move between themes, stay with the same theme, or just choose any session of interest at any given time.<br><br><em>These workshops are free of charge and do not require pre-registration, but they have limited capacity. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Workshops will be repeated at 10:45 a.m.</em><br><br> <h3>Academic Programming for Financial Sustainability</h3>Academic program decisions are critical to future students, faculty, mission, and financials. How can campus leaders make sure they get them right? This session will describe best practices for evaluating markets for academic programs and will cover metrics on student demand, employment, and competition. It will describe how to estimate the effects of program decisions on an institution’s bottom line and will explore how to invest in programs that will increase enrollment and margins. The workshop also will address the impact of program choices on diversity, equity, and inclusion and share a model for estimating the cost of implementing an equitable student success initiative. Finally, participants will explore a simulator that demonstrates the impact of program decisions on budgeting and student success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Robert Atkins</em></strong>, CEO and Founder, Gray Associates<br><br>Robert Atkins leads Gray Associates and the development of Gray’s education industry software and services. He works with education clients, consulting with presidents, CAOs, CFOs, and CEMOs on program assessment, institutional strategy, pricing, and location selection. Since founding Gray Associates, Atkins has worked with institutions across all sectors of higher education, including the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, to develop institutional and programmatic growth strategies, identify new markets, and model program and course economics. He led the design of PES+ Markets, PES+ Economics, and Gray Associates Program Strategy Workshops. His new book, <cite>Start, Stop, or Grow? A Data-Informed Approach to Academic Program Evaluation and Management</cite>, was published in spring 2022.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion</h3>The curricular modules presented in this workshop will provide participants with practical tools with which to evaluate institutional structures and create transformational change. Participants will explore a variety of equity-focused tools and concepts, including cultural humility and appreciative inquiry, and use them to assess institutional structure and culture. Specific modules will help participants to create strategies that centralize diversity, equity, and inclusion in institutional processes and structures. Other modules will address overcoming backlash and other forms of resistance to change. Upon completion of the modules, participants will have developed an individualized plan to address campuswide equity and inclusion needs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Rodmon King</em></strong>, Dean of Institutional Equity and Inclusion, Connecticut College<br><br>For almost 20 years, Rodmon King has facilitated workshops and professional development sessions on cultural humility, organizational assessment, full participation, structural inequality, microaggressions and implicit bias, unearned privilege, nonviolent communication, transformational change, and appreciative inquiry. Currently the dean of institutional equity and inclusion at Connecticut College, King previously served as the interim director of the Institute for Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Transformative Practice at SUNY Oswego. He has also served on the Greater Kentucky Higher Education Recruitment Consortium advisory board as well as the steering committee for the Consortium for Faculty Diversity. King earned his MA and PhD in philosophy from the University of Rochester.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Collegiate Mental Health in the Past Decade: Recent Trends, the Impact of COVID-19, and Next Steps</h3>This workshop will review a brief history of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) and present the latest findings on trends in student mental health and the impact of COVID-19. The workshop will then examine widely documented increases in mental health problems and demand for counseling services over the past two decades. Finally, the presenter will explore implications pertaining to mental health resource allocation, multi-layered support options, and future directions for research. The CCMH at Penn State University is an international practice-research network of more than 700 colleges and universities whose mission is to bridge the gap between science and practice in college counseling centers. CCMH collects and analyzes de-identified data as part of the routine practice when students seek mental health treatment at colleges and universities. The information is used, in turn, to benefit college counseling centers, administrators, researchers, the public, and most importantly the students receiving services.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Brett E. Scofield</em></strong>, Executive Director, The Center for Collegiate Mental Health, Pennsylvania State University<br><br>Brett E. Scofield has devoted nearly his entire career to collegiate mental health, working as a clinician and administrator within numerous university-based counseling centers over the past 18 years. He currently serves as associate director of the Penn State Center for Counseling and Psychological Services as well as executive director of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH). Scofield has played a significant role within CCMH for the past eight years, contributing to several publications on the topic of college student mental health and helping the center develop numerous tools that are widely used by college counseling centers nationally to advocate for services. In addition, threat assessment and management are a particular interest of Scofield’s, having served on the Threat Assessment Teams at two major universities since 2012. Scofield earned a PhD in clinical-community psychology from Wichita State University.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Tenacious Independent Education</h3>While the private, nonprofit higher education sector may identify as being independent of government, it is in fact more dependent on federal support for campuses and students than perhaps ever before. At the same time, campus communities are deeply affected by the seismic political shifts happening in our nation. How can campus leaders successfully navigate this intersection and ensure that their campus recognizes today’s political landscape while maintaining effective relationships with elected officials, students, faculty members, and staffs?<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Barbara K. Mistick</em></strong>, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)<br><br>Barbara K. Mistick became president of NAICU in 2019. During the past two years, Mistick led independent higher education through the COVID-19 pandemic, collaborating with all sectors of the higher education eco-system to secure over $77 billion in relief funds from Congress. Working together with NAICU members across the United States throughout this crisis, she ensured fair and equitable treatment for the nation’s 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities and the more than 5 million students they serve. Mistick also enhanced NAICU’s communication efforts and virtual tools to keep members informed of federal efforts and opportunities for assistance. These efforts were critical to ensuring the health and safety of our nation’s campuses and the communities they serve. Over the course of her 30-year career in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, Mistick has been an entrepreneur, educator, and leader at institutions such as Wilson College (PA), the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, the H.J. Heinz School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University, the National Education Center for Women in Business at Seton Hill University, and at various businesses she managed or founded.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Using Data for Institutional Effectiveness</h3>This workshop will focus on the foundations of institutional effectiveness and how campus leaders can pause, reflect, evaluate, and innovate as institutional effectiveness practices are adapted to challenges higher education is facing now and into the future. Student success, retention, equity, and quality are at the forefront of conversations on many campuses and in higher education itself. Ways to engage campus-wide participation focused on these issues will continue to be part of larger strategic conversations as higher ed moves beyond this moment and onto other challenges that await.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Bethany Miller</em></strong>, Director of Institutional Research and Assessment, Macalester College<br><br>Bethany Miller is director of institutional research and assessment at Macalester College in Minnesota. With a focus on equity and inclusion as well as assessment, she has published, presented, and consulted, building on her work experiences at Cornell College and Mary Baldwin University. Supported by a PhD in education with an emphasis on research, evaluation, statistics, and assessment, her work lays a foundation for collaboration to build shared understanding and use of data to strengthen student and institutional success. Miller is co-authoring a book on equity-centered collaboration in the use of data to inform student and institutional success. She currently chairs the Higher Education Data Sharing Consortium (HEDS) board; she is concluding her service as steering committee chair for the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) of the Upper Midwest and as a member of AIR’s Nominations and Elections Committee.</blockquote>
Meetings of Chief Academic Officers, Chief Financial Officers, and Chief Enrollment OfficersMeetings of Chief Academic Officers, Chief Financial Officers, and Chief Enrollment Officers8
Welcome DinnerWelcome Dinner3<p>Immediately following the keynote address, greet old friends and meet new colleagues at this combination reception and dinner.<br></p>
Boxed Lunches with Discussion GroupsBoxed Lunches with Discussion Groups88<em></em>Boxed lunches will be provided for all Institute participants. <br> <br>Roundtable discussion groups will provide opportunities to gain practical advice from colleagues. Discussion facilitators will be experienced colleagues with insight to offer on each topic. Please suggest topics, nominate a discussion leader, or volunteer to serve as one, by contacting Jonnie G. Guerra, CIC senior advisor, at <a href="mailto:jguerra@cic.edu">jguerra@cic.edu</a>.<br> <ul><li>Academic Recovery Practices for Student Success</li><li>Building Relationships with HBCUs to Promote Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion</li><li>Campus Solutions to Enrollment Challenges</li><li>Choosing Peer and Aspirant Institutions</li><li>Creative Partnerships for Joint Academic Programs</li><li>Dealing with Faculty and Staff Burnout</li><li>Helping Students Cope with Financial Pressures</li><li>How CIC Campuses are Balancing Budgets</li><li>Identifying New Revenue Streams</li><li>Maintaining Momentum on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives    </li><li>Managing Cabinet Transitions</li><li>New Approaches to Study Abroad</li><li>Pioneering Chief Officers as Institutional Change Agents</li><li>Reinvigorating Shared Governance Models</li><li>Revitalizing Undergraduate Research Programs</li><li>Strategic Planning Challenges for New Chief Officers    </li><li>Test-Optional Admissions</li><li>Time to Build or Time to Repurpose?</li><li>Welcoming Community College Transfer Students</li></ul>
Senior Leadership AcademySenior Leadership Academy89Workshop<em>(by invitation)</em><br><strong></strong><br>The opening seminar for the 2022–2023 cohort of CIC’s Senior Leadership Academy (SLA) will precede and overlap with the Institute. SLA participants are welcome to participate in the remainder of the Institute at a reduced registration fee.<br><br>SLA is a yearlong professional development program for mid-level administrators in any division of a CIC member institution who aspire to senior leadership positions in independent colleges or universities. SLA is offered jointly by CIC and the American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI).<br> <blockquote>Director: <strong> <em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI</blockquote>
Senior Leadership AcademySenior Leadership Academy90Workshop<em>(by invitation)</em><br><strong></strong><br>The opening seminar for the 2022–2023 cohort of CIC’s Senior Leadership Academy (SLA) will precede and overlap with the Institute. SLA participants are welcome to participate in the remainder of the Institute at a reduced registration fee.<br><br>SLA is a yearlong professional development program for mid-level administrators in any division of a CIC member institution who aspire to senior leadership positions in independent colleges or universities. SLA is offered jointly by CIC and the American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI).<br> <blockquote>Director: <strong> <em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI</blockquote>
Institute RegistrationInstitute Registration93
Meetings of Affinity GroupsMeetings of Affinity Groups94<strong></strong><strong>Concordia University System Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers</strong> will meet Saturday, November 5, 10:00 a.m.–Noon.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Tim Preuss</em></strong>, Provost, Concordia University Nebraska<br></blockquote><br><strong>Marpeck Mennonite Chief Academic Officers</strong> will meet Saturday, November 5, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. <br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>Ann Vendrely</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, Goshen College<br></blockquote>
CIC Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Enrollment Officers Task Force MeetingCIC Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Enrollment Officers Task Force Meeting96<p>​Convener: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Chair, CIC Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Chief Enrollment Officers Task Force and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University</p>
Reception for SponsorsReception for Sponsors97CIC greatly values its partnerships with sponsoring companies and organizations that serve small and mid-sized independent colleges and universities. As an expression of gratitude for their generous support, all sponsors of the Institute are invited to gather for celebration and conversation. Drinks and dessert will be available.<br><blockquote>Hosts: <strong><em>Marjorie Hass</em></strong>, President, CIC and the <strong><em>CIC Chief Academic Affairs with Chief Financial and Chief Enrollment Officers Task Force</em></strong></blockquote>
Institute RegistrationInstitute Registration98
Christian Worship ServicesChristian Worship Services82<h3>​Roman Catholic Mass </h3><h3> <br>Ecumenical Service</h3><blockquote> Convener: <strong> <em>John S. Vassar</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor</blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions103Concurrent SessionThe below listing of sessions planned to date will be held on Sunday, November 6, or Tuesday, November 8. (The sessions on Monday, November 7, are aligned with the Foundational Workshop topics). As additional speakers and sessions are confirmed and as sessions are assigned to specific time slots, this website will be updated.<br> <div> <span> <div> <br> </div> <h3>Attracting and Retaining a Student Population that Meets Academic, Enrollment, and Financial Needs</h3>Within independent higher education, institutions are unique in their missions, in who they serve, and how they program the educational experience for their students. It is essential to manage enrollment to ensure that enough tuition is generated to keep the institution in operation, particularly at institutions with smaller endowments and fewer avenues for generating revenue. This panel will discuss the importance of and examples of strategic collaboration between academic affairs, enrollment management, and business affairs working in alignment to attract and retain cohorts of students who can benefit from the academic program and generate the tuition required to run the institution.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Andrew R. Bressette</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment Management, Berry College<br><strong><em>Cindy Marlow McClenagan</em></strong>, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Wayland Baptist University<br><strong><em>Brad Reeder</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President for Financial Services, Berry College<br></blockquote></span><br> </div><h3>Budgeting Within Our (Limited) Means: A CAO/CFO/CEMO Collaboration</h3>The CAO/CFO/CEMO from University of St. Francis will share their institution’s journey from traditional, rigid operational planning exercises to a more transparent, robust workgroup/budget and planning committee model. Learn how a small, tuition-dependent institution improved their budgeting process to not only include more faculty and staff in the process, but ensure that the entire university budgets within its financial means each year.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Julee Gard</em></strong>, Vice President for Administration and Finance, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Beth Roth</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Eric Wignall</em></strong>, Vice President for Admissions and Enrollment Services, University of St. Francis (IL)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building a Culture of Transfer across the Institution: Lessons from Transfer Pathways Initiatives</h3>Transfer pathways are designed to provide community college transfer students with clear guidelines to achieve a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choosing. For these students to achieve their goals and thrive, they require multi-faceted support across admissions, advising, academic programs, and financial aid. In this session, two institutional teams will share their insights into building a strong culture of transfer on campus to complement the creation of new, discipline-specific transfer pathways. Both institutions are participants in Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts projects, jointly sponsored by the Teagle Foundation and the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br><strong><em>Jeff Frederick</em></strong>, Provost, Wingate University <br> <strong> <em>Melissa Perdue</em></strong>, Chief Financial Officer, Wingate University <br> <strong> <em>Marcy Ritzert</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Continuous Transformation for Sustainable Business Models </h3>Innovation is not a one-step process. An experienced college president who is now a higher education financial consultant and a currently serving chief financial officer will share how building a culture of continuous transformation can result in strong, sustainable business models. In this structured session, participants will engage in a three-part exercise that includes an evaluation of their institution’s financial sustainability; assessment of the systems and structures in place that impact its ability to embrace a transformation mindset; and examples of strategies deployed in the continuous model that includes a tactical deployment of limited resources.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Arthur Snyder</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Indiana Institute of Technology, and Consultant, NACUBO Consulting<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Cross-divisional Partnerships and Collaboration</h3>Institutions of higher education, like other organizations, have long recognized the importance of cross-divisional collaboration in achieving missions and goals. Collaboration produces a synergy that yields more, saves more, and achieves more. And yet, many campuses are full of examples of where this does not happen. In difficult economic times it becomes even more important that people work together across silos to ensure the institutions are efficiently deploying their resources. This panel will share examples of how institutions efficiently utilize cross-divisional partnerships for effective processes and solutions. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Kendrick T. Brown</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morehouse College<br><strong><em>Terry M. Keller</em></strong>, Provost, Lourdes University<br><strong><em>Undria Stalling</em></strong>, Senior Vice President of Business and Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Morehouse College<br></blockquote> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Cultivating Leadership Teams that Work Well Together</h3>This panel presents two successful models of intentionally cultivating leadership at different levels and among different groups on campus. Both have achieved remarkable success. One model describes a faculty leadership academy which has been in place for the past seven years. The presenter will share the central ingredients that have contributed to the success of the academy, and help others imagine how to develop or reshape a leadership program that best meets their institutions’ needs. The other model is a strategic enrollment council with participation from admissions, academic affairs, financial aid, student life, retention, marketing, athletics, student accounts, alumni/development, faculty, DEI, and IT participants. This model focuses on working across silos to find leaders who work well together for the benefit of the institution. Participants will leave with replicable examples of how to develop leaders who work well together.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Sarah Coen</em></strong>, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Enrollment Management, Transylvania University<br><strong><em>Wendy Hilton-Morrow</em></strong>, Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Dean of the College, Augustana College (IL)<br></blockquote> </span></span> <span> <span> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Developing Middle Talent: Connecting Key Leaders to Institutional Strategy and Vision</h3>Middle talent see and experience problems and inefficiencies at the ground level, but they aren’t usually invited to be part of the solution to those problems. While it’s critically important for cabinet leaders and the president to be aligned around institutional future, it’s the middle talent who can bring the perspective of how systems and culture impact students and faculty members on a day-to-day basis. Connecting middle talent into the mission and vision of the institution while developing their individual skills, passions, and strengths is integral to not only employee fulfillment, but also to student success, retention, and culture change. This panel discussion will explore approaches to middle talent development at both organizational and institutional levels, identify key elements of focus in that development, and offer tools for engagement.<br></span></span></span></span><br> <h3>Examples of Forward-Looking Excellence</h3>This panel will showcase a diverse sample of forward-looking initiatives on campuses to provoke creative thinking. Examples will include programs for student development and preparation for post-graduation work life, intentionally planned cross-divisional collaborations, and faculty development. How did these programs start? How do they function? Are there drawbacks to these models? How replicable are they? <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Karla McCain</em></strong>, Provost, Blackburn College<br><strong><em>Elaine Meyer-Lee</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Goucher College<br><strong><em>Wendy Sherman Heckler</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Otterbein University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Identifying and Mentoring the Next Generation of Academic Leaders </h3>As the baby boom generation retires and the great resignation from academia proceeds, the need for academic leaders is great. This session will focus on how to identify all potential academic leaders within the faculty and staff, including those that may have historically been overlooked, offer them the encouragement and experiences necessary to prepare them for the role of Chief Academic Officer, and provide new CAOs with coaching and mentoring to help them succeed. Presenters will share their own paths to academic leadership and discuss the experiences they found most useful. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan R. Burns</em></strong>, President, College of Mount Saint Vincent<br><strong><em>Graciela Caneiro-Livingston</em></strong>, Provost, Nebraska Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Christopher Spicer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morningside University<br><strong><em>Alden Stout</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Newman University (KS) <br> <strong> <em>Carol Traupman-Carr</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Inclusive Pedagogy/Inclusive Teaching</h3>As student populations become more diverse and campus leaders become more attentive to long neglected inequities, effective institutions are finding ways to make learner experience more equitable. Panelists will discuss the forms that inclusive pedagogy has taken on their campuses. What type of training do faculty receive? Are they rewarded for doing it right? What is the level of adoption on campuses? What challenges have proponents of this type of teaching faced?<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Tracy S. Parkinson</em></strong>, Executive Vice President and Provost, Mars Hill University<br><strong><em>A. Gillian Stewart-Wells</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Judson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Introducing Badges, Micro-credentials, and Certificates with Credit Bearing Programs</h3>Higher education is in crisis and with the imminent demographic cliff, institutions are looking to expand access to non-traditional, non-degree-seeking students. Additionally, institutions are focusing on creating a pathway to career-readiness for students on their campuses. Badges and micro-credentials provide an avenue for students to document the totality of their learning experience, including skills that do not fall neatly within majors. This panel will showcase examples of how campuses have integrated these special credentials into their programs. One institution has done much in this area through partnerships with high schools, community colleges, and businesses. In addition, it has added stackable credentials, digital badging, PLA, and professional development programming. Another campus is engaging in interesting experimental work in this area. Panelists will talk about their successes and challenges.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>D. Nathan Phinney</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Northwestern College (IA)<br><strong><em>Eden Wales Freedman</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Clarke University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes </h3>As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jim Hundrieser</em></strong>, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO<br><strong><em>George Stiell</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Improving Science Pedagogy on Your Campus</h3>Making science accessible to students has been a major challenge. To address this concern and enhance the effectiveness of science education, CIC held a Seminar on Science Pedagogy, funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation. In this session, participating campus team leaders will discuss the impact of the seminar on faculty members and students at their institutions and how that impact can be sustained and serve as a foundation for additional growth. Did implementing the new interactive methods or techniques in courses improve overall inclusivity and participation in class? Were faculty members more willing to discuss pedagogy challenges and innovations with colleagues? How can CAOs support and encourage faculty members who are trying new methods or techniques? <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Amanda J. Brosnahan</em></strong>, Dean, College of Health and Science and Associate Professor of Biology, Concordia University, St. Paul<br><strong><em>Eva Lovas</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Nebraska Methodist College<br><strong><em>Ian J. Rhile</em></strong>, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Albright College</blockquote> <br> <h3>Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes </h3>As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jim Hundrieser</em></strong>, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO<br><strong><em>George Stiell</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College<br></blockquote> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Shared Governance and Academic Freedom</h3>As numerous institutions move from a college to university model, and as the need to become nimbler and more responsive in management styles becomes more palpable and pressing, the more shared governance must evolve. This panel presents the example of an institution that has spent time reworking its shared governance model—moving from divisions to schools and a college—and is now working to develop faculty leaders who will operationalize the new system. The other presenter will talk about driving change within shared governance and share models for success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong><strong> <em>Colin Irvine</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Augustana University (SD)<br><strong><em>Nancy G. Schreiber</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Salve Regina University<br></blockquote> </span></span> <br> <h3>The Library as a Shared Space Focused on Student Success</h3>The library has long been considered the heart of the campus, and is now re-inventing that role to anticipate the changing needs of students. Building on traditional library strengths as a community center and collaborator, libraries are increasingly sharing spaces with academic success units, from career centers to peer tutoring services to information technology help desks. How can these departments retain their important individual identities and purposes, yet also fuse their services and energies to create an updated, dynamic approach to support student success? This session will explore potential benefits to these collaborative partnerships including as a tool for recruitment and cost-saving. Learn how to plan for a transition to a student success model in a library, and gain insight into best practices for enabling integration of academic success services among new building partners.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Karen A. Campbell</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Albright College<br><strong><em>Joan Ruelle</em></strong>, Dean of the Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University<br><strong><em>Andrew Pearson</em></strong>, Director of the Forrer Learning Commons, Bridgewater College<br>Chair: <strong><em>Luke Vilelle</em></strong>, University Librarian, Wyndham Robertson Library, Hollins University, and Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Liaison to CIC</blockquote>
Plenary Address: Mark D. GearanPlenary Address: Mark D. Gearan46Mark D. GearanPlenary Session<h3>Service and Democracy: Liberal Arts’ Unique Role in the 21st Century</h3><p>As a two-time long serving president of a liberal arts institution and former director of the Peace Corps and Harvard’s Institute of Politics, Mark Gearan will draw from his experience in government and higher education to reflect on this critical moment for our democracy and the unique role liberal arts institutions play in rebuilding a civic ethic and renewed engagement.<br></p>
Institute RegistrationInstitute Registration104
Connect with Institute SponsorsConnect with Institute Sponsors107
Poetry ReadingPoetry Reading108<p>Participants are invited to read one of their own poems. A call for readers is forthcoming.​</p>
Breakfast and Roundtable DiscussionsBreakfast and Roundtable Discussions109<p>​Breakfast is provided for all Institute participants. Tuesday’s roundtable discussions offer institutional leadership teams the opportunity to share insights from conference sessions and new ideas to address important challenges on their home campuses.</p>
Connect with Institute SponsorsConnect with Institute Sponsors17<h3><br></h3>
Networking and Refreshment Break (Break for Hotel Check-out)Networking and Refreshment Break (Break for Hotel Check-out)110
Meetings of Affinity GroupsMeetings of Affinity Groups111<strong>Christian College Consortium Chief Academic Officers and Spouses</strong> will meet Tuesday, November 8, 12:15–5:00 p.m. with dinner at 6:00 p.m. The meeting continues Wednesday, November 9, 8:00 a.m.–Noon beginning with breakfast.<br><blockquote>Coordinator: <strong><em>James H. (Jay) Barnes III</em></strong>, President, Christian College Consortium</blockquote><div class="section-parts row"><div class="col-xs-12"></div></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions5Concurrent SessionThe below listing of sessions planned to date will be held on Sunday, November 6, or Tuesday, November 8. (The sessions on Monday, November 7, are aligned with the Foundational Workshop topics). As additional speakers and sessions are confirmed and as sessions are assigned to specific time slots, this website will be updated.<br> <div> <span> <div> <br> </div> <h3>Attracting and Retaining a Student Population that Meets Academic, Enrollment, and Financial Needs</h3>Within independent higher education, institutions are unique in their missions, in who they serve, and how they program the educational experience for their students. It is essential to manage enrollment to ensure that enough tuition is generated to keep the institution in operation, particularly at institutions with smaller endowments and fewer avenues for generating revenue. This panel will discuss the importance of and examples of strategic collaboration between academic affairs, enrollment management, and business affairs working in alignment to attract and retain cohorts of students who can benefit from the academic program and generate the tuition required to run the institution.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Andrew R. Bressette</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment Management, Berry College<br><strong><em>Cindy Marlow McClenagan</em></strong>, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Wayland Baptist University<br><strong><em>Brad Reeder</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President for Financial Services, Berry College<br></blockquote></span><br> </div><h3>Budgeting Within Our (Limited) Means: A CAO/CFO/CEMO Collaboration</h3>The CAO/CFO/CEMO from University of St. Francis will share their institution’s journey from traditional, rigid operational planning exercises to a more transparent, robust workgroup/budget and planning committee model. Learn how a small, tuition-dependent institution improved their budgeting process to not only include more faculty and staff in the process, but ensure that the entire university budgets within its financial means each year.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Julee Gard</em></strong>, Vice President for Administration and Finance, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Beth Roth</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Eric Wignall</em></strong>, Vice President for Admissions and Enrollment Services, University of St. Francis (IL)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building a Culture of Transfer across the Institution: Lessons from Transfer Pathways Initiatives</h3>Transfer pathways are designed to provide community college transfer students with clear guidelines to achieve a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choosing. For these students to achieve their goals and thrive, they require multi-faceted support across admissions, advising, academic programs, and financial aid. In this session, two institutional teams will share their insights into building a strong culture of transfer on campus to complement the creation of new, discipline-specific transfer pathways. Both institutions are participants in Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts projects, jointly sponsored by the Teagle Foundation and the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br><strong><em>Jeff Frederick</em></strong>, Provost, Wingate University <br> <strong> <em>Melissa Perdue</em></strong>, Chief Financial Officer, Wingate University <br> <strong> <em>Marcy Ritzert</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Continuous Transformation for Sustainable Business Models </h3>Innovation is not a one-step process. An experienced college president who is now a higher education financial consultant and a currently serving chief financial officer will share how building a culture of continuous transformation can result in strong, sustainable business models. In this structured session, participants will engage in a three-part exercise that includes an evaluation of their institution’s financial sustainability; assessment of the systems and structures in place that impact its ability to embrace a transformation mindset; and examples of strategies deployed in the continuous model that includes a tactical deployment of limited resources.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Arthur Snyder</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Indiana Institute of Technology, and Consultant, NACUBO Consulting<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Cross-divisional Partnerships and Collaboration</h3>Institutions of higher education, like other organizations, have long recognized the importance of cross-divisional collaboration in achieving missions and goals. Collaboration produces a synergy that yields more, saves more, and achieves more. And yet, many campuses are full of examples of where this does not happen. In difficult economic times it becomes even more important that people work together across silos to ensure the institutions are efficiently deploying their resources. This panel will share examples of how institutions efficiently utilize cross-divisional partnerships for effective processes and solutions. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Kendrick T. Brown</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morehouse College<br><strong><em>Terry M. Keller</em></strong>, Provost, Lourdes University<br><strong><em>Undria Stalling</em></strong>, Senior Vice President of Business and Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Morehouse College<br></blockquote> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Cultivating Leadership Teams that Work Well Together</h3>This panel presents two successful models of intentionally cultivating leadership at different levels and among different groups on campus. Both have achieved remarkable success. One model describes a faculty leadership academy which has been in place for the past seven years. The presenter will share the central ingredients that have contributed to the success of the academy, and help others imagine how to develop or reshape a leadership program that best meets their institutions’ needs. The other model is a strategic enrollment council with participation from admissions, academic affairs, financial aid, student life, retention, marketing, athletics, student accounts, alumni/development, faculty, DEI, and IT participants. This model focuses on working across silos to find leaders who work well together for the benefit of the institution. Participants will leave with replicable examples of how to develop leaders who work well together.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Sarah Coen</em></strong>, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Enrollment Management, Transylvania University<br><strong><em>Wendy Hilton-Morrow</em></strong>, Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Dean of the College, Augustana College (IL)<br></blockquote> </span></span> <span> <span> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Developing Middle Talent: Connecting Key Leaders to Institutional Strategy and Vision</h3>Middle talent see and experience problems and inefficiencies at the ground level, but they aren’t usually invited to be part of the solution to those problems. While it’s critically important for cabinet leaders and the president to be aligned around institutional future, it’s the middle talent who can bring the perspective of how systems and culture impact students and faculty members on a day-to-day basis. Connecting middle talent into the mission and vision of the institution while developing their individual skills, passions, and strengths is integral to not only employee fulfillment, but also to student success, retention, and culture change. This panel discussion will explore approaches to middle talent development at both organizational and institutional levels, identify key elements of focus in that development, and offer tools for engagement.<br></span></span></span></span><br> <h3>Examples of Forward-Looking Excellence</h3>This panel will showcase a diverse sample of forward-looking initiatives on campuses to provoke creative thinking. Examples will include programs for student development and preparation for post-graduation work life, intentionally planned cross-divisional collaborations, and faculty development. How did these programs start? How do they function? Are there drawbacks to these models? How replicable are they? <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Karla McCain</em></strong>, Provost, Blackburn College<br><strong><em>Elaine Meyer-Lee</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Goucher College<br><strong><em>Wendy Sherman Heckler</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Otterbein University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Identifying and Mentoring the Next Generation of Academic Leaders </h3>As the baby boom generation retires and the great resignation from academia proceeds, the need for academic leaders is great. This session will focus on how to identify all potential academic leaders within the faculty and staff, including those that may have historically been overlooked, offer them the encouragement and experiences necessary to prepare them for the role of Chief Academic Officer, and provide new CAOs with coaching and mentoring to help them succeed. Presenters will share their own paths to academic leadership and discuss the experiences they found most useful. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan R. Burns</em></strong>, President, College of Mount Saint Vincent<br><strong><em>Graciela Caneiro-Livingston</em></strong>, Provost, Nebraska Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Christopher Spicer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morningside University<br><strong><em>Alden Stout</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Newman University (KS) <br> <strong> <em>Carol Traupman-Carr</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Inclusive Pedagogy/Inclusive Teaching</h3>As student populations become more diverse and campus leaders become more attentive to long neglected inequities, effective institutions are finding ways to make learner experience more equitable. Panelists will discuss the forms that inclusive pedagogy has taken on their campuses. What type of training do faculty receive? Are they rewarded for doing it right? What is the level of adoption on campuses? What challenges have proponents of this type of teaching faced?<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Tracy S. Parkinson</em></strong>, Executive Vice President and Provost, Mars Hill University<br><strong><em>A. Gillian Stewart-Wells</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Judson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Introducing Badges, Micro-credentials, and Certificates with Credit Bearing Programs</h3>Higher education is in crisis and with the imminent demographic cliff, institutions are looking to expand access to non-traditional, non-degree-seeking students. Additionally, institutions are focusing on creating a pathway to career-readiness for students on their campuses. Badges and micro-credentials provide an avenue for students to document the totality of their learning experience, including skills that do not fall neatly within majors. This panel will showcase examples of how campuses have integrated these special credentials into their programs. One institution has done much in this area through partnerships with high schools, community colleges, and businesses. In addition, it has added stackable credentials, digital badging, PLA, and professional development programming. Another campus is engaging in interesting experimental work in this area. Panelists will talk about their successes and challenges.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>D. Nathan Phinney</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Northwestern College (IA)<br><strong><em>Eden Wales Freedman</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Clarke University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes </h3>As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jim Hundrieser</em></strong>, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO<br><strong><em>George Stiell</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Improving Science Pedagogy on Your Campus</h3>Making science accessible to students has been a major challenge. To address this concern and enhance the effectiveness of science education, CIC held a Seminar on Science Pedagogy, funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation. In this session, participating campus team leaders will discuss the impact of the seminar on faculty members and students at their institutions and how that impact can be sustained and serve as a foundation for additional growth. Did implementing the new interactive methods or techniques in courses improve overall inclusivity and participation in class? Were faculty members more willing to discuss pedagogy challenges and innovations with colleagues? How can CAOs support and encourage faculty members who are trying new methods or techniques? <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Amanda J. Brosnahan</em></strong>, Dean, College of Health and Science and Associate Professor of Biology, Concordia University, St. Paul<br><strong><em>Eva Lovas</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Nebraska Methodist College<br><strong><em>Ian J. Rhile</em></strong>, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Albright College</blockquote> <br> <h3>Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes </h3>As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jim Hundrieser</em></strong>, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO<br><strong><em>George Stiell</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College<br></blockquote> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Shared Governance and Academic Freedom</h3>As numerous institutions move from a college to university model, and as the need to become nimbler and more responsive in management styles becomes more palpable and pressing, the more shared governance must evolve. This panel presents the example of an institution that has spent time reworking its shared governance model—moving from divisions to schools and a college—and is now working to develop faculty leaders who will operationalize the new system. The other presenter will talk about driving change within shared governance and share models for success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong><strong> <em>Colin Irvine</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Augustana University (SD)<br><strong><em>Nancy G. Schreiber</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Salve Regina University<br></blockquote> </span></span> <br> <h3>The Library as a Shared Space Focused on Student Success</h3>The library has long been considered the heart of the campus, and is now re-inventing that role to anticipate the changing needs of students. Building on traditional library strengths as a community center and collaborator, libraries are increasingly sharing spaces with academic success units, from career centers to peer tutoring services to information technology help desks. How can these departments retain their important individual identities and purposes, yet also fuse their services and energies to create an updated, dynamic approach to support student success? This session will explore potential benefits to these collaborative partnerships including as a tool for recruitment and cost-saving. Learn how to plan for a transition to a student success model in a library, and gain insight into best practices for enabling integration of academic success services among new building partners.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Karen A. Campbell</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Albright College<br><strong><em>Joan Ruelle</em></strong>, Dean of the Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University<br><strong><em>Andrew Pearson</em></strong>, Director of the Forrer Learning Commons, Bridgewater College<br>Chair: <strong><em>Luke Vilelle</em></strong>, University Librarian, Wyndham Robertson Library, Hollins University, and Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Liaison to CIC</blockquote>
Networking Break with SponsorsNetworking Break with Sponsors6
Foundational WorkshopsFoundational Workshops11WorkshopThese workshops will equip participants with the language and skills they need to respond to specific pressing issues on their campuses. The workshops are foundational in that they will outline best practices in nuanced language and take participants through the specific steps necessary to lead their campuses to implement well-conceived plans that respond to a specific challenge. Each workshop will be followed by concurrent sessions that delve more deeply into the topic. Participants are free to move between themes, stay with the same theme, or just choose any session of interest at any given time.<br><br><em>These workshops are free of charge and do not require pre-registration, but they have limited capacity. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Workshops will be repeated at 10:45 a.m.</em><br><br> <h3>Academic Programming for Financial Sustainability</h3>Academic program decisions are critical to future students, faculty, mission, and financials. How can campus leaders make sure they get them right? This session will describe best practices for evaluating markets for academic programs and will cover metrics on student demand, employment, and competition. It will describe how to estimate the effects of program decisions on an institution’s bottom line and will explore how to invest in programs that will increase enrollment and margins. The workshop also will address the impact of program choices on diversity, equity, and inclusion and share a model for estimating the cost of implementing an equitable student success initiative. Finally, participants will explore a simulator that demonstrates the impact of program decisions on budgeting and student success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Robert Atkins</em></strong>, CEO and Founder, Gray Associates<br><br>Robert Atkins leads Gray Associates and the development of Gray’s education industry software and services. He works with education clients, consulting with presidents, CAOs, CFOs, and CEMOs on program assessment, institutional strategy, pricing, and location selection. Since founding Gray Associates, Atkins has worked with institutions across all sectors of higher education, including the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, to develop institutional and programmatic growth strategies, identify new markets, and model program and course economics. He led the design of PES+ Markets, PES+ Economics, and Gray Associates Program Strategy Workshops. His new book, <cite>Start, Stop, or Grow? A Data-Informed Approach to Academic Program Evaluation and Management</cite>, was published in spring 2022.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion</h3>The curricular modules presented in this workshop will provide participants with practical tools with which to evaluate institutional structures and create transformational change. Participants will explore a variety of equity-focused tools and concepts, including cultural humility and appreciative inquiry, and use them to assess institutional structure and culture. Specific modules will help participants to create strategies that centralize diversity, equity, and inclusion in institutional processes and structures. Other modules will address overcoming backlash and other forms of resistance to change. Upon completion of the modules, participants will have developed an individualized plan to address campuswide equity and inclusion needs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Rodmon King</em></strong>, Dean of Institutional Equity and Inclusion, Connecticut College<br><br>For almost 20 years, Rodmon King has facilitated workshops and professional development sessions on cultural humility, organizational assessment, full participation, structural inequality, microaggressions and implicit bias, unearned privilege, nonviolent communication, transformational change, and appreciative inquiry. Currently the dean of institutional equity and inclusion at Connecticut College, King previously served as the interim director of the Institute for Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Transformative Practice at SUNY Oswego. He has also served on the Greater Kentucky Higher Education Recruitment Consortium advisory board as well as the steering committee for the Consortium for Faculty Diversity. King earned his MA and PhD in philosophy from the University of Rochester.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Collegiate Mental Health in the Past Decade: Recent Trends, the Impact of COVID-19, and Next Steps</h3>This workshop will review a brief history of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) and present the latest findings on trends in student mental health and the impact of COVID-19. The workshop will then examine widely documented increases in mental health problems and demand for counseling services over the past two decades. Finally, the presenter will explore implications pertaining to mental health resource allocation, multi-layered support options, and future directions for research. The CCMH at Penn State University is an international practice-research network of more than 700 colleges and universities whose mission is to bridge the gap between science and practice in college counseling centers. CCMH collects and analyzes de-identified data as part of the routine practice when students seek mental health treatment at colleges and universities. The information is used, in turn, to benefit college counseling centers, administrators, researchers, the public, and most importantly the students receiving services.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Brett E. Scofield</em></strong>, Executive Director, The Center for Collegiate Mental Health, Pennsylvania State University<br><br>Brett E. Scofield has devoted nearly his entire career to collegiate mental health, working as a clinician and administrator within numerous university-based counseling centers over the past 18 years. He currently serves as associate director of the Penn State Center for Counseling and Psychological Services as well as executive director of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH). Scofield has played a significant role within CCMH for the past eight years, contributing to several publications on the topic of college student mental health and helping the center develop numerous tools that are widely used by college counseling centers nationally to advocate for services. In addition, threat assessment and management are a particular interest of Scofield’s, having served on the Threat Assessment Teams at two major universities since 2012. Scofield earned a PhD in clinical-community psychology from Wichita State University.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Tenacious Independent Education</h3>While the private, nonprofit higher education sector may identify as being independent of government, it is in fact more dependent on federal support for campuses and students than perhaps ever before. At the same time, campus communities are deeply affected by the seismic political shifts happening in our nation. How can campus leaders successfully navigate this intersection and ensure that their campus recognizes today’s political landscape while maintaining effective relationships with elected officials, students, faculty members, and staffs?<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Barbara K. Mistick</em></strong>, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)<br><br>Barbara K. Mistick became president of NAICU in 2019. During the past two years, Mistick led independent higher education through the COVID-19 pandemic, collaborating with all sectors of the higher education eco-system to secure over $77 billion in relief funds from Congress. Working together with NAICU members across the United States throughout this crisis, she ensured fair and equitable treatment for the nation’s 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities and the more than 5 million students they serve. Mistick also enhanced NAICU’s communication efforts and virtual tools to keep members informed of federal efforts and opportunities for assistance. These efforts were critical to ensuring the health and safety of our nation’s campuses and the communities they serve. Over the course of her 30-year career in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, Mistick has been an entrepreneur, educator, and leader at institutions such as Wilson College (PA), the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, the H.J. Heinz School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University, the National Education Center for Women in Business at Seton Hill University, and at various businesses she managed or founded.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Using Data for Institutional Effectiveness</h3>This workshop will focus on the foundations of institutional effectiveness and how campus leaders can pause, reflect, evaluate, and innovate as institutional effectiveness practices are adapted to challenges higher education is facing now and into the future. Student success, retention, equity, and quality are at the forefront of conversations on many campuses and in higher education itself. Ways to engage campus-wide participation focused on these issues will continue to be part of larger strategic conversations as higher ed moves beyond this moment and onto other challenges that await.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Bethany Miller</em></strong>, Director of Institutional Research and Assessment, Macalester College<br><br>Bethany Miller is director of institutional research and assessment at Macalester College in Minnesota. With a focus on equity and inclusion as well as assessment, she has published, presented, and consulted, building on her work experiences at Cornell College and Mary Baldwin University. Supported by a PhD in education with an emphasis on research, evaluation, statistics, and assessment, her work lays a foundation for collaboration to build shared understanding and use of data to strengthen student and institutional success. Miller is co-authoring a book on equity-centered collaboration in the use of data to inform student and institutional success. She currently chairs the Higher Education Data Sharing Consortium (HEDS) board; she is concluding her service as steering committee chair for the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) of the Upper Midwest and as a member of AIR’s Nominations and Elections Committee.</blockquote>
Networking and Refreshment BreakNetworking and Refreshment Break15<em></em><br>
Closing Plenary PanelClosing Plenary Panel22Robert S. Blue; Glenn Getchell; Anita Jones ThomasPlenary Session<em></em>Tenacious. Confident. Forward looking. This closing plenary panel will wrap up the Institute with a forward-looking vision of better collaboration between different areas on campus. Panelists will explore key lessons they learned from each other, about each other’s work, and ways in which they can support each other to be more successful. They will share how they plan to collaborate for improved results and move forward tenaciously and confidently.<br>
Luncheon for CIC Chief Academic Affairs, Finance, and Enrollment Officers Task ForceLuncheon for CIC Chief Academic Affairs, Finance, and Enrollment Officers Task Force60<p>​<em>(By invitation only)</em><br></p>
Reception for Administrators of ColorReception for Administrators of Color73<p></p>All college and university administrators who identify as people of color are invited to attend this networking reception. <br><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Titi Ufomata</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Programs, CIC<br></blockquote>
Welcome and Keynote Address: Mary B. MarcyWelcome and Keynote Address: Mary B. Marcy2Mary B. MarcyPlenary Session<h3>Campuses at the Inflection Point: Strategic Innovation for Sustainability and Equity</h3><p>Independent higher education currently faces profound challenges: the disruption of the pandemic, an impending demographic cliff, problems with the business model, and overdue racial reckoning. Yet the value of independent higher education, including our ability to engage students across differences, build strong communities, and ask fundamental questions, has never been more apparent. How can we position our campuses to meet the moment? This talk will present a strategic framework, raise essential questions, and offer examples from institutions that are successfully adapting to the shifting higher education ecosystem.<br></p>
All-Institute ReceptionAll-Institute Reception115<em></em>Following an afternoon of sessions, it will be time to reconnect and enjoy each other’s company. All Institute participants are invited to gather for drinks, refreshments, and conversation.
Wellness ActivitiesWellness Activities10<em>These activities are free of charge and do not require pre-registration, but they have limited capacity. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis.</em><br><br><h3>Meditation for Mindfulness</h3>The practice of meditation has been documented to reduce stress and anxiety, assist in sleep disorders, enhance creative thinking, strengthen the immune system, boost performance, improve relationships and much more. This introduction to meditation session will guide participants through various breathing techniques to help their physical body operate in its optimal state. Participants will be guided through several mini meditations that will help them become more present and centered, help to reduce stress, ease anxiety, and calm the “noise”. This session is for all levels of experience, and any attire is welcome. You will be seated for the entire session and all materials will be provided. <br><blockquote>Instructor: <strong><em>Leah Frazier</em></strong>, Esq, CMT<br></blockquote><br><h3>Yoga for Wellness</h3>Reset, rejuvenate, and revitalize body and mind with this beginner-friendly yoga class. Awaken your entire being with simple movements, coordinated breathing, and concentration on the present. This session will include a short talk, followed by standing and seated postures with the optional use of chairs. A yoga mat is not required for this class. For best results, please arrive in comfortable work-out attire and with an empty stomach.<br><blockquote>Instructor: <strong><em>Ricky Tran</em></strong>, BBA, CBA, Qualified Level 4</blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions18Concurrent SessionThe below listing of sessions planned to date will be held on Sunday, November 6, or Tuesday, November 8. (The sessions on Monday, November 7, are aligned with the Foundational Workshop topics). As additional speakers and sessions are confirmed and as sessions are assigned to specific time slots, this website will be updated.<br> <div> <span> <div> <br> </div> <h3>Attracting and Retaining a Student Population that Meets Academic, Enrollment, and Financial Needs</h3>Within independent higher education, institutions are unique in their missions, in who they serve, and how they program the educational experience for their students. It is essential to manage enrollment to ensure that enough tuition is generated to keep the institution in operation, particularly at institutions with smaller endowments and fewer avenues for generating revenue. This panel will discuss the importance of and examples of strategic collaboration between academic affairs, enrollment management, and business affairs working in alignment to attract and retain cohorts of students who can benefit from the academic program and generate the tuition required to run the institution.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Andrew R. Bressette</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment Management, Berry College<br><strong><em>Cindy Marlow McClenagan</em></strong>, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Wayland Baptist University<br><strong><em>Brad Reeder</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President for Financial Services, Berry College<br></blockquote></span><br> </div><h3>Budgeting Within Our (Limited) Means: A CAO/CFO/CEMO Collaboration</h3>The CAO/CFO/CEMO from University of St. Francis will share their institution’s journey from traditional, rigid operational planning exercises to a more transparent, robust workgroup/budget and planning committee model. Learn how a small, tuition-dependent institution improved their budgeting process to not only include more faculty and staff in the process, but ensure that the entire university budgets within its financial means each year.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Julee Gard</em></strong>, Vice President for Administration and Finance, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Beth Roth</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Eric Wignall</em></strong>, Vice President for Admissions and Enrollment Services, University of St. Francis (IL)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building a Culture of Transfer across the Institution: Lessons from Transfer Pathways Initiatives</h3>Transfer pathways are designed to provide community college transfer students with clear guidelines to achieve a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choosing. For these students to achieve their goals and thrive, they require multi-faceted support across admissions, advising, academic programs, and financial aid. In this session, two institutional teams will share their insights into building a strong culture of transfer on campus to complement the creation of new, discipline-specific transfer pathways. Both institutions are participants in Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts projects, jointly sponsored by the Teagle Foundation and the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br><strong><em>Jeff Frederick</em></strong>, Provost, Wingate University <br> <strong> <em>Melissa Perdue</em></strong>, Chief Financial Officer, Wingate University <br> <strong> <em>Marcy Ritzert</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Continuous Transformation for Sustainable Business Models </h3>Innovation is not a one-step process. An experienced college president who is now a higher education financial consultant and a currently serving chief financial officer will share how building a culture of continuous transformation can result in strong, sustainable business models. In this structured session, participants will engage in a three-part exercise that includes an evaluation of their institution’s financial sustainability; assessment of the systems and structures in place that impact its ability to embrace a transformation mindset; and examples of strategies deployed in the continuous model that includes a tactical deployment of limited resources.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Arthur Snyder</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Indiana Institute of Technology, and Consultant, NACUBO Consulting<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Cross-divisional Partnerships and Collaboration</h3>Institutions of higher education, like other organizations, have long recognized the importance of cross-divisional collaboration in achieving missions and goals. Collaboration produces a synergy that yields more, saves more, and achieves more. And yet, many campuses are full of examples of where this does not happen. In difficult economic times it becomes even more important that people work together across silos to ensure the institutions are efficiently deploying their resources. This panel will share examples of how institutions efficiently utilize cross-divisional partnerships for effective processes and solutions. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Kendrick T. Brown</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morehouse College<br><strong><em>Terry M. Keller</em></strong>, Provost, Lourdes University<br><strong><em>Undria Stalling</em></strong>, Senior Vice President of Business and Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Morehouse College<br></blockquote> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Cultivating Leadership Teams that Work Well Together</h3>This panel presents two successful models of intentionally cultivating leadership at different levels and among different groups on campus. Both have achieved remarkable success. One model describes a faculty leadership academy which has been in place for the past seven years. The presenter will share the central ingredients that have contributed to the success of the academy, and help others imagine how to develop or reshape a leadership program that best meets their institutions’ needs. The other model is a strategic enrollment council with participation from admissions, academic affairs, financial aid, student life, retention, marketing, athletics, student accounts, alumni/development, faculty, DEI, and IT participants. This model focuses on working across silos to find leaders who work well together for the benefit of the institution. Participants will leave with replicable examples of how to develop leaders who work well together.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Sarah Coen</em></strong>, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Enrollment Management, Transylvania University<br><strong><em>Wendy Hilton-Morrow</em></strong>, Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Dean of the College, Augustana College (IL)<br></blockquote> </span></span> <span> <span> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Developing Middle Talent: Connecting Key Leaders to Institutional Strategy and Vision</h3>Middle talent see and experience problems and inefficiencies at the ground level, but they aren’t usually invited to be part of the solution to those problems. While it’s critically important for cabinet leaders and the president to be aligned around institutional future, it’s the middle talent who can bring the perspective of how systems and culture impact students and faculty members on a day-to-day basis. Connecting middle talent into the mission and vision of the institution while developing their individual skills, passions, and strengths is integral to not only employee fulfillment, but also to student success, retention, and culture change. This panel discussion will explore approaches to middle talent development at both organizational and institutional levels, identify key elements of focus in that development, and offer tools for engagement.<br></span></span></span></span><br> <h3>Examples of Forward-Looking Excellence</h3>This panel will showcase a diverse sample of forward-looking initiatives on campuses to provoke creative thinking. Examples will include programs for student development and preparation for post-graduation work life, intentionally planned cross-divisional collaborations, and faculty development. How did these programs start? How do they function? Are there drawbacks to these models? How replicable are they? <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Karla McCain</em></strong>, Provost, Blackburn College<br><strong><em>Elaine Meyer-Lee</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Goucher College<br><strong><em>Wendy Sherman Heckler</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Otterbein University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Identifying and Mentoring the Next Generation of Academic Leaders </h3>As the baby boom generation retires and the great resignation from academia proceeds, the need for academic leaders is great. This session will focus on how to identify all potential academic leaders within the faculty and staff, including those that may have historically been overlooked, offer them the encouragement and experiences necessary to prepare them for the role of Chief Academic Officer, and provide new CAOs with coaching and mentoring to help them succeed. Presenters will share their own paths to academic leadership and discuss the experiences they found most useful. <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan R. Burns</em></strong>, President, College of Mount Saint Vincent<br><strong><em>Graciela Caneiro-Livingston</em></strong>, Provost, Nebraska Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Christopher Spicer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morningside University<br><strong><em>Alden Stout</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Newman University (KS) <br> <strong> <em>Carol Traupman-Carr</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Inclusive Pedagogy/Inclusive Teaching</h3>As student populations become more diverse and campus leaders become more attentive to long neglected inequities, effective institutions are finding ways to make learner experience more equitable. Panelists will discuss the forms that inclusive pedagogy has taken on their campuses. What type of training do faculty receive? Are they rewarded for doing it right? What is the level of adoption on campuses? What challenges have proponents of this type of teaching faced?<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Tracy S. Parkinson</em></strong>, Executive Vice President and Provost, Mars Hill University<br><strong><em>A. Gillian Stewart-Wells</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Judson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Introducing Badges, Micro-credentials, and Certificates with Credit Bearing Programs</h3>Higher education is in crisis and with the imminent demographic cliff, institutions are looking to expand access to non-traditional, non-degree-seeking students. Additionally, institutions are focusing on creating a pathway to career-readiness for students on their campuses. Badges and micro-credentials provide an avenue for students to document the totality of their learning experience, including skills that do not fall neatly within majors. This panel will showcase examples of how campuses have integrated these special credentials into their programs. One institution has done much in this area through partnerships with high schools, community colleges, and businesses. In addition, it has added stackable credentials, digital badging, PLA, and professional development programming. Another campus is engaging in interesting experimental work in this area. Panelists will talk about their successes and challenges.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>D. Nathan Phinney</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Northwestern College (IA)<br><strong><em>Eden Wales Freedman</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Clarke University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes </h3>As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jim Hundrieser</em></strong>, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO<br><strong><em>George Stiell</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Improving Science Pedagogy on Your Campus</h3>Making science accessible to students has been a major challenge. To address this concern and enhance the effectiveness of science education, CIC held a Seminar on Science Pedagogy, funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation. In this session, participating campus team leaders will discuss the impact of the seminar on faculty members and students at their institutions and how that impact can be sustained and serve as a foundation for additional growth. Did implementing the new interactive methods or techniques in courses improve overall inclusivity and participation in class? Were faculty members more willing to discuss pedagogy challenges and innovations with colleagues? How can CAOs support and encourage faculty members who are trying new methods or techniques? <br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Amanda J. Brosnahan</em></strong>, Dean, College of Health and Science and Associate Professor of Biology, Concordia University, St. Paul<br><strong><em>Eva Lovas</em></strong>, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Nebraska Methodist College<br><strong><em>Ian J. Rhile</em></strong>, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Albright College</blockquote> <br> <h3>Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes </h3>As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jim Hundrieser</em></strong>, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO<br><strong><em>George Stiell</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College<br></blockquote> <span> <span> <br> <h3>Shared Governance and Academic Freedom</h3>As numerous institutions move from a college to university model, and as the need to become nimbler and more responsive in management styles becomes more palpable and pressing, the more shared governance must evolve. This panel presents the example of an institution that has spent time reworking its shared governance model—moving from divisions to schools and a college—and is now working to develop faculty leaders who will operationalize the new system. The other presenter will talk about driving change within shared governance and share models for success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong><strong> <em>Colin Irvine</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Augustana University (SD)<br><strong><em>Nancy G. Schreiber</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Salve Regina University<br></blockquote> </span></span> <br> <h3>The Library as a Shared Space Focused on Student Success</h3>The library has long been considered the heart of the campus, and is now re-inventing that role to anticipate the changing needs of students. Building on traditional library strengths as a community center and collaborator, libraries are increasingly sharing spaces with academic success units, from career centers to peer tutoring services to information technology help desks. How can these departments retain their important individual identities and purposes, yet also fuse their services and energies to create an updated, dynamic approach to support student success? This session will explore potential benefits to these collaborative partnerships including as a tool for recruitment and cost-saving. Learn how to plan for a transition to a student success model in a library, and gain insight into best practices for enabling integration of academic success services among new building partners.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Karen A. Campbell</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Albright College<br><strong><em>Joan Ruelle</em></strong>, Dean of the Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University<br><strong><em>Andrew Pearson</em></strong>, Director of the Forrer Learning Commons, Bridgewater College<br>Chair: <strong><em>Luke Vilelle</em></strong>, University Librarian, Wyndham Robertson Library, Hollins University, and Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Liaison to CIC</blockquote>
Jewish Havdalah PrayersJewish Havdalah Prayers112<p>​Convener: <strong><em>Marjorie Hass</em></strong>, President, CIC</p>
Concurrent Sessions Tracked to Foundational WorkshopsConcurrent Sessions Tracked to Foundational Workshops87Concurrent SessionThe following sessions are tracked to the foundational workshops offered on Monday, November 7. All sessions are open attendance: participants do not need to have attended the workshop to participate in these sessions.<br><br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Academic Programming for Financial Sustainability</strong> workshop:<br><blockquote><h3>Case Studies for Undergraduate Academic Programming for Financial Sustainability</h3>Academic programming for financial sustainability often involves self-reflection on the part of institutions on their mission, their value, and to determine what is important, what must be maintained, and what needs to be revised or removed. In other words, it often involves prioritization at some level. The institutions represented on this panel have gone through this process; some are in the recovery stage, while others are evaluating the impact of their process. The panel presents an opportunity to see models of how academic programming can be successfully implemented through collaboration between various relevant campus constituencies.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Mark Brodl</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Illinois Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>Richard Ice</em></strong>, Provost, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University<br>Chair: <strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br></blockquote><br><h3>Strategic Program Expansion: Adding Graduate Programs and Professional Programs</h3>Enrollment pressures and difficult budgetary situations have led many colleges and universities to try creative ways to generate revenue. This session will feature case reports from institutions that undertook strategic program expansion to diversify and expand their revenue base. They will discuss how successful the expansions have been and the ways in which these programs have or have not altered their institutions, particularly liberal arts-oriented institutions.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Audra Hoffman Kahr</em></strong>, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer, Cedar Crest College<br><strong><em>Cathy Swick</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Trine University<br><strong><em>Mark D. Ward</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, University of Dubuque<br><strong><em>Robert A. Wilson</em></strong>, Provost, Cedar Crest College<br></blockquote></blockquote><br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Collegiate Mental Health in the Past Decade: Recent Trends, the Impact of COVID-19, and Next Steps</strong> workshop:<br><blockquote><h3>Case Studies in Effective Campus Wellness Initiatives</h3>This session will provide several examples of effective campus wellness initiatives.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Marianne Ward-Peradoza</em></strong>, Provost, St. Edward’s University (TX) <br></blockquote> <br><h3>Mental Health and Wellness for the Campus Community: Strategic Thought and Action</h3>This discussion session will be led by President Ladany of Oglethorpe University. Professionally a leader in this area, his campus is making health and well-being the centerpiece of their strategic plan and campaign.  He will provide important background information on how and why Oglethorpe decided to focus so sharply on mental health in their community. There will be plenty of time for discussion.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Nicholas Ladany</em></strong>, President, Oglethorpe University<br></blockquote></blockquote> <br>Follow- up sessions for the <strong>Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion</strong> workshop:<br><blockquote><h3>Creating an Inclusive Campus—Case Reports</h3>This session will present examples of successful programs that have built a genuine culture of belonging for all students. Panelists will explore the distinctive elements that made their initiatives successful and the metrics they use to assess that, as well as the path they took to build campus-wide acceptance.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Angela Haddad</em></strong>, Provost, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Lisa Perfetti</em></strong>, Provost, The College of Wooster<br><strong><em>Heather Moore Roberson</em></strong>, Director of Faculty Diversity and Inclusion and Associate Professor of Community & Justice Studies and Black Studies, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Ann M. Vendrely</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, Goshen College<br></blockquote><br><h3>Effective Practices in Supporting Diverse Student Populations</h3>This panel showcases exemplary programs and practices that support minority students on different campuses. The examples showcased on this panel have been selected because of their impact on minority students on their campuses. Participants at this session will leave with examples of what is possible and how they can implement similar programs on their campuses.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Laura Lowe Furge</em></strong>, Provost, Muhlenberg College<br></blockquote></blockquote> <br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Tenacious Independent Education</strong> workshop:<br><blockquote><h3>Navigating A Challenging Landscape: Endowments and Financial Sustainability in Higher-Ed</h3>Through the lens of a case study with Emory & Henry College President John Wells, panelists will touch on specific decision points faced by Emory & Henry and explore how endowment considerations can inform discussions around enrollment, diversity, geographic competitiveness, and navigation of the looming demographic cliff. This session will examine the vital role an endowment plays in balancing the very real enterprise needs of today against the uncertain needs of tomorrow. At the end of this panel, participants will be equipped with critical questions which will support important cross-functional discussions related to the role the endowment ideally plays across an institution.<br><blockquote><strong><em>David Brief</em></strong>, CFA, Senior Managing Director & Partner, Angeles Investments<br><strong><em>Garry Duncan</em></strong>, CAIA, Managing Director, Angeles Investments<br><strong><em>Sapna Shah</em></strong>, CFA & CAIA, Managing Director, Angeles Investments <br><strong><em>John W. Wells</em></strong>, President, Emory & Henry College<br></blockquote> <br><h3>Supporting Student Career Readiness Through High Impact Practices</h3>Institutions that focus on liberal arts programming often engage in high impact and hands-on experiences that put their students at an advantage for work post-graduation, and prepares them well for entering graduate programs. Some of these practices include undergraduate research, integrative learning, programs that connect directly to career preparation, and importantly, effective advising, which ensures that students are taking the right classes to prepare them for their chosen careers. This panel will showcase how two institutions have successfully navigated these processes.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Eric Boynton</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Beloit College<br><strong><em>Leslie Davidson</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment, Beloit College<br><strong><em>Susan Larson</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Concordia College (MN)<br></blockquote></blockquote><br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Using Data for Institutional Effectiveness</strong> workshop:<br><blockquote><h3>How Institutions Use Data to Drive Enrollment, Innovation, and Financial Sustainability</h3>Data and its analysis provide campus leaders with a common language to collaborate, promote innovation across campus, and take actions to futureproof their institutions. Leaders often need to answer questions like, “How do I increase enrollment of the best-fit students?” “Will a specific new academic program be viable and align with our institutional vision?” or “What does the financial health of our institution look like? Those types of data-informed discussions can strengthen cross-campus collaboration, leading to better outcomes for both students and the institution. During this session, a few CIC member institutions will share best practices and some examples of how data has been a conduit for collaboration and innovation.<br> <br><h3>Making the Case with Data</h3>The 2022 CIC Member Engagement Survey revealed that presidents and provosts were very interested in having access to and using data to make strategic decisions. Over a third of the indicators in the CIC Key Indicators Tool (KIT) relate to faculty and instructional resources. Understanding these key indicators and their relationships to each other can help CAOs and CFOs maximize the benefit of current expenditures on instruction and provide guidance as to whether the current level of support is adequate to achieve institutional mission. This session will have three parts: an explanation of the relevant key indicators; the use of a case study to show how the indicators can be used to frame discussions of instructional support; and a discussion of the situation on your own campus. Parts two and three will involve small group discussions in a workshop format. Questions and discussion are welcome about how institutions can use this and other data to make the case for institutional needs, priorities, and mission.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Jason Rivera</em></strong>, Director of Strategic Research, CIC<br><strong><em>Michael Williams</em></strong>, Senior Advisor for Institutional Effectiveness and Research, CIC</blockquote></blockquote>
Concurrent Sessions Tracked to Foundational WorkshopsConcurrent Sessions Tracked to Foundational Workshops113Concurrent SessionThe following sessions are tracked to the foundational workshops offered on Monday, November 7. All sessions are open attendance: participants do not need to have attended the workshop to participate in these sessions.<br><br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Academic Programming for Financial Sustainability</strong> workshop:<br> <blockquote><h3>Case Studies for Undergraduate Academic Programming for Financial Sustainability</h3>Academic programming for financial sustainability often involves self-reflection on the part of institutions on their mission, their value, and to determine what is important, what must be maintained, and what needs to be revised or removed. In other words, it often involves prioritization at some level. The institutions represented on this panel have gone through this process; some are in the recovery stage, while others are evaluating the impact of their process. The panel presents an opportunity to see models of how academic programming can be successfully implemented through collaboration between various relevant campus constituencies.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Mark Brodl</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Illinois Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>Richard Ice</em></strong>, Provost, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University<br>Chair: <strong> <em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategic Program Expansion: Adding Graduate Programs and Professional Programs</h3>Enrollment pressures and difficult budgetary situations have led many colleges and universities to try creative ways to generate revenue. This session will feature case reports from institutions that undertook strategic program expansion to diversify and expand their revenue base. They will discuss how successful the expansions have been and the ways in which these programs have or have not altered their institutions, particularly liberal arts-oriented institutions.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Audra Hoffman Kahr</em></strong>, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer, Cedar Crest College<br><strong><em>Cathy Swick</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Trine University<br><strong><em>Mark D. Ward</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, University of Dubuque<br><strong><em>Robert A. Wilson</em></strong>, Provost, Cedar Crest College<br></blockquote></blockquote> <br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Collegiate Mental Health in the Past Decade: Recent Trends, the Impact of COVID-19, and Next Steps</strong> workshop:<br> <blockquote><h3>Case Studies in Effective Campus Wellness Initiatives</h3>This session will provide several examples of effective campus wellness initiatives.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Marianne Ward-Peradoza</em></strong>, Provost, St. Edward’s University (TX) <br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Mental Health and Wellness for the Campus Community: Strategic Thought and Action</h3>This discussion session will be led by President Ladany of Oglethorpe University. Professionally a leader in this area, his campus is making health and well-being the centerpiece of their strategic plan and campaign.  He will provide important background information on how and why Oglethorpe decided to focus so sharply on mental health in their community. There will be plenty of time for discussion.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nicholas Ladany</em></strong>, President, Oglethorpe University<br></blockquote></blockquote> <br>Follow- up sessions for the <strong>Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion</strong> workshop:<br> <blockquote><h3>Creating an Inclusive Campus—Case Reports</h3>This session will present examples of successful programs that have built a genuine culture of belonging for all students. Panelists will explore the distinctive elements that made their initiatives successful and the metrics they use to assess that, as well as the path they took to build campus-wide acceptance.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Angela Haddad</em></strong>, Provost, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Lisa Perfetti</em></strong>, Provost, The College of Wooster<br><strong><em>Heather Moore Roberson</em></strong>, Director of Faculty Diversity and Inclusion and Associate Professor of Community & Justice Studies and Black Studies, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Ann M. Vendrely</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, Goshen College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Effective Practices in Supporting Diverse Student Populations</h3>This panel showcases exemplary programs and practices that support minority students on different campuses. The examples showcased on this panel have been selected because of their impact on minority students on their campuses. Participants at this session will leave with examples of what is possible and how they can implement similar programs on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Laura Lowe Furge</em></strong>, Provost, Muhlenberg College<br></blockquote></blockquote> <br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Tenacious Independent Education</strong> workshop:<br> <blockquote><h3>Navigating A Challenging Landscape: Endowments and Financial Sustainability in Higher-Ed</h3>Through the lens of a case study with Emory & Henry College President John Wells, panelists will touch on specific decision points faced by Emory & Henry and explore how endowment considerations can inform discussions around enrollment, diversity, geographic competitiveness, and navigation of the looming demographic cliff. This session will examine the vital role an endowment plays in balancing the very real enterprise needs of today against the uncertain needs of tomorrow. At the end of this panel, participants will be equipped with critical questions which will support important cross-functional discussions related to the role the endowment ideally plays across an institution.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>David Brief</em></strong>, CFA, Senior Managing Director & Partner, Angeles Investments<br><strong><em>Garry Duncan</em></strong>, CAIA, Managing Director, Angeles Investments<br><strong><em>Sapna Shah</em></strong>, CFA & CAIA, Managing Director, Angeles Investments <br> <strong> <em>John W. Wells</em></strong>, President, Emory & Henry College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Supporting Student Career Readiness Through High Impact Practices</h3>Institutions that focus on liberal arts programming often engage in high impact and hands-on experiences that put their students at an advantage for work post-graduation, and prepares them well for entering graduate programs. Some of these practices include undergraduate research, integrative learning, programs that connect directly to career preparation, and importantly, effective advising, which ensures that students are taking the right classes to prepare them for their chosen careers. This panel will showcase how two institutions have successfully navigated these processes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Eric Boynton</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Beloit College<br><strong><em>Leslie Davidson</em></strong>, Vice President for Enrollment, Beloit College<br><strong><em>Susan Larson</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Concordia College (MN)<br></blockquote></blockquote> <br>Follow-up sessions for the <strong>Using Data for Institutional Effectiveness</strong> workshop:<br> <blockquote><h3>How Institutions Use Data to Drive Enrollment, Innovation, and Financial Sustainability</h3>Data and its analysis provide campus leaders with a common language to collaborate, promote innovation across campus, and take actions to futureproof their institutions. Leaders often need to answer questions like, “How do I increase enrollment of the best-fit students?” “Will a specific new academic program be viable and align with our institutional vision?” or “What does the financial health of our institution look like? Those types of data-informed discussions can strengthen cross-campus collaboration, leading to better outcomes for both students and the institution. During this session, a few CIC member institutions will share best practices and some examples of how data has been a conduit for collaboration and innovation.<br> <br> <h3>Making the Case with Data</h3>The 2022 CIC Member Engagement Survey revealed that presidents and provosts were very interested in having access to and using data to make strategic decisions. Over a third of the indicators in the CIC Key Indicators Tool (KIT) relate to faculty and instructional resources. Understanding these key indicators and their relationships to each other can help CAOs and CFOs maximize the benefit of current expenditures on instruction and provide guidance as to whether the current level of support is adequate to achieve institutional mission. This session will have three parts: an explanation of the relevant key indicators; the use of a case study to show how the indicators can be used to frame discussions of instructional support; and a discussion of the situation on your own campus. Parts two and three will involve small group discussions in a workshop format. Questions and discussion are welcome about how institutions can use this and other data to make the case for institutional needs, priorities, and mission.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jason Rivera</em></strong>, Director of Strategic Research, CIC<br><strong><em>Michael Williams</em></strong>, Senior Advisor for Institutional Effectiveness and Research, CIC</blockquote></blockquote>

 

 

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Concurrent Sessions

The below listing of sessions planned to date will be held on Sunday, November 6, or Tuesday, November 8. (The sessions on Monday, November 7, are aligned with the Foundational Workshop topics). As additional speakers and sessions are confirmed and as sessions are assigned to specific time slots, this website will be updated.


Attracting and Retaining a Student Population that Meets Academic, Enrollment, and Financial Needs

Within independent higher education, institutions are unique in their missions, in who they serve, and how they program the educational experience for their students. It is essential to manage enrollment to ensure that enough tuition is generated to keep the institution in operation, particularly at institutions with smaller endowments and fewer avenues for generating revenue. This panel will discuss the importance of and examples of strategic collaboration between academic affairs, enrollment management, and business affairs working in alignment to attract and retain cohorts of students who can benefit from the academic program and generate the tuition required to run the institution.
Andrew R. Bressette, Vice President for Enrollment Management, Berry College
Cindy Marlow McClenagan, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Wayland Baptist University
Brad Reeder, Assistant Vice President for Financial Services, Berry College

Budgeting Within Our (Limited) Means: A CAO/CFO/CEMO Collaboration

The CAO/CFO/CEMO from University of St. Francis will share their institution’s journey from traditional, rigid operational planning exercises to a more transparent, robust workgroup/budget and planning committee model. Learn how a small, tuition-dependent institution improved their budgeting process to not only include more faculty and staff in the process, but ensure that the entire university budgets within its financial means each year.
Julee Gard, Vice President for Administration and Finance, University of St. Francis (IL)
Beth Roth, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, University of St. Francis (IL)
Eric Wignall, Vice President for Admissions and Enrollment Services, University of St. Francis (IL)

Building a Culture of Transfer across the Institution: Lessons from Transfer Pathways Initiatives

Transfer pathways are designed to provide community college transfer students with clear guidelines to achieve a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choosing. For these students to achieve their goals and thrive, they require multi-faceted support across admissions, advising, academic programs, and financial aid. In this session, two institutional teams will share their insights into building a strong culture of transfer on campus to complement the creation of new, discipline-specific transfer pathways. Both institutions are participants in Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts projects, jointly sponsored by the Teagle Foundation and the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations.
Nancy J. Evangelista, Provost, Muskingum University
Jeff Frederick, Provost, Wingate University
Melissa Perdue, Chief Financial Officer, Wingate University
Marcy Ritzert, Vice President for Enrollment, Muskingum University

Continuous Transformation for Sustainable Business Models

Innovation is not a one-step process. An experienced college president who is now a higher education financial consultant and a currently serving chief financial officer will share how building a culture of continuous transformation can result in strong, sustainable business models. In this structured session, participants will engage in a three-part exercise that includes an evaluation of their institution’s financial sustainability; assessment of the systems and structures in place that impact its ability to embrace a transformation mindset; and examples of strategies deployed in the continuous model that includes a tactical deployment of limited resources.
Arthur Snyder, President Emeritus, Indiana Institute of Technology, and Consultant, NACUBO Consulting

Cross-divisional Partnerships and Collaboration

Institutions of higher education, like other organizations, have long recognized the importance of cross-divisional collaboration in achieving missions and goals. Collaboration produces a synergy that yields more, saves more, and achieves more. And yet, many campuses are full of examples of where this does not happen. In difficult economic times it becomes even more important that people work together across silos to ensure the institutions are efficiently deploying their resources. This panel will share examples of how institutions efficiently utilize cross-divisional partnerships for effective processes and solutions.
Kendrick T. Brown, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morehouse College
Terry M. Keller, Provost, Lourdes University
Undria Stalling, Senior Vice President of Business and Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Morehouse College

Cultivating Leadership Teams that Work Well Together

This panel presents two successful models of intentionally cultivating leadership at different levels and among different groups on campus. Both have achieved remarkable success. One model describes a faculty leadership academy which has been in place for the past seven years. The presenter will share the central ingredients that have contributed to the success of the academy, and help others imagine how to develop or reshape a leadership program that best meets their institutions’ needs. The other model is a strategic enrollment council with participation from admissions, academic affairs, financial aid, student life, retention, marketing, athletics, student accounts, alumni/development, faculty, DEI, and IT participants. This model focuses on working across silos to find leaders who work well together for the benefit of the institution. Participants will leave with replicable examples of how to develop leaders who work well together.
Sarah Coen, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Enrollment Management, Transylvania University
Wendy Hilton-Morrow, Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Dean of the College, Augustana College (IL)

Developing Middle Talent: Connecting Key Leaders to Institutional Strategy and Vision

Middle talent see and experience problems and inefficiencies at the ground level, but they aren’t usually invited to be part of the solution to those problems. While it’s critically important for cabinet leaders and the president to be aligned around institutional future, it’s the middle talent who can bring the perspective of how systems and culture impact students and faculty members on a day-to-day basis. Connecting middle talent into the mission and vision of the institution while developing their individual skills, passions, and strengths is integral to not only employee fulfillment, but also to student success, retention, and culture change. This panel discussion will explore approaches to middle talent development at both organizational and institutional levels, identify key elements of focus in that development, and offer tools for engagement.


Examples of Forward-Looking Excellence

This panel will showcase a diverse sample of forward-looking initiatives on campuses to provoke creative thinking. Examples will include programs for student development and preparation for post-graduation work life, intentionally planned cross-divisional collaborations, and faculty development. How did these programs start? How do they function? Are there drawbacks to these models? How replicable are they?
Karla McCain, Provost, Blackburn College
Elaine Meyer-Lee, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Goucher College
Wendy Sherman Heckler, Provost and Senior Vice President, Otterbein University

Identifying and Mentoring the Next Generation of Academic Leaders

As the baby boom generation retires and the great resignation from academia proceeds, the need for academic leaders is great. This session will focus on how to identify all potential academic leaders within the faculty and staff, including those that may have historically been overlooked, offer them the encouragement and experiences necessary to prepare them for the role of Chief Academic Officer, and provide new CAOs with coaching and mentoring to help them succeed. Presenters will share their own paths to academic leadership and discuss the experiences they found most useful.
Susan R. Burns, President, College of Mount Saint Vincent
Graciela Caneiro-Livingston, Provost, Nebraska Wesleyan University
Christopher Spicer, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morningside University
Alden Stout, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Newman University (KS)
Carol Traupman-Carr, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian University

Inclusive Pedagogy/Inclusive Teaching

As student populations become more diverse and campus leaders become more attentive to long neglected inequities, effective institutions are finding ways to make learner experience more equitable. Panelists will discuss the forms that inclusive pedagogy has taken on their campuses. What type of training do faculty receive? Are they rewarded for doing it right? What is the level of adoption on campuses? What challenges have proponents of this type of teaching faced?
Tracy S. Parkinson, Executive Vice President and Provost, Mars Hill University
A. Gillian Stewart-Wells, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Judson University

Introducing Badges, Micro-credentials, and Certificates with Credit Bearing Programs

Higher education is in crisis and with the imminent demographic cliff, institutions are looking to expand access to non-traditional, non-degree-seeking students. Additionally, institutions are focusing on creating a pathway to career-readiness for students on their campuses. Badges and micro-credentials provide an avenue for students to document the totality of their learning experience, including skills that do not fall neatly within majors. This panel will showcase examples of how campuses have integrated these special credentials into their programs. One institution has done much in this area through partnerships with high schools, community colleges, and businesses. In addition, it has added stackable credentials, digital badging, PLA, and professional development programming. Another campus is engaging in interesting experimental work in this area. Panelists will talk about their successes and challenges.
D. Nathan Phinney, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Northwestern College (IA)
Eden Wales Freedman, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Clarke University

Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes

As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.
Jim Hundrieser, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO
George Stiell, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College

Improving Science Pedagogy on Your Campus

Making science accessible to students has been a major challenge. To address this concern and enhance the effectiveness of science education, CIC held a Seminar on Science Pedagogy, funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation. In this session, participating campus team leaders will discuss the impact of the seminar on faculty members and students at their institutions and how that impact can be sustained and serve as a foundation for additional growth. Did implementing the new interactive methods or techniques in courses improve overall inclusivity and participation in class? Were faculty members more willing to discuss pedagogy challenges and innovations with colleagues? How can CAOs support and encourage faculty members who are trying new methods or techniques?
Amanda J. Brosnahan, Dean, College of Health and Science and Associate Professor of Biology, Concordia University, St. Paul
Eva Lovas, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Nebraska Methodist College
Ian J. Rhile, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Albright College

Integrating Planning and Budgeting to Enhance Equitable Student Outcomes

As more institutions prioritize access, retention, and completion, there is a need to identify how institutions can strategically finance equitable student outcomes. This session will explore ways to reconsider campus planning and budgeting processes with a DEI lens, as well as how to build in strategies that prioritize equitable solutions. Panelists will share a potential framework to analyze the ROI linked to equity-based activities to ensure they are sustained and measured.
Jim Hundrieser, Vice President, Consulting and Business Development, NACUBO
George Stiell, Senior Vice President for Business, Finance, and Strategic Retention, Wiley College

Shared Governance and Academic Freedom

As numerous institutions move from a college to university model, and as the need to become nimbler and more responsive in management styles becomes more palpable and pressing, the more shared governance must evolve. This panel presents the example of an institution that has spent time reworking its shared governance model—moving from divisions to schools and a college—and is now working to develop faculty leaders who will operationalize the new system. The other presenter will talk about driving change within shared governance and share models for success.
Colin Irvine, Provost and Executive Vice President, Augustana University (SD)
Nancy G. Schreiber, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Salve Regina University

The Library as a Shared Space Focused on Student Success

The library has long been considered the heart of the campus, and is now re-inventing that role to anticipate the changing needs of students. Building on traditional library strengths as a community center and collaborator, libraries are increasingly sharing spaces with academic success units, from career centers to peer tutoring services to information technology help desks. How can these departments retain their important individual identities and purposes, yet also fuse their services and energies to create an updated, dynamic approach to support student success? This session will explore potential benefits to these collaborative partnerships including as a tool for recruitment and cost-saving. Learn how to plan for a transition to a student success model in a library, and gain insight into best practices for enabling integration of academic success services among new building partners.
Karen A. Campbell, Provost and Senior Vice President, Albright College
Joan Ruelle, Dean of the Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University
Andrew Pearson, Director of the Forrer Learning Commons, Bridgewater College
Chair: Luke Vilelle, University Librarian, Wyndham Robertson Library, Hollins University, and Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Liaison to CIC

Pre-Institute Workshops

Workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. The registration fee covers materials, meals, and refreshments. To add a workshop to an existing Institute registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at ttruscott@cic.edu. Fees: early rate $85 (by September 2); regular rate $110 (after September 2)


 New CAOs


Workshop for New Chief Academic Officers

Saturday, November 5
7:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Chief academic officers who have served for fewer than two years are invited to participate in this workshop, led by experienced colleagues, that addresses issues that newer CAOs often face. Participants will work in small groups, analyze case studies, and discuss such topics as accreditation; assessment and institutional effectiveness; faculty governance and leadership; appointments, promotions, and tenure and its alternatives; managing time, technology, and paper; and working with peer administrators. Participants will be paired with an experienced CAO mentor.

Workshop Coordinators

(see bios below the schedule)
Travis Frampton, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Schreiner University
Lori Werth, Provost, University of Pikeville

7:15–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast


8:00–8:05 a.m.

Welcome

Titi Ufomata, Senior Vice President for Academic Programs, CIC

8:05–8:45 a.m.

Introductions

Travis Frampton and Lori Werth
    
8:45–10:00 a.m.

Developing Professional Relationships to Meet New Expectations

Logan C. Hampton, President, Lane College
Moderator: Lori Werth
    
10:00–10:15 a.m.

Reflection and Break


10:15 a.m.–Noon

Case Studies

Moderator: Travis Frampton

Jeffrey A. Frick, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Washington & Jefferson College
Marisa Greer, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Union College (KY)
Brenda Kelly, Provost and Dean of the College, Gustavus Adolphus College
Tracy Parkinson, Executive Vice President and Provost, Mars Hill University
D. Nathan Phinney, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Northwestern
College (IA)
Janet B. Sommers, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Northwestern-St. Paul
Mark Ward, Provost, University of Dubuque

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Reflection and Lunch


1:00–1:05 p.m.

Afternoon Welcome

Marjorie Hass, President, CIC

1:05–2:50 p.m.

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS

Moderator: Lori Werth
  • Accreditation, Assessment, and Institutional Effectiveness
  • Board Relations
  • Crisis Management: After COVID and Beyond
  • Diversity and Inclusion on Campus: Faculty, Curriculum, and Student Life
  • Faculty Governance and Faculty Leadership
  • Risk Management
  • Student Retention and Success
  • Wellness: Mind, Body, Spirit
  • Working with the Cabinet
  • Work-Life Integration

2:50–3:00 p.m.

Reflection and Break


3:00–3:45 p.m.

What Am I Learning about Myself? What Will I Take Back to Campus?

Moderators: Travis Frampton and Lori Werth
    
3:45–4:00 p.m.

Mentors Meet New Chief Academic Officers

Mentor Coordinators:
Elissa Heil, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Wilson College
Stephen D. Stahl, Provost, Baldwin Wallace University

4:00 p.m.

Workshop for New Chief Academic Officers Adjourns


Travis Frampton
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Schreiner University

Travis Frampton became provost and vice president of Schreiner University in Texas in 2019. He previously served Hardin-Simmons University as vice president for university mission and strategic vision and professor of religion. His scholarly work focuses on the history of biblical interpretation. In 2001–2002, he was a Fulbright Scholar in the Netherlands, where he studied early modern philosophy and hermeneutics at Erasmus University Rotterdam. He earned a PhD in philosophy from Erasmus University Rotterdam and a PhD in religion from Baylor University.

Lori Werth
Provost, University of Pikeville

Lori Werth is provost of the University of Pikeville in Kentucky, where she leads academic affairs, athletics, admissions, institutional research, student services, and student success, as well as the Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine and Kentucky College of Optometry. During her 25 years of higher education experience, she has served in a range of positions, including vice president for enrollment management, associate professor of education, and department chair. Werth has worked closely to develop new programs and maintain institutional accreditation. This past year, Werth was selected as a Fulbright Scholar to Japan, where she had the opportunity to learn about Japan’s education system as well as establish networks of U.S. and international colleagues.

 Third or Forth Year CAOs


Workshop for Chief Academic Officers in Their Third or Fourth Year of Service

Saturday, November 5
7:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Entering the third or fourth year of service, chief academic officers usually have mastered the fundamentals of the role. At this stage, CAOs discover greater opportunities to lead rather than simply manage. What are the key questions CAOs can and should address at this stage in their careers? For example, how do CAOs balance attention to their institutions’ immediate issues with a focus on their long-term academic needs? How can CAOs attend to their own professional lives while also serving their institutions? How do CAOs work effectively with the president and other cabinet officers on strategic planning? Participants will explore these and related questions and gain fresh perspective on the next stage in their careers as CAOs.
    

Workshop Coordinators

(see bios below the schedule)
Kimberly A. Coplin, Provost, Denison University
John D. Kolander, Provost, Wisconsin Lutheran College

Discussion Facilitators

Lauren Bowen, Provost, Juniata College
Richard Ice, Provost, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University
Lisa Perfetti, Provost, The College of Wooster

7:15 a.m.

Breakfast


8:00–8:10 a.m.

Welcome

Jonnie G. Guerra, Senior Advisor, CIC

8:10–9:15 a.m.

Introductions and Framing the Day

Kim Coplin and John Kolander

9:15–10:15 a.m.

Reflecting on the Moment and Assessing the Challenges

Kim Coplin

10:15–10:30 a.m.

Break


10:30–11:30 a.m.

The CAO as Cultural Architect: Opportunities in Leadership    

John Kolander

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Lunch


12:30–1:45 p.m.

“It’s Alright”: Finding Fulfillment as a CAO

John Kolander

1:45–2:00 p.m.

Break    


2:00–3:15 p.m.

Vision and Strategy in Times of Change

Kim Coplin

3:15–4:00 p.m.

What Did We Miss? What’s Keeping You Up at Night?

A discussion with all participants and facilitators around pressing issues.

4:00 p.m.

Workshop for Chief Academic Officers in Their Third or Fourth Year of Service Adjourns



Kimberly A. Coplin
Provost, Denison University

Kimberly A. Coplin is provost of Denison University in Ohio. Under her leadership, and with faculty approval, the university has launched innovative academic majors in global commerce, data analytics, journalism, and health, exercise, and sport studies; concentrations in financial economics and Middle East and North African studies; and the Denison Seminars program. Coplin joined Denison, her undergraduate alma mater, in 1993 as a faculty member in the department of physics and astronomy and served the university as both department chair and associate provost before being named to her current position in 2013. Her research interests include experimental condensed matter physics, with a focus on novel electronic materials and in the biophysics of human movement.

John D. Kolander
Provost, Wisconsin Lutheran College

John D. Kolander, provost of Wisconsin Lutheran College, has served as the college’s chief academic officer since 2004. Previously, he was a teacher and administrator for Lutheran elementary and high schools in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Kolander’s research interests include campus and organization culture, curriculum development, and leadership development. He is a frequent presenter at CIC’s Workshops for Department and Division Chairs and Institute for Chief Academic Officers and received the CIC Chief Academic Officer Award in 2018.

Meetings of Affinity Groups

The Institute for Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Chief Enrollment Officers will provide opportunities for formal and informal meetings of other groups in conjunction with the conference. Meetings scheduled to date include:


Friday, November 4


Network of ELCA Colleges and Universities (NECU) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Friday, November 4, 2:00–6:00 pm, for a program followed by a reception and dinner at 6:00–8:00 p.m.
Coordinator: Mark Wilhelm, Executive Director, Network of Colleges and Universities, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Saturday, November 5


Concordia University System Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Saturday, November 5, 10:00 a.m.–Noon.
Coordinator: Tim Preuss, Provost, Concordia University Nebraska

Marpeck Mennonite Chief Academic Officers will meet Saturday, November 5, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Coordinator: Ann Vendrely, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, Goshen College

Sunday, November 6


Association of Colleges of Sisters of Saint Joseph Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Monday, November 6, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.
Coordinator: Christopher Dougherty, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Chestnut Hill College

New American Colleges and Universities (NACU) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet for a reception Sunday, November 6, at 6:30 p.m.


Monday, November 7


Annapolis Group Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.
Coordinator: Jeffery A. Frick, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Washington and Jefferson College

Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.
Coordinator: Daryll H. Coleman, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lane College

New American Colleges and Universities (NACU) Chief Academic Officers will meet Monday, November 7, 7:30–8:45 a.m. for breakfast and discussion.
Coordinator: Sean Creighton, President, New American Colleges and Universities

New American Colleges and Universities (NACU) Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet separately for lunch and networking sessions Monday, November 7, 12:15–1:15 p.m.
Coordinator: Sean Creighton, President, New American Colleges and Universities

Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Monday, November 7, 6:30 p.m. for dinner and discussion.
Coordinator: Lori Werth, Provost, University of Pikeville

Council for Christian Colleges & Universities Chief Academic, Chief Financial, and Chief Enrollment Officers will meet Monday, November 7, 6:30 p.m. for dinner.
Coordinator: Stan Rosenberg, Vice President for Research and Scholarship, Council for Christian Colleges & Universities

Tuesday, November 8 and Wednesday, November 9


Christian College Consortium Chief Academic Officers and Spouses will meet Tuesday, November 8, 12:15–5:00 p.m. with dinner at 6:00 p.m. The meeting continues Wednesday, November 9, 8:00 a.m.–Noon beginning with breakfast.
Coordinator: James H. (Jay) Barnes III, President, Christian College Consortium

Hotel and Travel

 Location

Sheraton Dallas Hotel

400 North Olive Street
Dallas, Texas 75201
(214) 922-8000

 Hotel Information


All program sessions of the Institute will be held at the Sheraton Dallas hotel.

Room Rate:
$176 Traditional King Room

Please Note the Hotel Reservation Procedure: Participants first need to register for the Institute in order to make a hotel reservation at the CIC discounted rate. Reservation details including a dedicated link will be provided to Institute participants with the confirmation email once registration is completed.

The hotel reservation deadline is Monday, October 3, 2022. Hotel rooms may sell out before the deadline, so participants are encouraged to register for the Institute and reserve their hotel rooms as soon as possible. Please note that hotel reservations made after the deadline will be accommodated only on a space-available basis and may be at a rate higher than the CIC rate.

The CIC hotel rate of $176 for a traditional king guestroom includes complimentary in-room Wi-Fi for all Marriott Rewards members. The discounted rate may be available for rooms reserved for the period November 2–November 11, 2022, for participants who would like to extend their stay. Please be aware that rooms on the extended dates are limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The Sheraton Dallas Hotel is located in the heart of the arts and financial district of downtown Dallas and has been recently renovated. The hotel features several dining options (including a Grab ‘n Go market), an outdoor pool, and a fitness center, in addition to 1,840 renovated guest rooms. DART light rail offers easy access from the hotel to Dallas’s vibrant entertainment districts, including the Arts District, Uptown, and Deep Ellum. The hotel also is within walking distance of the Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas World Aquarium, and the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial.


DRESS GUIDELINES

Business casual wear is appropriate throughout the Institute.

 Travel

(All rates below as of June 2022).

The Sheraton Dallas Hotel is located approximately eight miles from Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL) and approximately 19 miles (25 minutes) from Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW). Transportation to the hotel is available from several providers that are located just outside the baggage claim area of each airport.


Taxicabs

Taxicabs are available at both Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL) and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW).

DAL—Taxis are located on the transportation lower level, directly across from the terminal ramp. Passengers must cross the street toward parking Garage A to reach taxi stand. The estimated fare to the Sheraton Dallas Hotel is $30 one-way.

DFW—Taxis are located on the lower level of Terminals A, B, C, D, and E. The estimated fare to the Sheraton Dallas Hotel is $55 one-way.


Rideshares

Lyft and Uber are available at both Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL) and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW).

DAL—Located on the lower level downstairs from the Baggage Claim area with light blue signs stating “App Based Ride Service.”

DFW—Located on the lower level curbside of each terminal.

Estimated rideshare and taxi fares are $25 to $30 one-way from Dallas Love Field and $35 to $55 one-way from Dallas Fort Worth International Airport.


HOTEL PARKING

Self-parking at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel is $25 per day, and overnight valet parking is $40 per day, plus applicable taxes.
 

Sponsors

​​CIC is grateful to the following sponsors (to date) for their support of the Institute:

 Signature

 

 

Task Force

Chief Academic Officers Task Force

The program of the 2022 Institute is being planned with the assistance of CIC’s Chief Academic Officers with Chief Financial and Chief Enrollment Officers Task Force, along with representatives from NACUBO and AACRAO. Members include:

J. Andrew Prall, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University (Chair)
Barbara Aranda-Naranjo, Chief Academic Office and Provost, University of the Incarnate Word
Christon Arthur, Provost, Andrews University
Robert S. Blue, Vice President for Finance and Administration, Centenary College of Louisiana
Andrew R. Bressette, Vice President for Enrollment Management, Berry College
Jeffrey Frick, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Washington & Jefferson College
Kerry Fulcher, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Point Loma Nazarene University
Julee Gard, Vice President for Administration and Finance, University of St. Francis (IL)
Glenell M. Lee-Pruitt, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Jarvis Christian College
Lisa Long, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Allen University
Beth M. Schwartz, Provost, Endicott College
Lori Werth, Provost, University of Pikeville
Titi Ufomata, Senior Vice President for Academic Programs, Council of Independent Colleges

Association Representatives

Tina DeNeen, Associate Executive Director, Meetings and Partnerships,
American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
Randy Roberson, Vice President, Leadership Development, National Association of College and University Business Officers