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All-Institute ReceptionAll-Institute Reception47Spouses and Partners<p>After an afternoon of workshops and sessions, it will be time to reconnect and enjoy each other’s company. All Institute participants—including spouses, sponsors, and guests— are invited to gather for drinks, refreshments, and conversation.<br></p>
BreakfastBreakfast17
Breakfast and Roundtable DiscussionsBreakfast and Roundtable Discussions10Discussion sessions on Sunday and Monday mornings will provide opportunities to gain practical advice from colleagues.<br><br>Monday’s sessions will focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion and student success. Potential topics:<br> <ul><li>Advising Partnerships for Student Success</li><li>Assessing Campus Climate</li><li>Defining the Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer Role</li><li>Developing an LGBTQ-Friendly Campus</li><li>How CIC Colleges and Universities Are Changing to Eradicate Systemic Racism on Campus</li><li>Identifying and Developing Faculty Leaders for Equity</li><li>Innovative Student Leadership Programs</li><li>New Approaches to Student Orientation Programs</li><li>Serving Noncitizen Students</li><li>Setting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Goals</li><li>Student Activism on Campus</li></ul> Discussion facilitators will be experienced colleagues with insights to offer on each topic. Please suggest additional topics or nominate a discussion leader, or volunteer to serve as one, by contacting Jonnie G. Guerra, CIC senior advisor, at <a href="mailto:jguerra@cic.nche.edu">jguerra@cic.nche.edu</a>.
Breakfast and Roundtable DiscussionsBreakfast and Roundtable Discussions82<p>Discussion sessions on Sunday and Monday mornings will provide opportunities to gain practical advice from colleagues.<br><br>Sunday’s sessions will focus on resilience and recovery. Potential topics:<br></p><ul><li>Best Practices for Faculty Handbook Revision</li><li>Emerging from the Pandemic Stronger and Better</li><li>Enrollment Trends Post-Pandemic</li><li>Faculty Exhaustion: From Burnout to Thriving</li><li>Faculty Workload: Best Practices for Equity</li><li>Harnessing Technology to Improve Student Mental Health</li><li>Is Agile Shared Governance an Oxymoron?</li><li>Long-Term Effects of the Online Pivot on Our Campuses</li><li>Mentoring Your Leadership Team</li><li>Remote Work Policies for 2021 and Beyond</li><li>Strategies for Global Education and Study Abroad</li><li>Supporting Contingent Faculty Members</li><li>Vaccination and Other Safety Mandates</li><li>What We Learned about Our Students during the Pandemic</li></ul> Discussion facilitators will be experienced colleagues with insights to offer on each topic. Please suggest additional topics or nominate a discussion leader, or volunteer to serve as one, by contacting Jonnie G. Guerra, CIC senior advisor, at <a href="mailto:jguerra@cic.nche.edu">jguerra@cic.nche.edu</a>.
Breakfast for Alumni of CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission ProgramBreakfast for Alumni of CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission Program17Alumni of and current participants in CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission program are invited to gather for breakfast and conversation.<br><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, CIC</blockquote>
CAO/CSAO Task Force MeetingCAO/CSAO Task Force Meeting60<p>​<em>(By invitation only)</em><br></p>
Closing Plenary PanelClosing Plenary Panel22Eva Chatterjee-Sutton; Leanne Neilson; Monica Smith; Kevin KrugerPlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>​Collaborating to Build the Future Campus</h3> <br>Significant pressure creates significant opportunity. Independent colleges and universities made major adjustments at a rapid pace under the pressures of 2020—including large-scale changes to course delivery and student services in response to the global health pandemic and urgent calls for racial justice. The last year and a half has shown that higher education is capable of shifting more rapidly than many thought possible to meet the evolving needs of students and the nation. Some recent changes will be embraced permanently, some will be deemed no longer necessary, and others will influence institutional strategy across divisions for the foreseeable future. What decisions do campuses face today that will most significantly shape their futures? Distinguished panelists—senior campus leaders with experience working collaboratively to drive strategic change—will share ways that institutional leadership teams can collaborate to build a future focused on both student and institutional success.<br><blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>Kevin Kruger</em></strong>, President, NASPA–Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education<br>Chair: <strong> <em>Marjorie Hass</em></strong>, President-elect, CIC</blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions8Concurrent Session<em>(Most concurrent sessions will take place on Sunday; others are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday. Additional sessions and speakers will be added to the CIC website as they are confirmed.)</em><br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Adapting Living-Learning Communities to Post-COVID-19 Realities</h3>For more than a decade, living-learning communities have been an effective and popular student success strategy, one that CIC colleges and universities highlight as an example of integrated learning on their campuses. How are CIC institutions revisiting this popular and successful practice post-pandemic? Two teams of academic and student life officers will discuss how their living-learning community programs are evolving and what innovations are being planned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jon Dooley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marlin Nabors</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Aswani K. Volety</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Elon University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Athletics and Academics: Academic and Student Affairs as Team Sport</h3>Athletics are an important element of the student experience at many CIC institutions, and effective collaboration between academic and  student affairs professionals is key to student athletes’ academic success. Athletics departments have had to adapt in response to new public health requirements and dramatically different schedules for competition. How will these challenges shape ongoing collaboration between academic and student affairs departments? How can CAOs and CSAOs together help student athletes excel both in the classroom and on the playing field? Chief academic and student affairs officers of three CIC institutions will describe how campus colleagues have adapted and planned for future athletic and academic success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jeffrey R. Breese</em></strong>, Provost, University of Mount Union<br><strong><em>Debora D’Anna</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Brevard College<br><strong><em>William (Rusty) Kennedy</em></strong>, Vice President of Admissions and Athletics, Midway University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Authentic Community: Creating Lives of Consequence, Inquiry, and Accomplishment</h3>Through more than 1,000 interviews with 25- to 65-year-old college graduates, social psychologist Richard Detweiler gathered powerful evidence that a liberal arts education experienced in “authentic community” leads to the most positive long-term outcomes. In <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (2021) he provides the data to back up many often-repeated claims about the impact of the liberal arts on adult lives of leadership, altruism, continued learning, cultural involvement, fulfillment, and success. In conversation with provost Lauren Bowen of Juniata College, and in response to questions from session participants, Detweiler will explore the implications of his research for<br>the work of academic, student affairs, and diversity officers.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Great Lakes College Association, and author of <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (forthcoming, 2021)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building Processes to Support Underprepared Students’ Success</h3>Student success depends on supporting timely degree completion. This session will highlight a proven approach to increasing degree completion by strengthening readiness and retention at all stages of<br>a student’s undergraduate career. The CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC) has succeeded on dozens of participating campuses by increasing opportunities for students to stay on track with their academic programs or even to get ahead. Panelists will discuss how the CIC-OCSC has helped students on their campuses overcome challenges and move toward completion of their academic programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian College<br><strong><em>Jamila S. Lyn</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, Acadeum’s Center of Excellence, and Director of Specialized Programming, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3>“Calling” across the (Co-)Curriculum: Academic and Student Affairs Collaborate to Foster Vocational Exploration </h3>CIC institutions are finding new ways to help undergraduate students examine questions of meaning, purpose, and identity. One approach employs the venerable concept of “finding one’s calling” to encourage students to integrate academic study in professional and liberal arts disciplines with non- academic career preparation. In this panel, two pairs of administrative colleagues will describe how academic affairs and student affairs offices can collaborate to make vocational exploration and discernment a powerful aspect of student experience through programming for students and professional development for staff and faculty members.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Connie Carson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Furman University<br><strong><em>Michael (Mike) Hayes</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Development, Lee University<br><strong><em>Deborah Murray</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lee University<br><strong><em>Ken Peterson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Furman University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Career Readiness and Curricular Integration<br></h3>Given public skepticism of the value of college as career preparation, how can institutions ensure that students benefit from their distinctive educational missions while also gaining the skills and attitudes necessary for professional success? Two academic leaders from quite different institutions will share how they integrate career readiness training across a range of programs to ensure that students make a smooth transition into valuable work opportunities and successful career trajectories.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Sandra Dunbar-Smalley</em></strong>, Provost, AdventHealth University<br><strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Current Legal Issues in Higher Education</h3>It is critical, especially in the current regulatory and political environment, for senior campus leaders to be up-to-date in their understanding of key legal issues in higher education. An experienced higher education attorney will offer an update on the most important legal issues likely to affect independent colleges and universities in the near future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Managing Attorney, Novus Law Firm, Inc.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Expanding Esports at Independent Colleges</h3>CIC’s report <cite>Esports and Independent Colleges</cite> (2020) found that five out of six CIC member institutions had recently established some forms of esports on campus. Many colleges and universities are finding that the rapid expansion of esports programs, meant to attract and engage students, can lead to internal growing pains in the context of a dynamic external environment. What are the strategic issues that college leaders should consider as they initiate and expand esports programs? Leaders from institutions that have developed successful initiatives will outline promising approaches and describe challenges they faced as they launched or developed esports programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Davida H. Haywood</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<br><strong><em>Karen D. Morgan</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<strong><br><em>Tiffany Sanchez</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Stevenson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Free College Future?</h3>The “free college” movement has gained momentum over the past few years and President Biden is under pressure to act. The latest proposal is to provide all students with tuition benefits for community colleges in their home states. To date, several states have already implemented similar programs; several of these approaches were studied in CIC’s <cite>State “Free College” Programs: Implications for States and Independent Higher Education and Alternative Policy Approaches</cite> (2020). In this moderated conversation, CAOs from states that have already experimented with free college will share their experiences. They will discuss how state-level changes affected their institutions in order to help session participants anticipate the potential impact of a nationwide “free college” plan. Participants will share ideas about how an institution might thrive in a “free college” future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy Berner</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Provost, Sewanee: The University of the South<br><strong><em>Junius J. Gonzales</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, New York Institute of Technology<br><strong><em>Gregor Thuswaldner</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3> Innovative Strategies for First-Generation Student Success</h3>First-generation college students are encountering new challenges as campuses re-open after a year of remote learning, finding it more difficult to become accustomed to the routine of college life and acclimate to the anxieties of institutional culture. Senior administrators from institutions with innovative strategies to help students overcome these obstacles will share their approaches and lead a discussion of similarly successful efforts at other CIC member colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Keri Alioto</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Amy Badal</em></strong>, The Fritz Family Dean of Students, Bucknell University<br><strong><em>Karen Friedlen</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak</em></strong>, Provost, Bucknell University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Leveraging Consortial Collaboration: The Perspective of Association Leaders</h3>With accelerating change across higher education, inter-institutional collaboration is more important than ever. In this session, leaders of consortial organizations will explore the implications of a variety of models and initiatives for chief academic, student affairs, and diversity officers. They will highlight strategies for building a culture of collaboration both across—and within— institutions. Participants will develop and share ways they can further leverage the various consortia to which their institutions belong to increase the institutional benefits of inter-institutional collaboration.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities<br><strong><em>Stephanie L. Fabritius</em></strong>, President, Associated Colleges of the South<br><strong><em>Michael E. Hodge</em></strong>, Interim Executive Director, Atlanta University Center Consortium<br><strong><em>Michael A. (Mickey) McDonald</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Maximizing Student Achievement and Retention</h3>Initiatives to enhance student academic achievement and personal development are important points of collaboration between academic and student affairs divisions. What strategies effectively maximize the persistence to graduation, academic success, and personal growth of students? Through intentional cooperation and innovative student support models, campuses can implement a comprehensive program to promote student success. Academic and student development officers from two institutions will share approaches that have boosted both student achievement and retention on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Katherine Clay Bassard</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Michael W. Markowitz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Sherry L. Turner</em></strong>, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Abigail T. Wernicki</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Meghan Harte Weyant</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Rhodes College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Open Mic for Chief Academic, Student Affairs, and Diversity Officers</h3> <em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs, CSAOs, and CDOs.)</em><br>Participants will have the opportunity to seek practical advice from colleagues on pressing issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in independent higher education.<br> <blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University, and Chair, CIC CAO-CSAO Task Force<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><div><h3>Promoting Anti-Racism on Campus</h3>In light of goals for greater educational equity and social justice for students of color, campuses have stepped up efforts to incorporate anti-racism into their curricular and co-curricular offerings. Effective strategies are emerging: Some institutions have developed new organizational structures and created new initiatives to attain greater equity in learning outcomes and a more inclusive environment for students and employees. Leadership teams from two innovative institutions will describe their approaches to promoting anti-racism on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jennifer Bonds-Raacke</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>Leanna Fenneberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>John W. Miller Jr.</em></strong>, Dean of Curriculum and Senior Diversity Officer, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Promoting Students’ Civic Engagement</h3>New research by plenary speaker Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that key elements of civic engagement tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success. How are colleges and universities promoting and supporting civic engagement through both the curriculum and co-curricular programming? Following Hoyt’s plenary address, two pairs of senior leaders will discuss how their campuses encourage civic engagement.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Heather M. Black</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Ryan Flynn</em></strong>, Director of Community-Engaged Learning, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University<br></blockquote> <br> </div><h3>Recent and Anticipated Changes to Title IX</h3>Title IX requirements have undergone revisions in recent years, creating the need to adjust administrative practices at independent colleges and universities. What are the most important changes to guidelines and requirements that institutions need to be aware of in the current regulatory environment? What practices and campus policies are best suited to an equitable process? An experienced higher education attorney will provide timely and practical advice on Title IX compliance and risk management.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Member, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC</blockquote> <br> <div></div><div><h3>Strategic Academic Review and Realignment: An Iterative Process</h3>What do students need now for a 21st- century education? And what programs will attract students to your institution? Changing student demographics, emerging enrollment trends, and increasing societal expectations for direct outcomes-based learning lead many campuses to engage in academic restructuring and innovative program realignment. What is the right way to pace and structure these important but charged changes? Three chief academic officers will present case studies of the processes their institutions used to prioritize and restructure programs, the obstacles they faced, the results they achieved, and the strategies they employed to maintain campus morale. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss their own campus situations and to seek advice about how to gain support for necessary changes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Mary H. Van Brunt</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gwynedd Mercy University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategies for Difficult Campus Conversations</h3>Important and sensitive communication among institutional constituencies about the need for greater racial and gender justice became even more challenging under pandemic campus protocols. How can campus leaders address the sense of an urgent need for action on issues of social justice while managing external relations and helping reduce the trauma students and employees feel after a difficult year? Campus leaders will describe how their institutions have approached difficult conversations and offer lessons learned during the pandemic year.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Yolanda Barbier Gibson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Cameron J. McCoy</em></strong>, Provost, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Ryan Sandefer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica<br><strong><em>Linda Strong-Leek</em></strong>, Provost, Haverford College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Student Mental Health</h3>Mental health plays a critical role in student success, and supporting mental well-being is an important area of collaboration for academic and student affairs professionals. Stresses related to a pandemic, social unrest, and economic turmoil intensified student mental health issues; at the same time the shift to a primarily virtual student experience posed new challenges to the identification of need and delivery of services. What effective strategies have institutions employed to reach students, to monitor their mental health, and to offer help and support? And which of these interim strategies suggest opportunities to serve students effectively in the long run? Senior administrators will lead a discussion of lessons learned and strategies for the future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Deanne W. Hurley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Kathryn M. LaFontana</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Alexander Miller</em></strong>, Vice President of Student Development, Denison University</blockquote></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions13<em>(Most concurrent sessions will take place on Sunday; others are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday. Additional sessions and speakers will be added to the CIC website as they are confirmed.)</em><br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Adapting Living-Learning Communities to Post-COVID-19 Realities</h3>For more than a decade, living-learning communities have been an effective and popular student success strategy, one that CIC colleges and universities highlight as an example of integrated learning on their campuses. How are CIC institutions revisiting this popular and successful practice post-pandemic? Two teams of academic and student life officers will discuss how their living-learning community programs are evolving and what innovations are being planned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jon Dooley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marlin Nabors</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Aswani K. Volety</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Elon University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Athletics and Academics: Academic and Student Affairs as Team Sport</h3>Athletics are an important element of the student experience at many CIC institutions, and effective collaboration between academic and  student affairs professionals is key to student athletes’ academic success. Athletics departments have had to adapt in response to new public health requirements and dramatically different schedules for competition. How will these challenges shape ongoing collaboration between academic and student affairs departments? How can CAOs and CSAOs together help student athletes excel both in the classroom and on the playing field? Chief academic and student affairs officers of three CIC institutions will describe how campus colleagues have adapted and planned for future athletic and academic success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jeffrey R. Breese</em></strong>, Provost, University of Mount Union<br><strong><em>Debora D’Anna</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Brevard College<br><strong><em>William (Rusty) Kennedy</em></strong>, Vice President of Admissions and Athletics, Midway University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Authentic Community: Creating Lives of Consequence, Inquiry, and Accomplishment</h3>Through more than 1,000 interviews with 25- to 65-year-old college graduates, social psychologist Richard Detweiler gathered powerful evidence that a liberal arts education experienced in “authentic community” leads to the most positive long-term outcomes. In <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (2021) he provides the data to back up many often-repeated claims about the impact of the liberal arts on adult lives of leadership, altruism, continued learning, cultural involvement, fulfillment, and success. In conversation with provost Lauren Bowen of Juniata College, and in response to questions from session participants, Detweiler will explore the implications of his research for<br>the work of academic, student affairs, and diversity officers.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Great Lakes College Association, and author of <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (forthcoming, 2021)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building Processes to Support Underprepared Students’ Success</h3>Student success depends on supporting timely degree completion. This session will highlight a proven approach to increasing degree completion by strengthening readiness and retention at all stages of<br>a student’s undergraduate career. The CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC) has succeeded on dozens of participating campuses by increasing opportunities for students to stay on track with their academic programs or even to get ahead. Panelists will discuss how the CIC-OCSC has helped students on their campuses overcome challenges and move toward completion of their academic programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian College<br><strong><em>Jamila S. Lyn</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, Acadeum’s Center of Excellence, and Director of Specialized Programming, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3>“Calling” across the (Co-)Curriculum: Academic and Student Affairs Collaborate to Foster Vocational Exploration </h3>CIC institutions are finding new ways to help undergraduate students examine questions of meaning, purpose, and identity. One approach employs the venerable concept of “finding one’s calling” to encourage students to integrate academic study in professional and liberal arts disciplines with non- academic career preparation. In this panel, two pairs of administrative colleagues will describe how academic affairs and student affairs offices can collaborate to make vocational exploration and discernment a powerful aspect of student experience through programming for students and professional development for staff and faculty members.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Connie Carson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Furman University<br><strong><em>Michael (Mike) Hayes</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Development, Lee University<br><strong><em>Deborah Murray</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lee University<br><strong><em>Ken Peterson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Furman University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Career Readiness and Curricular Integration<br></h3>Given public skepticism of the value of college as career preparation, how can institutions ensure that students benefit from their distinctive educational missions while also gaining the skills and attitudes necessary for professional success? Two academic leaders from quite different institutions will share how they integrate career readiness training across a range of programs to ensure that students make a smooth transition into valuable work opportunities and successful career trajectories.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Sandra Dunbar-Smalley</em></strong>, Provost, AdventHealth University<br><strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Current Legal Issues in Higher Education</h3>It is critical, especially in the current regulatory and political environment, for senior campus leaders to be up-to-date in their understanding of key legal issues in higher education. An experienced higher education attorney will offer an update on the most important legal issues likely to affect independent colleges and universities in the near future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Managing Attorney, Novus Law Firm, Inc.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Expanding Esports at Independent Colleges</h3>CIC’s report <cite>Esports and Independent Colleges</cite> (2020) found that five out of six CIC member institutions had recently established some forms of esports on campus. Many colleges and universities are finding that the rapid expansion of esports programs, meant to attract and engage students, can lead to internal growing pains in the context of a dynamic external environment. What are the strategic issues that college leaders should consider as they initiate and expand esports programs? Leaders from institutions that have developed successful initiatives will outline promising approaches and describe challenges they faced as they launched or developed esports programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Davida H. Haywood</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<br><strong><em>Karen D. Morgan</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<strong><br><em>Tiffany Sanchez</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Stevenson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Free College Future?</h3>The “free college” movement has gained momentum over the past few years and President Biden is under pressure to act. The latest proposal is to provide all students with tuition benefits for community colleges in their home states. To date, several states have already implemented similar programs; several of these approaches were studied in CIC’s <cite>State “Free College” Programs: Implications for States and Independent Higher Education and Alternative Policy Approaches</cite> (2020). In this moderated conversation, CAOs from states that have already experimented with free college will share their experiences. They will discuss how state-level changes affected their institutions in order to help session participants anticipate the potential impact of a nationwide “free college” plan. Participants will share ideas about how an institution might thrive in a “free college” future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy Berner</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Provost, Sewanee: The University of the South<br><strong><em>Junius J. Gonzales</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, New York Institute of Technology<br><strong><em>Gregor Thuswaldner</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3> Innovative Strategies for First-Generation Student Success</h3>First-generation college students are encountering new challenges as campuses re-open after a year of remote learning, finding it more difficult to become accustomed to the routine of college life and acclimate to the anxieties of institutional culture. Senior administrators from institutions with innovative strategies to help students overcome these obstacles will share their approaches and lead a discussion of similarly successful efforts at other CIC member colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Keri Alioto</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Amy Badal</em></strong>, The Fritz Family Dean of Students, Bucknell University<br><strong><em>Karen Friedlen</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak</em></strong>, Provost, Bucknell University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Leveraging Consortial Collaboration: The Perspective of Association Leaders</h3>With accelerating change across higher education, inter-institutional collaboration is more important than ever. In this session, leaders of consortial organizations will explore the implications of a variety of models and initiatives for chief academic, student affairs, and diversity officers. They will highlight strategies for building a culture of collaboration both across—and within— institutions. Participants will develop and share ways they can further leverage the various consortia to which their institutions belong to increase the institutional benefits of inter-institutional collaboration.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities<br><strong><em>Stephanie L. Fabritius</em></strong>, President, Associated Colleges of the South<br><strong><em>Michael E. Hodge</em></strong>, Interim Executive Director, Atlanta University Center Consortium<br><strong><em>Michael A. (Mickey) McDonald</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Maximizing Student Achievement and Retention</h3>Initiatives to enhance student academic achievement and personal development are important points of collaboration between academic and student affairs divisions. What strategies effectively maximize the persistence to graduation, academic success, and personal growth of students? Through intentional cooperation and innovative student support models, campuses can implement a comprehensive program to promote student success. Academic and student development officers from two institutions will share approaches that have boosted both student achievement and retention on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Katherine Clay Bassard</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Michael W. Markowitz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Sherry L. Turner</em></strong>, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Abigail T. Wernicki</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Meghan Harte Weyant</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Rhodes College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Open Mic for Chief Academic, Student Affairs, and Diversity Officers</h3> <em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs, CSAOs, and CDOs.)</em><br>Participants will have the opportunity to seek practical advice from colleagues on pressing issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in independent higher education.<br> <blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University, and Chair, CIC CAO-CSAO Task Force<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><div><h3>Promoting Anti-Racism on Campus</h3>In light of goals for greater educational equity and social justice for students of color, campuses have stepped up efforts to incorporate anti-racism into their curricular and co-curricular offerings. Effective strategies are emerging: Some institutions have developed new organizational structures and created new initiatives to attain greater equity in learning outcomes and a more inclusive environment for students and employees. Leadership teams from two innovative institutions will describe their approaches to promoting anti-racism on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jennifer Bonds-Raacke</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>Leanna Fenneberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>John W. Miller Jr.</em></strong>, Dean of Curriculum and Senior Diversity Officer, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Promoting Students’ Civic Engagement</h3>New research by plenary speaker Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that key elements of civic engagement tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success. How are colleges and universities promoting and supporting civic engagement through both the curriculum and co-curricular programming? Following Hoyt’s plenary address, two pairs of senior leaders will discuss how their campuses encourage civic engagement.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Heather M. Black</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Ryan Flynn</em></strong>, Director of Community-Engaged Learning, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University<br></blockquote> <br> </div><h3>Recent and Anticipated Changes to Title IX</h3>Title IX requirements have undergone revisions in recent years, creating the need to adjust administrative practices at independent colleges and universities. What are the most important changes to guidelines and requirements that institutions need to be aware of in the current regulatory environment? What practices and campus policies are best suited to an equitable process? An experienced higher education attorney will provide timely and practical advice on Title IX compliance and risk management.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Member, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC</blockquote> <br> <div></div><div><h3>Strategic Academic Review and Realignment: An Iterative Process</h3>What do students need now for a 21st- century education? And what programs will attract students to your institution? Changing student demographics, emerging enrollment trends, and increasing societal expectations for direct outcomes-based learning lead many campuses to engage in academic restructuring and innovative program realignment. What is the right way to pace and structure these important but charged changes? Three chief academic officers will present case studies of the processes their institutions used to prioritize and restructure programs, the obstacles they faced, the results they achieved, and the strategies they employed to maintain campus morale. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss their own campus situations and to seek advice about how to gain support for necessary changes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Mary H. Van Brunt</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gwynedd Mercy University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategies for Difficult Campus Conversations</h3>Important and sensitive communication among institutional constituencies about the need for greater racial and gender justice became even more challenging under pandemic campus protocols. How can campus leaders address the sense of an urgent need for action on issues of social justice while managing external relations and helping reduce the trauma students and employees feel after a difficult year? Campus leaders will describe how their institutions have approached difficult conversations and offer lessons learned during the pandemic year.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Yolanda Barbier Gibson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Cameron J. McCoy</em></strong>, Provost, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Ryan Sandefer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica<br><strong><em>Linda Strong-Leek</em></strong>, Provost, Haverford College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Student Mental Health</h3>Mental health plays a critical role in student success, and supporting mental well-being is an important area of collaboration for academic and student affairs professionals. Stresses related to a pandemic, social unrest, and economic turmoil intensified student mental health issues; at the same time the shift to a primarily virtual student experience posed new challenges to the identification of need and delivery of services. What effective strategies have institutions employed to reach students, to monitor their mental health, and to offer help and support? And which of these interim strategies suggest opportunities to serve students effectively in the long run? Senior administrators will lead a discussion of lessons learned and strategies for the future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Deanne W. Hurley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Kathryn M. LaFontana</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Alexander Miller</em></strong>, Vice President of Student Development, Denison University</blockquote></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions5Concurrent Session<em>(Most concurrent sessions will take place on Sunday; others are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday. Additional sessions and speakers will be added to the CIC website as they are confirmed.)</em><br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Adapting Living-Learning Communities to Post-COVID-19 Realities</h3>For more than a decade, living-learning communities have been an effective and popular student success strategy, one that CIC colleges and universities highlight as an example of integrated learning on their campuses. How are CIC institutions revisiting this popular and successful practice post-pandemic? Two teams of academic and student life officers will discuss how their living-learning community programs are evolving and what innovations are being planned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jon Dooley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marlin Nabors</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Aswani K. Volety</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Elon University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Athletics and Academics: Academic and Student Affairs as Team Sport</h3>Athletics are an important element of the student experience at many CIC institutions, and effective collaboration between academic and  student affairs professionals is key to student athletes’ academic success. Athletics departments have had to adapt in response to new public health requirements and dramatically different schedules for competition. How will these challenges shape ongoing collaboration between academic and student affairs departments? How can CAOs and CSAOs together help student athletes excel both in the classroom and on the playing field? Chief academic and student affairs officers of three CIC institutions will describe how campus colleagues have adapted and planned for future athletic and academic success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jeffrey R. Breese</em></strong>, Provost, University of Mount Union<br><strong><em>Debora D’Anna</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Brevard College<br><strong><em>William (Rusty) Kennedy</em></strong>, Vice President of Admissions and Athletics, Midway University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Authentic Community: Creating Lives of Consequence, Inquiry, and Accomplishment</h3>Through more than 1,000 interviews with 25- to 65-year-old college graduates, social psychologist Richard Detweiler gathered powerful evidence that a liberal arts education experienced in “authentic community” leads to the most positive long-term outcomes. In <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (2021) he provides the data to back up many often-repeated claims about the impact of the liberal arts on adult lives of leadership, altruism, continued learning, cultural involvement, fulfillment, and success. In conversation with provost Lauren Bowen of Juniata College, and in response to questions from session participants, Detweiler will explore the implications of his research for<br>the work of academic, student affairs, and diversity officers.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Great Lakes College Association, and author of <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (forthcoming, 2021)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building Processes to Support Underprepared Students’ Success</h3>Student success depends on supporting timely degree completion. This session will highlight a proven approach to increasing degree completion by strengthening readiness and retention at all stages of<br>a student’s undergraduate career. The CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC) has succeeded on dozens of participating campuses by increasing opportunities for students to stay on track with their academic programs or even to get ahead. Panelists will discuss how the CIC-OCSC has helped students on their campuses overcome challenges and move toward completion of their academic programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian College<br><strong><em>Jamila S. Lyn</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, Acadeum’s Center of Excellence, and Director of Specialized Programming, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3>“Calling” across the (Co-)Curriculum: Academic and Student Affairs Collaborate to Foster Vocational Exploration </h3>CIC institutions are finding new ways to help undergraduate students examine questions of meaning, purpose, and identity. One approach employs the venerable concept of “finding one’s calling” to encourage students to integrate academic study in professional and liberal arts disciplines with non- academic career preparation. In this panel, two pairs of administrative colleagues will describe how academic affairs and student affairs offices can collaborate to make vocational exploration and discernment a powerful aspect of student experience through programming for students and professional development for staff and faculty members.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Connie Carson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Furman University<br><strong><em>Michael (Mike) Hayes</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Development, Lee University<br><strong><em>Deborah Murray</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lee University<br><strong><em>Ken Peterson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Furman University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Career Readiness and Curricular Integration<br></h3>Given public skepticism of the value of college as career preparation, how can institutions ensure that students benefit from their distinctive educational missions while also gaining the skills and attitudes necessary for professional success? Two academic leaders from quite different institutions will share how they integrate career readiness training across a range of programs to ensure that students make a smooth transition into valuable work opportunities and successful career trajectories.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Sandra Dunbar-Smalley</em></strong>, Provost, AdventHealth University<br><strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Current Legal Issues in Higher Education</h3>It is critical, especially in the current regulatory and political environment, for senior campus leaders to be up-to-date in their understanding of key legal issues in higher education. An experienced higher education attorney will offer an update on the most important legal issues likely to affect independent colleges and universities in the near future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Managing Attorney, Novus Law Firm, Inc.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Expanding Esports at Independent Colleges</h3>CIC’s report <cite>Esports and Independent Colleges</cite> (2020) found that five out of six CIC member institutions had recently established some forms of esports on campus. Many colleges and universities are finding that the rapid expansion of esports programs, meant to attract and engage students, can lead to internal growing pains in the context of a dynamic external environment. What are the strategic issues that college leaders should consider as they initiate and expand esports programs? Leaders from institutions that have developed successful initiatives will outline promising approaches and describe challenges they faced as they launched or developed esports programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Davida H. Haywood</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<br><strong><em>Karen D. Morgan</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<strong><br><em>Tiffany Sanchez</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Stevenson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Free College Future?</h3>The “free college” movement has gained momentum over the past few years and President Biden is under pressure to act. The latest proposal is to provide all students with tuition benefits for community colleges in their home states. To date, several states have already implemented similar programs; several of these approaches were studied in CIC’s <cite>State “Free College” Programs: Implications for States and Independent Higher Education and Alternative Policy Approaches</cite> (2020). In this moderated conversation, CAOs from states that have already experimented with free college will share their experiences. They will discuss how state-level changes affected their institutions in order to help session participants anticipate the potential impact of a nationwide “free college” plan. Participants will share ideas about how an institution might thrive in a “free college” future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy Berner</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Provost, Sewanee: The University of the South<br><strong><em>Junius J. Gonzales</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, New York Institute of Technology<br><strong><em>Gregor Thuswaldner</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3> Innovative Strategies for First-Generation Student Success</h3>First-generation college students are encountering new challenges as campuses re-open after a year of remote learning, finding it more difficult to become accustomed to the routine of college life and acclimate to the anxieties of institutional culture. Senior administrators from institutions with innovative strategies to help students overcome these obstacles will share their approaches and lead a discussion of similarly successful efforts at other CIC member colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Keri Alioto</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Amy Badal</em></strong>, The Fritz Family Dean of Students, Bucknell University<br><strong><em>Karen Friedlen</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak</em></strong>, Provost, Bucknell University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Leveraging Consortial Collaboration: The Perspective of Association Leaders</h3>With accelerating change across higher education, inter-institutional collaboration is more important than ever. In this session, leaders of consortial organizations will explore the implications of a variety of models and initiatives for chief academic, student affairs, and diversity officers. They will highlight strategies for building a culture of collaboration both across—and within— institutions. Participants will develop and share ways they can further leverage the various consortia to which their institutions belong to increase the institutional benefits of inter-institutional collaboration.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities<br><strong><em>Stephanie L. Fabritius</em></strong>, President, Associated Colleges of the South<br><strong><em>Michael E. Hodge</em></strong>, Interim Executive Director, Atlanta University Center Consortium<br><strong><em>Michael A. (Mickey) McDonald</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Maximizing Student Achievement and Retention</h3>Initiatives to enhance student academic achievement and personal development are important points of collaboration between academic and student affairs divisions. What strategies effectively maximize the persistence to graduation, academic success, and personal growth of students? Through intentional cooperation and innovative student support models, campuses can implement a comprehensive program to promote student success. Academic and student development officers from two institutions will share approaches that have boosted both student achievement and retention on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Katherine Clay Bassard</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Michael W. Markowitz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Sherry L. Turner</em></strong>, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Abigail T. Wernicki</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Meghan Harte Weyant</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Rhodes College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Open Mic for Chief Academic, Student Affairs, and Diversity Officers</h3> <em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs, CSAOs, and CDOs.)</em><br>Participants will have the opportunity to seek practical advice from colleagues on pressing issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in independent higher education.<br> <blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University, and Chair, CIC CAO-CSAO Task Force<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><div><h3>Promoting Anti-Racism on Campus</h3>In light of goals for greater educational equity and social justice for students of color, campuses have stepped up efforts to incorporate anti-racism into their curricular and co-curricular offerings. Effective strategies are emerging: Some institutions have developed new organizational structures and created new initiatives to attain greater equity in learning outcomes and a more inclusive environment for students and employees. Leadership teams from two innovative institutions will describe their approaches to promoting anti-racism on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jennifer Bonds-Raacke</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>Leanna Fenneberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>John W. Miller Jr.</em></strong>, Dean of Curriculum and Senior Diversity Officer, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Promoting Students’ Civic Engagement</h3>New research by plenary speaker Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that key elements of civic engagement tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success. How are colleges and universities promoting and supporting civic engagement through both the curriculum and co-curricular programming? Following Hoyt’s plenary address, two pairs of senior leaders will discuss how their campuses encourage civic engagement.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Heather M. Black</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Ryan Flynn</em></strong>, Director of Community-Engaged Learning, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University<br></blockquote> <br> </div><h3>Recent and Anticipated Changes to Title IX</h3>Title IX requirements have undergone revisions in recent years, creating the need to adjust administrative practices at independent colleges and universities. What are the most important changes to guidelines and requirements that institutions need to be aware of in the current regulatory environment? What practices and campus policies are best suited to an equitable process? An experienced higher education attorney will provide timely and practical advice on Title IX compliance and risk management.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Member, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC</blockquote> <br> <div></div><div><h3>Strategic Academic Review and Realignment: An Iterative Process</h3>What do students need now for a 21st- century education? And what programs will attract students to your institution? Changing student demographics, emerging enrollment trends, and increasing societal expectations for direct outcomes-based learning lead many campuses to engage in academic restructuring and innovative program realignment. What is the right way to pace and structure these important but charged changes? Three chief academic officers will present case studies of the processes their institutions used to prioritize and restructure programs, the obstacles they faced, the results they achieved, and the strategies they employed to maintain campus morale. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss their own campus situations and to seek advice about how to gain support for necessary changes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Mary H. Van Brunt</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gwynedd Mercy University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategies for Difficult Campus Conversations</h3>Important and sensitive communication among institutional constituencies about the need for greater racial and gender justice became even more challenging under pandemic campus protocols. How can campus leaders address the sense of an urgent need for action on issues of social justice while managing external relations and helping reduce the trauma students and employees feel after a difficult year? Campus leaders will describe how their institutions have approached difficult conversations and offer lessons learned during the pandemic year.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Yolanda Barbier Gibson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Cameron J. McCoy</em></strong>, Provost, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Ryan Sandefer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica<br><strong><em>Linda Strong-Leek</em></strong>, Provost, Haverford College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Student Mental Health</h3>Mental health plays a critical role in student success, and supporting mental well-being is an important area of collaboration for academic and student affairs professionals. Stresses related to a pandemic, social unrest, and economic turmoil intensified student mental health issues; at the same time the shift to a primarily virtual student experience posed new challenges to the identification of need and delivery of services. What effective strategies have institutions employed to reach students, to monitor their mental health, and to offer help and support? And which of these interim strategies suggest opportunities to serve students effectively in the long run? Senior administrators will lead a discussion of lessons learned and strategies for the future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Deanne W. Hurley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Kathryn M. LaFontana</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Alexander Miller</em></strong>, Vice President of Student Development, Denison University</blockquote></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions9Concurrent Session<em>(Most concurrent sessions will take place on Sunday; others are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday. Additional sessions and speakers will be added to the CIC website as they are confirmed.)</em><br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Adapting Living-Learning Communities to Post-COVID-19 Realities</h3>For more than a decade, living-learning communities have been an effective and popular student success strategy, one that CIC colleges and universities highlight as an example of integrated learning on their campuses. How are CIC institutions revisiting this popular and successful practice post-pandemic? Two teams of academic and student life officers will discuss how their living-learning community programs are evolving and what innovations are being planned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jon Dooley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marlin Nabors</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Aswani K. Volety</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Elon University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Athletics and Academics: Academic and Student Affairs as Team Sport</h3>Athletics are an important element of the student experience at many CIC institutions, and effective collaboration between academic and  student affairs professionals is key to student athletes’ academic success. Athletics departments have had to adapt in response to new public health requirements and dramatically different schedules for competition. How will these challenges shape ongoing collaboration between academic and student affairs departments? How can CAOs and CSAOs together help student athletes excel both in the classroom and on the playing field? Chief academic and student affairs officers of three CIC institutions will describe how campus colleagues have adapted and planned for future athletic and academic success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jeffrey R. Breese</em></strong>, Provost, University of Mount Union<br><strong><em>Debora D’Anna</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Brevard College<br><strong><em>William (Rusty) Kennedy</em></strong>, Vice President of Admissions and Athletics, Midway University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Authentic Community: Creating Lives of Consequence, Inquiry, and Accomplishment</h3>Through more than 1,000 interviews with 25- to 65-year-old college graduates, social psychologist Richard Detweiler gathered powerful evidence that a liberal arts education experienced in “authentic community” leads to the most positive long-term outcomes. In <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (2021) he provides the data to back up many often-repeated claims about the impact of the liberal arts on adult lives of leadership, altruism, continued learning, cultural involvement, fulfillment, and success. In conversation with provost Lauren Bowen of Juniata College, and in response to questions from session participants, Detweiler will explore the implications of his research for<br>the work of academic, student affairs, and diversity officers.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Great Lakes College Association, and author of <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (forthcoming, 2021)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building Processes to Support Underprepared Students’ Success</h3>Student success depends on supporting timely degree completion. This session will highlight a proven approach to increasing degree completion by strengthening readiness and retention at all stages of<br>a student’s undergraduate career. The CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC) has succeeded on dozens of participating campuses by increasing opportunities for students to stay on track with their academic programs or even to get ahead. Panelists will discuss how the CIC-OCSC has helped students on their campuses overcome challenges and move toward completion of their academic programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian College<br><strong><em>Jamila S. Lyn</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, Acadeum’s Center of Excellence, and Director of Specialized Programming, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3>“Calling” across the (Co-)Curriculum: Academic and Student Affairs Collaborate to Foster Vocational Exploration </h3>CIC institutions are finding new ways to help undergraduate students examine questions of meaning, purpose, and identity. One approach employs the venerable concept of “finding one’s calling” to encourage students to integrate academic study in professional and liberal arts disciplines with non- academic career preparation. In this panel, two pairs of administrative colleagues will describe how academic affairs and student affairs offices can collaborate to make vocational exploration and discernment a powerful aspect of student experience through programming for students and professional development for staff and faculty members.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Connie Carson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Furman University<br><strong><em>Michael (Mike) Hayes</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Development, Lee University<br><strong><em>Deborah Murray</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lee University<br><strong><em>Ken Peterson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Furman University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Career Readiness and Curricular Integration<br></h3>Given public skepticism of the value of college as career preparation, how can institutions ensure that students benefit from their distinctive educational missions while also gaining the skills and attitudes necessary for professional success? Two academic leaders from quite different institutions will share how they integrate career readiness training across a range of programs to ensure that students make a smooth transition into valuable work opportunities and successful career trajectories.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Sandra Dunbar-Smalley</em></strong>, Provost, AdventHealth University<br><strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Current Legal Issues in Higher Education</h3>It is critical, especially in the current regulatory and political environment, for senior campus leaders to be up-to-date in their understanding of key legal issues in higher education. An experienced higher education attorney will offer an update on the most important legal issues likely to affect independent colleges and universities in the near future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Managing Attorney, Novus Law Firm, Inc.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Expanding Esports at Independent Colleges</h3>CIC’s report <cite>Esports and Independent Colleges</cite> (2020) found that five out of six CIC member institutions had recently established some forms of esports on campus. Many colleges and universities are finding that the rapid expansion of esports programs, meant to attract and engage students, can lead to internal growing pains in the context of a dynamic external environment. What are the strategic issues that college leaders should consider as they initiate and expand esports programs? Leaders from institutions that have developed successful initiatives will outline promising approaches and describe challenges they faced as they launched or developed esports programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Davida H. Haywood</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<br><strong><em>Karen D. Morgan</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<strong><br><em>Tiffany Sanchez</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Stevenson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Free College Future?</h3>The “free college” movement has gained momentum over the past few years and President Biden is under pressure to act. The latest proposal is to provide all students with tuition benefits for community colleges in their home states. To date, several states have already implemented similar programs; several of these approaches were studied in CIC’s <cite>State “Free College” Programs: Implications for States and Independent Higher Education and Alternative Policy Approaches</cite> (2020). In this moderated conversation, CAOs from states that have already experimented with free college will share their experiences. They will discuss how state-level changes affected their institutions in order to help session participants anticipate the potential impact of a nationwide “free college” plan. Participants will share ideas about how an institution might thrive in a “free college” future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy Berner</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Provost, Sewanee: The University of the South<br><strong><em>Junius J. Gonzales</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, New York Institute of Technology<br><strong><em>Gregor Thuswaldner</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3> Innovative Strategies for First-Generation Student Success</h3>First-generation college students are encountering new challenges as campuses re-open after a year of remote learning, finding it more difficult to become accustomed to the routine of college life and acclimate to the anxieties of institutional culture. Senior administrators from institutions with innovative strategies to help students overcome these obstacles will share their approaches and lead a discussion of similarly successful efforts at other CIC member colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Keri Alioto</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Amy Badal</em></strong>, The Fritz Family Dean of Students, Bucknell University<br><strong><em>Karen Friedlen</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak</em></strong>, Provost, Bucknell University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Leveraging Consortial Collaboration: The Perspective of Association Leaders</h3>With accelerating change across higher education, inter-institutional collaboration is more important than ever. In this session, leaders of consortial organizations will explore the implications of a variety of models and initiatives for chief academic, student affairs, and diversity officers. They will highlight strategies for building a culture of collaboration both across—and within— institutions. Participants will develop and share ways they can further leverage the various consortia to which their institutions belong to increase the institutional benefits of inter-institutional collaboration.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities<br><strong><em>Stephanie L. Fabritius</em></strong>, President, Associated Colleges of the South<br><strong><em>Michael E. Hodge</em></strong>, Interim Executive Director, Atlanta University Center Consortium<br><strong><em>Michael A. (Mickey) McDonald</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Maximizing Student Achievement and Retention</h3>Initiatives to enhance student academic achievement and personal development are important points of collaboration between academic and student affairs divisions. What strategies effectively maximize the persistence to graduation, academic success, and personal growth of students? Through intentional cooperation and innovative student support models, campuses can implement a comprehensive program to promote student success. Academic and student development officers from two institutions will share approaches that have boosted both student achievement and retention on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Katherine Clay Bassard</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Michael W. Markowitz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Sherry L. Turner</em></strong>, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Abigail T. Wernicki</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Meghan Harte Weyant</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Rhodes College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Open Mic for Chief Academic, Student Affairs, and Diversity Officers</h3> <em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs, CSAOs, and CDOs.)</em><br>Participants will have the opportunity to seek practical advice from colleagues on pressing issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in independent higher education.<br> <blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University, and Chair, CIC CAO-CSAO Task Force<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><div><h3>Promoting Anti-Racism on Campus</h3>In light of goals for greater educational equity and social justice for students of color, campuses have stepped up efforts to incorporate anti-racism into their curricular and co-curricular offerings. Effective strategies are emerging: Some institutions have developed new organizational structures and created new initiatives to attain greater equity in learning outcomes and a more inclusive environment for students and employees. Leadership teams from two innovative institutions will describe their approaches to promoting anti-racism on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jennifer Bonds-Raacke</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>Leanna Fenneberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>John W. Miller Jr.</em></strong>, Dean of Curriculum and Senior Diversity Officer, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Promoting Students’ Civic Engagement</h3>New research by plenary speaker Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that key elements of civic engagement tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success. How are colleges and universities promoting and supporting civic engagement through both the curriculum and co-curricular programming? Following Hoyt’s plenary address, two pairs of senior leaders will discuss how their campuses encourage civic engagement.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Heather M. Black</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Ryan Flynn</em></strong>, Director of Community-Engaged Learning, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University<br></blockquote> <br> </div><h3>Recent and Anticipated Changes to Title IX</h3>Title IX requirements have undergone revisions in recent years, creating the need to adjust administrative practices at independent colleges and universities. What are the most important changes to guidelines and requirements that institutions need to be aware of in the current regulatory environment? What practices and campus policies are best suited to an equitable process? An experienced higher education attorney will provide timely and practical advice on Title IX compliance and risk management.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Member, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC</blockquote> <br> <div></div><div><h3>Strategic Academic Review and Realignment: An Iterative Process</h3>What do students need now for a 21st- century education? And what programs will attract students to your institution? Changing student demographics, emerging enrollment trends, and increasing societal expectations for direct outcomes-based learning lead many campuses to engage in academic restructuring and innovative program realignment. What is the right way to pace and structure these important but charged changes? Three chief academic officers will present case studies of the processes their institutions used to prioritize and restructure programs, the obstacles they faced, the results they achieved, and the strategies they employed to maintain campus morale. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss their own campus situations and to seek advice about how to gain support for necessary changes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Mary H. Van Brunt</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gwynedd Mercy University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategies for Difficult Campus Conversations</h3>Important and sensitive communication among institutional constituencies about the need for greater racial and gender justice became even more challenging under pandemic campus protocols. How can campus leaders address the sense of an urgent need for action on issues of social justice while managing external relations and helping reduce the trauma students and employees feel after a difficult year? Campus leaders will describe how their institutions have approached difficult conversations and offer lessons learned during the pandemic year.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Yolanda Barbier Gibson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Cameron J. McCoy</em></strong>, Provost, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Ryan Sandefer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica<br><strong><em>Linda Strong-Leek</em></strong>, Provost, Haverford College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Student Mental Health</h3>Mental health plays a critical role in student success, and supporting mental well-being is an important area of collaboration for academic and student affairs professionals. Stresses related to a pandemic, social unrest, and economic turmoil intensified student mental health issues; at the same time the shift to a primarily virtual student experience posed new challenges to the identification of need and delivery of services. What effective strategies have institutions employed to reach students, to monitor their mental health, and to offer help and support? And which of these interim strategies suggest opportunities to serve students effectively in the long run? Senior administrators will lead a discussion of lessons learned and strategies for the future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Deanne W. Hurley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Kathryn M. LaFontana</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Alexander Miller</em></strong>, Vice President of Student Development, Denison University</blockquote></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions73Concurrent Session<em>(Most concurrent sessions will take place on Sunday; others are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday. Additional sessions and speakers will be added to the CIC website as they are confirmed.)</em><br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Adapting Living-Learning Communities to Post-COVID-19 Realities</h3>For more than a decade, living-learning communities have been an effective and popular student success strategy, one that CIC colleges and universities highlight as an example of integrated learning on their campuses. How are CIC institutions revisiting this popular and successful practice post-pandemic? Two teams of academic and student life officers will discuss how their living-learning community programs are evolving and what innovations are being planned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jon Dooley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marlin Nabors</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Aswani K. Volety</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Elon University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Athletics and Academics: Academic and Student Affairs as Team Sport</h3>Athletics are an important element of the student experience at many CIC institutions, and effective collaboration between academic and  student affairs professionals is key to student athletes’ academic success. Athletics departments have had to adapt in response to new public health requirements and dramatically different schedules for competition. How will these challenges shape ongoing collaboration between academic and student affairs departments? How can CAOs and CSAOs together help student athletes excel both in the classroom and on the playing field? Chief academic and student affairs officers of three CIC institutions will describe how campus colleagues have adapted and planned for future athletic and academic success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jeffrey R. Breese</em></strong>, Provost, University of Mount Union<br><strong><em>Debora D’Anna</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Brevard College<br><strong><em>William (Rusty) Kennedy</em></strong>, Vice President of Admissions and Athletics, Midway University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Authentic Community: Creating Lives of Consequence, Inquiry, and Accomplishment</h3>Through more than 1,000 interviews with 25- to 65-year-old college graduates, social psychologist Richard Detweiler gathered powerful evidence that a liberal arts education experienced in “authentic community” leads to the most positive long-term outcomes. In <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (2021) he provides the data to back up many often-repeated claims about the impact of the liberal arts on adult lives of leadership, altruism, continued learning, cultural involvement, fulfillment, and success. In conversation with provost Lauren Bowen of Juniata College, and in response to questions from session participants, Detweiler will explore the implications of his research for<br>the work of academic, student affairs, and diversity officers.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Great Lakes College Association, and author of <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (forthcoming, 2021)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building Processes to Support Underprepared Students’ Success</h3>Student success depends on supporting timely degree completion. This session will highlight a proven approach to increasing degree completion by strengthening readiness and retention at all stages of<br>a student’s undergraduate career. The CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC) has succeeded on dozens of participating campuses by increasing opportunities for students to stay on track with their academic programs or even to get ahead. Panelists will discuss how the CIC-OCSC has helped students on their campuses overcome challenges and move toward completion of their academic programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian College<br><strong><em>Jamila S. Lyn</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, Acadeum’s Center of Excellence, and Director of Specialized Programming, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3>“Calling” across the (Co-)Curriculum: Academic and Student Affairs Collaborate to Foster Vocational Exploration </h3>CIC institutions are finding new ways to help undergraduate students examine questions of meaning, purpose, and identity. One approach employs the venerable concept of “finding one’s calling” to encourage students to integrate academic study in professional and liberal arts disciplines with non- academic career preparation. In this panel, two pairs of administrative colleagues will describe how academic affairs and student affairs offices can collaborate to make vocational exploration and discernment a powerful aspect of student experience through programming for students and professional development for staff and faculty members.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Connie Carson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Furman University<br><strong><em>Michael (Mike) Hayes</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Development, Lee University<br><strong><em>Deborah Murray</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lee University<br><strong><em>Ken Peterson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Furman University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Career Readiness and Curricular Integration<br></h3>Given public skepticism of the value of college as career preparation, how can institutions ensure that students benefit from their distinctive educational missions while also gaining the skills and attitudes necessary for professional success? Two academic leaders from quite different institutions will share how they integrate career readiness training across a range of programs to ensure that students make a smooth transition into valuable work opportunities and successful career trajectories.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Sandra Dunbar-Smalley</em></strong>, Provost, AdventHealth University<br><strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Current Legal Issues in Higher Education</h3>It is critical, especially in the current regulatory and political environment, for senior campus leaders to be up-to-date in their understanding of key legal issues in higher education. An experienced higher education attorney will offer an update on the most important legal issues likely to affect independent colleges and universities in the near future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Managing Attorney, Novus Law Firm, Inc.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Expanding Esports at Independent Colleges</h3>CIC’s report <cite>Esports and Independent Colleges</cite> (2020) found that five out of six CIC member institutions had recently established some forms of esports on campus. Many colleges and universities are finding that the rapid expansion of esports programs, meant to attract and engage students, can lead to internal growing pains in the context of a dynamic external environment. What are the strategic issues that college leaders should consider as they initiate and expand esports programs? Leaders from institutions that have developed successful initiatives will outline promising approaches and describe challenges they faced as they launched or developed esports programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Davida H. Haywood</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<br><strong><em>Karen D. Morgan</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<strong><br><em>Tiffany Sanchez</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Stevenson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Free College Future?</h3>The “free college” movement has gained momentum over the past few years and President Biden is under pressure to act. The latest proposal is to provide all students with tuition benefits for community colleges in their home states. To date, several states have already implemented similar programs; several of these approaches were studied in CIC’s <cite>State “Free College” Programs: Implications for States and Independent Higher Education and Alternative Policy Approaches</cite> (2020). In this moderated conversation, CAOs from states that have already experimented with free college will share their experiences. They will discuss how state-level changes affected their institutions in order to help session participants anticipate the potential impact of a nationwide “free college” plan. Participants will share ideas about how an institution might thrive in a “free college” future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy Berner</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Provost, Sewanee: The University of the South<br><strong><em>Junius J. Gonzales</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, New York Institute of Technology<br><strong><em>Gregor Thuswaldner</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3> Innovative Strategies for First-Generation Student Success</h3>First-generation college students are encountering new challenges as campuses re-open after a year of remote learning, finding it more difficult to become accustomed to the routine of college life and acclimate to the anxieties of institutional culture. Senior administrators from institutions with innovative strategies to help students overcome these obstacles will share their approaches and lead a discussion of similarly successful efforts at other CIC member colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Keri Alioto</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Amy Badal</em></strong>, The Fritz Family Dean of Students, Bucknell University<br><strong><em>Karen Friedlen</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak</em></strong>, Provost, Bucknell University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Leveraging Consortial Collaboration: The Perspective of Association Leaders</h3>With accelerating change across higher education, inter-institutional collaboration is more important than ever. In this session, leaders of consortial organizations will explore the implications of a variety of models and initiatives for chief academic, student affairs, and diversity officers. They will highlight strategies for building a culture of collaboration both across—and within— institutions. Participants will develop and share ways they can further leverage the various consortia to which their institutions belong to increase the institutional benefits of inter-institutional collaboration.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities<br><strong><em>Stephanie L. Fabritius</em></strong>, President, Associated Colleges of the South<br><strong><em>Michael E. Hodge</em></strong>, Interim Executive Director, Atlanta University Center Consortium<br><strong><em>Michael A. (Mickey) McDonald</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Maximizing Student Achievement and Retention</h3>Initiatives to enhance student academic achievement and personal development are important points of collaboration between academic and student affairs divisions. What strategies effectively maximize the persistence to graduation, academic success, and personal growth of students? Through intentional cooperation and innovative student support models, campuses can implement a comprehensive program to promote student success. Academic and student development officers from two institutions will share approaches that have boosted both student achievement and retention on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Katherine Clay Bassard</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Michael W. Markowitz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Sherry L. Turner</em></strong>, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Abigail T. Wernicki</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Meghan Harte Weyant</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Rhodes College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Open Mic for Chief Academic, Student Affairs, and Diversity Officers</h3> <em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs, CSAOs, and CDOs.)</em><br>Participants will have the opportunity to seek practical advice from colleagues on pressing issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in independent higher education.<br> <blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University, and Chair, CIC CAO-CSAO Task Force<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><div><h3>Promoting Anti-Racism on Campus</h3>In light of goals for greater educational equity and social justice for students of color, campuses have stepped up efforts to incorporate anti-racism into their curricular and co-curricular offerings. Effective strategies are emerging: Some institutions have developed new organizational structures and created new initiatives to attain greater equity in learning outcomes and a more inclusive environment for students and employees. Leadership teams from two innovative institutions will describe their approaches to promoting anti-racism on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jennifer Bonds-Raacke</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>Leanna Fenneberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>John W. Miller Jr.</em></strong>, Dean of Curriculum and Senior Diversity Officer, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Promoting Students’ Civic Engagement</h3>New research by plenary speaker Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that key elements of civic engagement tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success. How are colleges and universities promoting and supporting civic engagement through both the curriculum and co-curricular programming? Following Hoyt’s plenary address, two pairs of senior leaders will discuss how their campuses encourage civic engagement.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Heather M. Black</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Ryan Flynn</em></strong>, Director of Community-Engaged Learning, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University<br></blockquote> <br> </div><h3>Recent and Anticipated Changes to Title IX</h3>Title IX requirements have undergone revisions in recent years, creating the need to adjust administrative practices at independent colleges and universities. What are the most important changes to guidelines and requirements that institutions need to be aware of in the current regulatory environment? What practices and campus policies are best suited to an equitable process? An experienced higher education attorney will provide timely and practical advice on Title IX compliance and risk management.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Member, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC</blockquote> <br> <div></div><div><h3>Strategic Academic Review and Realignment: An Iterative Process</h3>What do students need now for a 21st- century education? And what programs will attract students to your institution? Changing student demographics, emerging enrollment trends, and increasing societal expectations for direct outcomes-based learning lead many campuses to engage in academic restructuring and innovative program realignment. What is the right way to pace and structure these important but charged changes? Three chief academic officers will present case studies of the processes their institutions used to prioritize and restructure programs, the obstacles they faced, the results they achieved, and the strategies they employed to maintain campus morale. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss their own campus situations and to seek advice about how to gain support for necessary changes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Mary H. Van Brunt</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gwynedd Mercy University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategies for Difficult Campus Conversations</h3>Important and sensitive communication among institutional constituencies about the need for greater racial and gender justice became even more challenging under pandemic campus protocols. How can campus leaders address the sense of an urgent need for action on issues of social justice while managing external relations and helping reduce the trauma students and employees feel after a difficult year? Campus leaders will describe how their institutions have approached difficult conversations and offer lessons learned during the pandemic year.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Yolanda Barbier Gibson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Cameron J. McCoy</em></strong>, Provost, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Ryan Sandefer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica<br><strong><em>Linda Strong-Leek</em></strong>, Provost, Haverford College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Student Mental Health</h3>Mental health plays a critical role in student success, and supporting mental well-being is an important area of collaboration for academic and student affairs professionals. Stresses related to a pandemic, social unrest, and economic turmoil intensified student mental health issues; at the same time the shift to a primarily virtual student experience posed new challenges to the identification of need and delivery of services. What effective strategies have institutions employed to reach students, to monitor their mental health, and to offer help and support? And which of these interim strategies suggest opportunities to serve students effectively in the long run? Senior administrators will lead a discussion of lessons learned and strategies for the future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Deanne W. Hurley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Kathryn M. LaFontana</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Alexander Miller</em></strong>, Vice President of Student Development, Denison University</blockquote></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions18Concurrent Session<em>(Most concurrent sessions will take place on Sunday; others are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday. Additional sessions and speakers will be added to the CIC website as they are confirmed.)</em><br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Adapting Living-Learning Communities to Post-COVID-19 Realities</h3>For more than a decade, living-learning communities have been an effective and popular student success strategy, one that CIC colleges and universities highlight as an example of integrated learning on their campuses. How are CIC institutions revisiting this popular and successful practice post-pandemic? Two teams of academic and student life officers will discuss how their living-learning community programs are evolving and what innovations are being planned.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jon Dooley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marlin Nabors</em></strong>, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost, Endicott College<br><strong><em>Aswani K. Volety</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Elon University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Athletics and Academics: Academic and Student Affairs as Team Sport</h3>Athletics are an important element of the student experience at many CIC institutions, and effective collaboration between academic and  student affairs professionals is key to student athletes’ academic success. Athletics departments have had to adapt in response to new public health requirements and dramatically different schedules for competition. How will these challenges shape ongoing collaboration between academic and student affairs departments? How can CAOs and CSAOs together help student athletes excel both in the classroom and on the playing field? Chief academic and student affairs officers of three CIC institutions will describe how campus colleagues have adapted and planned for future athletic and academic success.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jeffrey R. Breese</em></strong>, Provost, University of Mount Union<br><strong><em>Debora D’Anna</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Brevard College<br><strong><em>William (Rusty) Kennedy</em></strong>, Vice President of Admissions and Athletics, Midway University<br></blockquote>  <h3>Authentic Community: Creating Lives of Consequence, Inquiry, and Accomplishment</h3>Through more than 1,000 interviews with 25- to 65-year-old college graduates, social psychologist Richard Detweiler gathered powerful evidence that a liberal arts education experienced in “authentic community” leads to the most positive long-term outcomes. In <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (2021) he provides the data to back up many often-repeated claims about the impact of the liberal arts on adult lives of leadership, altruism, continued learning, cultural involvement, fulfillment, and success. In conversation with provost Lauren Bowen of Juniata College, and in response to questions from session participants, Detweiler will explore the implications of his research for<br>the work of academic, student affairs, and diversity officers.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, Provost, Juniata College<br><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Great Lakes College Association, and author of <cite>The Evidence Liberal Arts Needs</cite> (forthcoming, 2021)<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Building Processes to Support Underprepared Students’ Success</h3>Student success depends on supporting timely degree completion. This session will highlight a proven approach to increasing degree completion by strengthening readiness and retention at all stages of<br>a student’s undergraduate career. The CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC) has succeeded on dozens of participating campuses by increasing opportunities for students to stay on track with their academic programs or even to get ahead. Panelists will discuss how the CIC-OCSC has helped students on their campuses overcome challenges and move toward completion of their academic programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Moravian College<br><strong><em>Jamila S. Lyn</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, Acadeum’s Center of Excellence, and Director of Specialized Programming, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3>“Calling” across the (Co-)Curriculum: Academic and Student Affairs Collaborate to Foster Vocational Exploration </h3>CIC institutions are finding new ways to help undergraduate students examine questions of meaning, purpose, and identity. One approach employs the venerable concept of “finding one’s calling” to encourage students to integrate academic study in professional and liberal arts disciplines with non- academic career preparation. In this panel, two pairs of administrative colleagues will describe how academic affairs and student affairs offices can collaborate to make vocational exploration and discernment a powerful aspect of student experience through programming for students and professional development for staff and faculty members.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Connie Carson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Furman University<br><strong><em>Michael (Mike) Hayes</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Development, Lee University<br><strong><em>Deborah Murray</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lee University<br><strong><em>Ken Peterson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Furman University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Career Readiness and Curricular Integration<br></h3>Given public skepticism of the value of college as career preparation, how can institutions ensure that students benefit from their distinctive educational missions while also gaining the skills and attitudes necessary for professional success? Two academic leaders from quite different institutions will share how they integrate career readiness training across a range of programs to ensure that students make a smooth transition into valuable work opportunities and successful career trajectories.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Sandra Dunbar-Smalley</em></strong>, Provost, AdventHealth University<br><strong><em>Nancy J. Evangelista</em></strong>, Provost, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Current Legal Issues in Higher Education</h3>It is critical, especially in the current regulatory and political environment, for senior campus leaders to be up-to-date in their understanding of key legal issues in higher education. An experienced higher education attorney will offer an update on the most important legal issues likely to affect independent colleges and universities in the near future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Managing Attorney, Novus Law Firm, Inc.<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Expanding Esports at Independent Colleges</h3>CIC’s report <cite>Esports and Independent Colleges</cite> (2020) found that five out of six CIC member institutions had recently established some forms of esports on campus. Many colleges and universities are finding that the rapid expansion of esports programs, meant to attract and engage students, can lead to internal growing pains in the context of a dynamic external environment. What are the strategic issues that college leaders should consider as they initiate and expand esports programs? Leaders from institutions that have developed successful initiatives will outline promising approaches and describe challenges they faced as they launched or developed esports programs.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Davida H. Haywood</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<br><strong><em>Karen D. Morgan</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Johnson C. Smith University<strong><br><em>Tiffany Sanchez</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Stevenson University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Free College Future?</h3>The “free college” movement has gained momentum over the past few years and President Biden is under pressure to act. The latest proposal is to provide all students with tuition benefits for community colleges in their home states. To date, several states have already implemented similar programs; several of these approaches were studied in CIC’s <cite>State “Free College” Programs: Implications for States and Independent Higher Education and Alternative Policy Approaches</cite> (2020). In this moderated conversation, CAOs from states that have already experimented with free college will share their experiences. They will discuss how state-level changes affected their institutions in order to help session participants anticipate the potential impact of a nationwide “free college” plan. Participants will share ideas about how an institution might thrive in a “free college” future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Nancy Berner</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Provost, Sewanee: The University of the South<br><strong><em>Junius J. Gonzales</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, New York Institute of Technology<br><strong><em>Gregor Thuswaldner</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3> Innovative Strategies for First-Generation Student Success</h3>First-generation college students are encountering new challenges as campuses re-open after a year of remote learning, finding it more difficult to become accustomed to the routine of college life and acclimate to the anxieties of institutional culture. Senior administrators from institutions with innovative strategies to help students overcome these obstacles will share their approaches and lead a discussion of similarly successful efforts at other CIC member colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Keri Alioto</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Amy Badal</em></strong>, The Fritz Family Dean of Students, Bucknell University<br><strong><em>Karen Friedlen</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Mary University (WI)<br><strong><em>Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak</em></strong>, Provost, Bucknell University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Leveraging Consortial Collaboration: The Perspective of Association Leaders</h3>With accelerating change across higher education, inter-institutional collaboration is more important than ever. In this session, leaders of consortial organizations will explore the implications of a variety of models and initiatives for chief academic, student affairs, and diversity officers. They will highlight strategies for building a culture of collaboration both across—and within— institutions. Participants will develop and share ways they can further leverage the various consortia to which their institutions belong to increase the institutional benefits of inter-institutional collaboration.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities<br><strong><em>Stephanie L. Fabritius</em></strong>, President, Associated Colleges of the South<br><strong><em>Michael E. Hodge</em></strong>, Interim Executive Director, Atlanta University Center Consortium<br><strong><em>Michael A. (Mickey) McDonald</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Maximizing Student Achievement and Retention</h3>Initiatives to enhance student academic achievement and personal development are important points of collaboration between academic and student affairs divisions. What strategies effectively maximize the persistence to graduation, academic success, and personal growth of students? Through intentional cooperation and innovative student support models, campuses can implement a comprehensive program to promote student success. Academic and student development officers from two institutions will share approaches that have boosted both student achievement and retention on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Katherine Clay Bassard</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Michael W. Markowitz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Sherry L. Turner</em></strong>, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer, Rhodes College<br><strong><em>Abigail T. Wernicki</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Holy Family University<br><strong><em>Meghan Harte Weyant</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Life, Rhodes College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Open Mic for Chief Academic, Student Affairs, and Diversity Officers</h3> <em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs, CSAOs, and CDOs.)</em><br>Participants will have the opportunity to seek practical advice from colleagues on pressing issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in independent higher education.<br> <blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Aurora University, and Chair, CIC CAO-CSAO Task Force<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><div><h3>Promoting Anti-Racism on Campus</h3>In light of goals for greater educational equity and social justice for students of color, campuses have stepped up efforts to incorporate anti-racism into their curricular and co-curricular offerings. Effective strategies are emerging: Some institutions have developed new organizational structures and created new initiatives to attain greater equity in learning outcomes and a more inclusive environment for students and employees. Leadership teams from two innovative institutions will describe their approaches to promoting anti-racism on their campuses.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Jennifer Bonds-Raacke</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>Leanna Fenneberg</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University<br><strong><em>John W. Miller Jr.</em></strong>, Dean of Curriculum and Senior Diversity Officer, St. Norbert College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Promoting Students’ Civic Engagement</h3>New research by plenary speaker Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that key elements of civic engagement tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success. How are colleges and universities promoting and supporting civic engagement through both the curriculum and co-curricular programming? Following Hoyt’s plenary address, two pairs of senior leaders will discuss how their campuses encourage civic engagement.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Heather M. Black</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Ryan Flynn</em></strong>, Director of Community-Engaged Learning, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College<br><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University<br></blockquote> <br> </div><h3>Recent and Anticipated Changes to Title IX</h3>Title IX requirements have undergone revisions in recent years, creating the need to adjust administrative practices at independent colleges and universities. What are the most important changes to guidelines and requirements that institutions need to be aware of in the current regulatory environment? What practices and campus policies are best suited to an equitable process? An experienced higher education attorney will provide timely and practical advice on Title IX compliance and risk management.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Member, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC</blockquote> <br> <div></div><div><h3>Strategic Academic Review and Realignment: An Iterative Process</h3>What do students need now for a 21st- century education? And what programs will attract students to your institution? Changing student demographics, emerging enrollment trends, and increasing societal expectations for direct outcomes-based learning lead many campuses to engage in academic restructuring and innovative program realignment. What is the right way to pace and structure these important but charged changes? Three chief academic officers will present case studies of the processes their institutions used to prioritize and restructure programs, the obstacles they faced, the results they achieved, and the strategies they employed to maintain campus morale. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss their own campus situations and to seek advice about how to gain support for necessary changes.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Allegheny College<br><strong><em>Karlyn Crowley</em></strong>, Provost, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Mary H. Van Brunt</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gwynedd Mercy University<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Strategies for Difficult Campus Conversations</h3>Important and sensitive communication among institutional constituencies about the need for greater racial and gender justice became even more challenging under pandemic campus protocols. How can campus leaders address the sense of an urgent need for action on issues of social justice while managing external relations and helping reduce the trauma students and employees feel after a difficult year? Campus leaders will describe how their institutions have approached difficult conversations and offer lessons learned during the pandemic year.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Yolanda Barbier Gibson</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Cameron J. McCoy</em></strong>, Provost, Shenandoah University<br><strong><em>Ryan Sandefer</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of St. Scholastica<br><strong><em>Linda Strong-Leek</em></strong>, Provost, Haverford College<br></blockquote> <br> <h3>Student Mental Health</h3>Mental health plays a critical role in student success, and supporting mental well-being is an important area of collaboration for academic and student affairs professionals. Stresses related to a pandemic, social unrest, and economic turmoil intensified student mental health issues; at the same time the shift to a primarily virtual student experience posed new challenges to the identification of need and delivery of services. What effective strategies have institutions employed to reach students, to monitor their mental health, and to offer help and support? And which of these interim strategies suggest opportunities to serve students effectively in the long run? Senior administrators will lead a discussion of lessons learned and strategies for the future.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Deanne W. Hurley</em></strong>, Vice President for Student Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Kathryn M. LaFontana</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Ursuline College<br><strong><em>Alexander Miller</em></strong>, Vice President of Student Development, Denison University</blockquote></div>
Free Time for DinnerFree Time for Dinner16Spouses and Partners
Free Time for DinnerFree Time for Dinner91
Lunch on Your OwnLunch on Your Own92
Luncheon and Discussion Groups for Women AdministratorsLuncheon and Discussion Groups for Women Administrators83Women chief academic officers, student affairs officers, diversity officers, and other administrators are invited to join discussion groups on current issues led by colleagues who have been selected for their expertise.<br><br><h3>If Not Me, Then Who?</h3><strong><em>Susan M. Donovan</em></strong> has served as president of Bellarmine University in Kentucky since 2017. Previously, she served for 32 years at Loyola University Maryland including as dean of residence life, chief student development officer, executive vice president, and interim president. At Bellarmine, Donovan’s early initiatives included the launch of a strategic plan that focuses on student success, inclusion, and academic innovation and efforts to increase institutional transparency and strengthen shared governance. She serves on the boards of the Muhammad Ali Center, a nonprofit museum and cultural center dedicated to the life and legacy of Muhammad Ali, and Impetus, a business-led coalition of Louisville leaders focused on improving education and public safety in the city, among other things. Donovan earned her PhD in higher education from St. Louis University, a master’s degree in higher education from Florida State University, and a BA in communications from Buena Vista University.<br><br><em>Fee: early rate $65 (by September 3); regular rate $80 (after September 3)</em><br><br><em>Note: This event requires pre-registration, as space is limited.</em>
Luncheon for Members of the CIC Online Course Sharing ConsortiumLuncheon for Members of the CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium88Representatives of institutions that are members of the CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium are invited to gather for lunch to learn about the growth of the Consortium and to share institutional strategies to support student progress.<br><blockquote>Conveners: <strong><em>Carol M. Schuler</em></strong>, Vice President for State Council Programs and the Online Course Sharing Consortium, and <strong><em>Robert Manzer</em></strong>, Chief Academic Officer, Acadeum</blockquote>
Networking Break with SponsorsNetworking Break with Sponsors12
Networking Break with SponsorsNetworking Break with Sponsors6
Networking Break with SponsorsNetworking Break with Sponsors19
Plenary Session: Jillian KinziePlenary Session: Jillian Kinzie11Jillian KinziePlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>​Promoting Equity and Quality in Student Engagement and Success</h3><p><br>The twin goals of quality and equity are the foundation for excellence in undergraduate education and must be addressed directly to help all students thrive in college, complete their degrees, and attain fulfilling careers. The best education that colleges can design is one in which more students are engaged at high levels in practices that matter for their development and learning, including collaborative learning, effective advising, engagement across difference, and high-impact practices (HIPs). It is also one in which students have a healthy sense of belonging and feel supported in their educational journeys. Yet, evidence shows that inequities exist in these dimensions, particularly for traditionally underserved students. What should colleges and universities focus on to achieve student success for all?<br><br>Jillian Kinzie, associate director of the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research and National Survey of Student Engagement, will draw on foundational results from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), as well as new evidence about advising, sense of belonging, and career and workplace preparation, to explore the importance of HIPs for racial identity groups and to encourage data-informed strategies and greater connection between data and action. She will discuss the effective use of student engagement data to design experiences in and out of the classroom for increased equity and to improve educational quality for all students.<br></p>
Plenary Session: Lindsay Till HoytPlenary Session: Lindsay Till Hoyt46Lindsay Till HoytPlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>​Civic Engagement and Student Well-being</h3><p> <br>Mental health is fundamental to student achievement and academic success. Support for student mental health is important at the best of times, and especially so when recent events—a divisive presidential election, graphic depictions of police brutality, a global pandemic, and prolonged isolation—have traumatized affected populations, contributed to general anxiety, and negatively influenced student achievement. Intentional mental health support can help all students maintain their academic progress and personal development. New research by Lindsay Till Hoyt has found that volunteering, voting, and activism—key elements of civic engagement—tend to be positively related to mental well-being and student success, with some important nuances. A noted scholar and researcher who studies the social determinants of health, Hoyt will share recent findings and discuss how they can help campus leaders create thriving communities of learning that simultaneously support students’ mental well-being and prepare them for active and meaningful civic engagement.<br></p>
Reception for Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy ProgramsReception for Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy Programs84Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy are invited to gather for light refreshments and conversation.<br><br>Convener: <strong><em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, AALI
Reception for NetVUE MembersReception for NetVUE Members84Representatives of institutions that are members of CIC’s Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) are invited to learn about recent NetVUE activities and to share lessons learned from their campus programs with colleagues over refreshments.<br><blockquote>Conveners:<br><strong><em>David S. Cunningham</em></strong>, Director of NetVUE, CIC<br><strong><em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, CIC</blockquote>
Senior Leadership AcademySenior Leadership Academy89Workshop<em>(by invitation)</em><br><strong></strong><br>The opening seminar for the 2021–2022 cohort of CIC’s Senior Leadership Academy (SLA) will precede and overlap with the Institute. SLA participants are welcome to participate in the remainder of the Institute at a reduced registration fee.<br><br>SLA is a yearlong professional development program for mid-level administrators in any division of a CIC member institution who aspire to senior leadership positions in independent colleges or universities. SLA is offered jointly by CIC and the American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI).<br> <blockquote>Director: <strong> <em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI<br></blockquote> <em>Note: For information about the nomination process for the 2022–2023 SLA cohort, please participate in the Senior Leadership Academy breakfast discussion or <a href="/_layouts/15/FIXUPREDIRECT.ASPX?WebId=8c30f580-60d3-4f8a-b075-8a20a7c4db97&TermSetId=16f73877-6b23-4372-84ca-28979b493fa8&TermId=d527599e-0f0f-416b-a187-9ae704719904" target="_blank" aria-label="Opens in new window">visit the SLA program page</a>.</em>
Senior Leadership AcademySenior Leadership Academy90Workshop<em>(by invitation)</em><br><strong></strong><br>The opening seminar for the 2021–2022 cohort of CIC’s Senior Leadership Academy (SLA) will precede and overlap with the Institute. SLA participants are welcome to participate in the remainder of the Institute at a reduced registration fee.<br><br>SLA is a yearlong professional development program for mid-level administrators in any division of a CIC member institution who aspire to senior leadership positions in independent colleges or universities. SLA is offered jointly by CIC and the American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI).<br> <blockquote>Director: <strong> <em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI<br></blockquote> <em>Note: For information about the nomination process for the 2022–2023 SLA cohort, please participate in the Senior Leadership Academy breakfast discussion or <a href="/_layouts/15/FIXUPREDIRECT.ASPX?WebId=8c30f580-60d3-4f8a-b075-8a20a7c4db97&TermSetId=16f73877-6b23-4372-84ca-28979b493fa8&TermId=d527599e-0f0f-416b-a187-9ae704719904" target="_blank" aria-label="Opens in new window">visit the SLA program page</a>.</em>
Sponsor Showcase DiscussionsSponsor Showcase Discussions87<p>​Participants will gather to discuss issues raised by sponsor showcase sessions—short, pre-recorded videos that will be available on the conference app.</p>
Strengthening Humanities for a New MajorityStrengthening Humanities for a New Majority5Sarah Fatherly; Aaron J. Kuecker; Sean P. O’ConnellConcurrent SessionThis session will engage and develop the themes of the opening plenary, “Revitalizing the Humanities for Social Justice and Civic Engagement.” Three chief academic officers, all distinguished humanists, will share their perspectives on how to revive broad student interest in humanistic learning. Sarah Fatherly will discuss how initiatives in the digital humanities, including digital portfolios and community-based research, give the humanities fresh relevance in the eyes of both students and the public. In her view, digital innovation and public engagement are central to a vital future for the humanities. Aaron J. Kuecker will discuss how the study of the humanities can co-exist with, and even support, a campus religious tradition or affiliation. Using the concept of “vocation,” Kuecker will show how the humanities, religious tradition, and career preparation can be interwoven to help students plan their futures. Sean P. O’Connell will describe how the humanities play a central role in creating personalized, interdisciplinary majors and provide the impetus for successful master’s degree programs by embracing new modes of experiential learning and framing the core axioms of humanistic study in new contexts.<br><blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>S. Georgia Nugent</em></strong>, President, Illinois Wesleyan University and former President, Society for Classical Studies</blockquote>
Welcome Reception and DinnerWelcome Reception and Dinner3Spouses and Partners<p>​Immediately following the keynote address, a combination reception and dinner will provide participants the opportunity to greet old friends and meet new colleagues.</p>
Welcome and Keynote: Dan-el Padilla PeraltaWelcome and Keynote: Dan-el Padilla Peralta2Dan-el Padilla PeraltaPlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>​Revitalizing the Humanities for Social Justice and Civic Engagement</h3><p> <br>Dan-el Padilla Peralta’s trajectory from childhood as an undocumented immigrant in New York City to a professorship in classics at a major research university demonstrates the dynamic power of a liberal arts education. A much-published professor of classics, his views on how to revitalize the humanities have sparked both academic and popular discussion and spurred debate about how classic texts and humanistic learning can best engage the full range of today’s students, preparing them for lives and careers in the years to come. He argues that to reverse a decades-long decline in enrollments, programs in the humanities should focus on pressing problems such as xenophobia and racism and on promoting social justice and civic engagement. This keynote address, offered in the spirit of critical reform that is itself an essential legacy of the liberal arts, will take a deep dive into one core humanistic field—classics—to offer insights of interest to all academic, student life, and diversity officers who work to keep these foundational disciplines strong and vital on their campuses.</p>
Workshop for CAOs in Their Third or Fourth Year of ServiceWorkshop for CAOs in Their Third or Fourth Year of Service1Workshop<div> <em>Workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. The registration fee covers materials, meals, and refreshments. To add a workshop to an existing Institute registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at </em> <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.nche.edu"> <em>ttruscott@cic.nche.edu</em></a><em>.</em><br></div><br>Entering the third or fourth year of service, chief academic officers usually have mastered the fundamentals of the role. At this stage, CAOs discover greater opportunities to lead rather than just manage. What are the key questions CAOs can and should address at this stage in their careers? For example, how do CAOs balance attention to their institutions’ immediate issues with focus on their long-term academic needs? How can CAOs attend to their own professional lives while also serving their institutions? How do CAOs work effectively with presidents and other cabinet officers on strategic planning? Participants will explore these and related questions and gain fresh perspectives on the next stage in their careers as CAOs.<br> <blockquote>Workshop Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Kimberly A. Coplin</em></strong>, Provost, Denison University<br><strong><em>Michael J. Sosulski</em></strong>, Provost, Wofford College <br></blockquote> <br> <em>Fee: early rate $75 (by September 3); regular fee $100 (after September 3)</em>
Workshop for New Chief Academic OfficersWorkshop for New Chief Academic Officers1Workshop<div> <em>Workshops require pre-registration as space is limited. The registration fee covers materials, meals, and refreshments. To add a workshop to an existing Institute registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at </em> <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.nche.edu"> <em>ttruscott@cic.nche.edu</em></a><em>.</em><br></div><div> <br> </div><div>Chief academic officers who have served for fewer than two years are invited<br>to participate in this workshop, led by experienced colleagues, that addresses issues that newer CAOs often face. Participants will work in small groups, analyze case studies, and discuss such topics as accreditation; assessment and institutional effectiveness; faculty governance and leadership; appointments, promotion, and tenure and its alternatives; managing time, technology, and paper; and working with peer administrators. Participants will be paired with an experienced CAO mentor.<br></div><blockquote>Workshop Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Kerry D. Fulcher</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Point Loma Nazarene University<br><strong><em>Lori Werth</em></strong>, Provost, University of Pikeville<br><br>Mentor Program Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Elissa Heil</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Wilson College<br><strong><em>Stephen D. Stahl</em></strong>, Provost, Baldwin Wallace University<br></blockquote> <br> <em>Fee: early rate $75 (by September 3); regular fee $100 (after September 3)</em>
WorkshopsWorkshops15Workshop<em>​These workshops are free of charge but require pre-registration as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute<br>registration, please contact Tabitha Truscott, CIC conference and program manager, at <a href="mailto:ttruscott@cic.nche.edu">ttruscott@cic.nche.edu</a>.</em><br><br> <h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">Monday, November 8, 2:00–5:00 p.m.</h3> <br> <h4>Dispute Resolution for Administrators</h4>Led by an experienced higher education attorney who has also served as an independent college president, this workshop will feature practical and accessible dispute resolution tools that can be used to identify, manage, and resolve the conflicts encountered by campus leaders, including those related to pandemic, personnel, and human resources issues.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Kathleen A. Rinehart</em></strong>, Principal, Conflict Consultants Network LLC<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>How to Design a Campus Diversity Education Plan </h4>Independent college and university leaders increasingly want to offer diversity and equity training programs for students and employees as part of their mission to promote a healthy, vibrant learning environment. Institutions strive to promote anti-racist and inclusive thinking while remaining sensitive to the distress that can be generated by focusing attention on traumatic internal or external events. This session will encourage teams of institutional colleagues to develop concrete and practical implementation plans for training campus constituencies on a range of topics under the umbrella of diversity education. <br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Donnesha A. Blake</em></strong>, Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Alma College<br><strong><em>Danyelle Gregory</em></strong>, Director of Diversity, Access, and Inclusion, Muskingum University<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>Leveraging Technology for Student Success</h4>Technology is now fundamental to how we learn, connect, communicate, and create. This became even more apparent at CIC institutions when, for many, the pandemic accelerated the move to hybrid and online learning environments. Providing equitable access to essential tools and resources is critical to the success of all students. How can institutions design and implement campus technology projects that center on student success? How can technology support diverse learning styles? What is the place for campus technology tools in the student experience outside the classroom? Two institutions that have recently worked with Apple’s education division to explore these and other questions will share their experience designing and implementing campus technology projects to create meaningful and equitable student outcomes.<br> <blockquote> <strong> <em>Paul D’Ascoli</em></strong>, Market Segment Executive, Higher Education, Apple Inc.<br><strong><em>Dominic N. Lacy</em></strong>, Chief Operating Officer, Gallaudet University<br><strong><em>Jeffrey W. Lewis</em></strong>, Interim Provost, Gallaudet University<br><strong><em>Eileen Lynd-Balta</em></strong>, Associate Provost, St. John Fisher College<br><strong><em>Kevin Railey</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. John Fisher College<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>The Future of Work in Higher Education </h4>Organizations of all kinds responded quickly to the health and risk management needs of the pandemic workplace. By adopting new job schedules, workplace conditions, and modes of work, colleges and universities demonstrated that they have the flexibility to design the higher education jobs and workplaces of the future. This workshop will outline research undertaken by TIAA that provides the impetus for thinking about distributed and decentralized work arrangements for faculty and staff members. Two academic leaders of CIC institutions will share the ways their campuses have adapted to remote work expectations while maintaining vibrant learning communities. Participants will have the opportunity to develop action plans to adapt their campus workplace to post-pandemic higher education realities.<br> <blockquote><strong><em>Jocelyn B. Caldwell</em></strong>, Vice President, Talent Acquisition and Workforce Strategies, TIAA<br><strong><em>Vanya Quiñones</em></strong>, Provost, Pace University<br><strong><em>Marci Sortor</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, St. Olaf College<br><strong><em>Anup Vidwans</em></strong>, Senior Managing Director, Strategic Relationships, TIAA</blockquote>