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Concurrent Sessions (including lunch)Concurrent Sessions (including lunch)48Concurrent Session(Boxed lunches will be available.)<br> <div> <br> </div><div><h3>Contending with Controversies: A Presidential Conversation</h3>With the intensity of issues and emotions on and off campus and the velocity of social media, presidents increasingly are faced with controversies that commandeer their agenda and may threaten their presidency. How do presidents prepare themselves and their boards, cabinets, and campuses? What principles or protocols might support them when there is no decision they can make that will please or even appease all? This conversation will help further presidents’ thinking about their own circumstances and leadership.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Judith Block McLaughlin</em></strong>, Director, Higher Education Program; Educational Chair, Harvard Seminar for New Presidents; and Senior Lecturer, Harvard University<br></blockquote></div><div><h3><br>Helping Students Explore Their Vocations and Find Their Callings: The President’s Role</h3>Many CIC institutions encourage students to explore questions of meaning, purpose, and vocation as a way of reflecting critically on their programs of study, career aspirations, and future directions in life. These pursuits, especially when they are connected to professional preparation and the development of specific competencies, can help bridge the perceived gap between the liberal arts and a student’s career path. Programs that make discernment of vocation and calling central to the student experience are particularly effective when presidents demonstrate strong leadership, at a personal as well as professional level. Three presidents will describe their own involvement in such programs and will discuss how this work has contributed to the overall health of their institutions as well as enriched their professional lives.<br><blockquote><strong><em>J. Timothy Cloyd</em></strong>, President, Drury University<br><strong><em>Kent L. Henning</em></strong>, President, Grand View University<br><strong><em>Susan Traverso</em></strong>, President, Thiel College<br></blockquote></div><div><h3><br>Legal Nightmares That Keep Presidents Awake</h3>Today’s headlines routinely feature issues that weigh on campus leaders, including the “Varsity Blues” admissions scandal; institutional funding and enrollment challenges; new and confusing federal and state compliance mandates, including Title IX; increased litigation from student injuries and deaths; violent protests and controversial speakers; and demands for social justice. As a result, presidents need to navigate in a culture that is increasingly critical of higher education. A leading higher education attorney will offer insights on how presidents can address the many legal nightmares they face—and help them sleep a little better.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Peter F. Lake</em></strong>, Professor of Law, Charles A. Dana Chair, and Director, Center for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy, Stetson University, and Senior Higher Education Attorney, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC<br></blockquote></div><div><h3><br>Meeting the Mental Health and Wellness Needs of the Campus</h3>Presidents are well aware that there is a mental health crisis on college campuses. By some estimates, more than a third of college students report experiencing mental health condition symptoms, up from one in ten just a few decades ago. How<br>can independent colleges and universities identify and support students who need help? What strategies can ensure that students have access to the counseling and other mental health services that they need—and how can these services best be funded? How can campuses move beyond addressing individual students in crisis to creating a campus-wide approach to health and wellness? What is the president’s role in addressing this crisis?<br><blockquote><strong><em>Troy D. Hammond</em></strong>, President, North Central College Diane E. Melby, President, Our Lady of the Lake University<br><strong><em>Diane E. Melby</em></strong>, President, Our Lady of the Lake University<br><strong><em>Nance Roy</em></strong>, Chief Clinical Officer, The Jed Foundation<br></blockquote></div><div><h3><br>Strategies for Mergers, Acquisitions, and Teach-Outs</h3>Presidents and others who have navigated the process of considering a merger, acquisition, or teach-out will share insights from their experiences. When is the right time to initiate internal conversations about the possibility of a major institutional realignment, and with whom should these conversations start? When and how should prospective partners be engaged? What if there is a need to change course midway? When and how should the public be informed of any of these deliberations? How do these considerations differ depending on whether the institution is looking to “acquire” another institution or looking for a partner institution that can provide financial stability?<br><blockquote><strong><em>David R. Evans</em></strong>, Interim President, American University in Bulgaria<br><strong><em>Timothy L. Hall</em></strong>, President, Mercy College (NY)<br><strong><em>Kasia Lundy</em></strong>, Managing Director, EY-Parthenon<br><strong><em>Michele D. Perkins</em></strong>, President, New England College</blockquote></div><div><br></div><div><h3>Using Data to Integrate Enrollment, Student Success, and Alumni Engagement</h3>Enrollment volatility and demographic shifts on the horizon will require new ways to assess risk, measure performance, and identify opportunities across the marketplace. Recently<br>developed data-analytic tools enable colleges to connect cross- campus datasets to track the entire student lifecycle—from first inquiry to final gift. Learn how CIC presidents use integrated data to measure institutional performance, understand the broader marketplace, and inform strategic planning.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Brian J. Bruess</em></strong>, President, St. Norbert College<br><strong><em>James H. Day</em></strong>, Founding Principal, Farrell Day<br><strong>Kent C. Trachte</strong>, President, Lycoming College</blockquote></div>
BreakfastBreakfast26
Concurrent Sessions (including lunch)Concurrent Sessions (including lunch)73Concurrent Session(Boxed lunches will be available.)<br><div><br></div><h3>Approaches to Civic Engagement and Collaboration with the Local Community</h3>How can civic engagement programs strengthen students’ academic skills and social responsibility while developing partnerships with the local community? The discussion will consider factors that maximize the impact of these programs, including how to build strong connections among the curriculum, the campus, and the local community and how to encourage students to connect knowledge with real-world responsibilities. Presenters will describe specific projects they have implemented that can be adapted to other settings, including programs that explore questions of citizenship in times of social crisis; use multimedia storytelling to assist incarcerated individuals with re-entry; and engage local high school students in historical research that illuminates the connection between history and contemporary issues of social justice.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Constance Ledoux Book</em></strong>, President, Elon University<br><strong><em>Marvin Krislov</em></strong>, President, Pace University<br><strong><em>Jan Risë Liss</em></strong>, Executive Director, Project Pericles<br><strong><em>David A. Thomas</em></strong>, President, Morehouse College<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Benchmarks for Institutional Health<br></h3>Institutional financial health and mission fulfillment go hand in hand. A good business model, monitored by the right financial metrics, produces sustainability for both. Many colleges and universities today are reviewing their current business models. This session will explore which financial metrics presidents should rely on to consider what their institutions need to achieve in order to be strong and sustainable. Presenters will discuss macro indicators, such as the CIC Financial Indicators Tool metrics, and micro indicators related to university operations, including instructional costs and co-curricular offerings.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Bobby L. Hall</em></strong>, President, Wayland Baptist University<br><strong><em>Michael Williams</em></strong>, President, The Austen Group, a Division of RNL<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Considerations for a Second Presidency</h3>What factors should be weighed by presidents who are considering a second presidency? Drawing on their experiences of having made this transition successfully, three presidential peers will discuss such questions as: How do I know if the time is right for a move? What needs to be considered when leaving the first presidency? How can presidential experience at one institution be beneficial—or detrimental—to leading another? What may be different the second time around? How might trustees, faculty members, and staff view the experience of a leader from a different institution? What are the implications for the presidential family in considering a second presidency?<br><blockquote><strong><em>Roslyn Clark Artis</em></strong>, President and CEO, Benedict College<br><strong><em>Jonathan Brand</em></strong>, President, Cornell College (IA)<br><strong><em>John C. Knapp</em></strong>, President, Washington & Jefferson College<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Documenting and Promoting the Labor Market Outcomes of the Liberal Arts</h3>A widely-held myth is that a liberal arts degree has little value in the labor market. Findings from a study on the labor market outcomes of a liberal arts education, conducted by Emsi and Strada Education Network, have debunked this myth. Panelists will discuss the study’s outcomes and how colleges and universities can use data to increase appreciation for the value of a liberal arts education with students, parents, faculty members, policy makers, community members, and business leaders.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Gary Brahm</em></strong>, Chancellor, Brandman University<br><strong><em>Ann McElaney-Johnson</em></strong>, President, Mount Saint Mary’s University (CA)<br><strong><em>Rob Sentz</em></strong>, Chief Innovation Officer, Emsi<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Preparing for the Unexpected: Natural Disasters and Other Campus Crises</h3>Whether triggered by natural disasters, civil unrest, or even mass shootings, crises on campus and in the surrounding community can deeply affect the educational enterprise of the institution. What approaches can the presidents use to lead their institutions in times of crisis? How can they be responsive to the urgent needs of their communities without losing sight of the academic priorities of their institutions? What learning opportunities for students do local crises present? Presidents who have weathered such crises and natural disasters will share insights from their experiences.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Joseph G. Joyner</em></strong>, President, Flagler College<br><strong><em>Richard L. Ludwick</em></strong>, President, University of St. Thomas (TX)<br><strong><em>Julie E. Wollman</em></strong>, President, Widener University<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Presidents “Open Mike”</h3><em>(Open only to currently serving college and university presidents)</em><br>This forum is an opportunity to raise confidential and sensitive issues. The discussion is expected to be candid and broad- ranging, from specific administrative matters to institutional structures and staffing, to dealings with the board, to the relationship between a president’s professional and personal lives. Advice will come from other participating presidents.<br><blockquote>Moderator: <strong><em>Paul C. Pribbenow</em></strong>, President, Augsburg University</blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions137Concurrent Session<h3>​Focusing the Board on Strategic Priorities</h3>What approaches can presidents use to help their boards resist the tendency to function in routinized ways—receiving reports, setting tuition, and approving budgets? In today’s dynamic higher education environment, boards must be savvy about demographic and economic trends, cognizant of institutional strengths and areas of vulnerability, sensitive to market opportunities, and able to help the president make important strategic decisions about the future direction of the institution. Presidents who have helped their boards elevate their agendas to focus on strategic priorities will lead the discussion.<br> <blockquote><div> <strong><em>Gayle D. Beebe</em></strong>, President, Westmont College<br><strong><em>Rock Jones</em></strong>, President, Ohio Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Elizabeth J. Stroble</em></strong>, Chancellor, Webster University </div></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Fostering Diversity and Civility in Liberal Arts Colleges</h3>What is the president’s role in fostering diversity and civility on a college campus? How can presidents help their institutions respect divergent viewpoints, support students from diverse backgrounds, acknowledge the multiple identities that students bring to campus, and promote inclusive pedagogy—often in the face of student dissatisfaction with and faculty concerns over the pace of change? CIC helped campus teams explore these challenges during two Diversity, Civility, and the Liberal Arts Institutes. The director of the Institute and presidents of two participating institutions will share insights and lessons learned from this initiative.<br> <blockquote> <span><span><strong><em>Susan S. Hasseler</em></strong>, President, Muskingum University</span></span><br><span><span><strong><em>Beverly Daniel Tatum</em></strong>, President Emerita, Spelman College</span></span><br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Improving Student Success through Technology Transformation</h3>How can technology help colleges and universities with limited resources create more sustainable operating models while better supporting student success? Three CIC presidents will discuss how they are maximizing the return on investment in technology purchases from two points of view: their business models<br>and their commitment to student success. The presenters will describe effective approaches in both areas. Panelists also will discuss the importance of cybersecurity practices and policies.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>David A. Armstrong</em></strong>, President, St. Thomas University (FL)<br><strong><em>Paula Marie Buley, IHM</em></strong>, President, Rivier University<br><strong><em>Robert S. Cominsky</em></strong>, Vice President of Managed Services, Ellucian<br><strong><em>Kevin G. Quinn</em></strong>, President, Aquinas College (MI)<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Navigating Troubling Waters: Economic Trends and Implications for Independent Higher Education</h3>As the public increasingly views college as an investment for a better life and career, the demand for a more meaningful return on its cost is growing. How do different stakeholders think about the return on an investment in higher education? Colleges and universities are susceptible to regional, national, and macroeconomic trends, so institutional leaders need to consider both public perceptions and economic trends in their strategic institutional planning. Presenters will discuss higher education’s contributions to the economy and society and will highlight economic trends that are especially relevant to independent colleges and universities.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Amy McCormack</em></strong>, President, Calumet College of St. Joseph<br><strong><em>David P. Richardson</em></strong>, Managing Director of Research, TIAA Institute<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Perspectives from Journalists: What’s on the Public’s Mind? What’s on Presidents’ Minds?</h3>In the last year, several media stories have focused on aspects of admissions: The “Varsity Blues” scandal, the College Board’s “adversity” score, and the Supreme Court case on affirmative action are three prominent examples. Journalists who cover higher education will offer their perspectives on why college admissions has been of such strong public interest recently before opening a general discussion.<br> <blockquote> <strong><em>Anemona Hartocollis</em></strong>, National Higher Education Reporter, <cite>The New York Times</cite><br><strong><em>Rick Seltzer</em></strong>, Projects Editor, <cite>Inside Higher Ed</cite><br><strong><em>Delece Smith-Barrow</em></strong>, Senior Editor for Higher Education, <cite>The Hechinger Report</cite><br>Moderator: <strong> <em>Nayef H. Samhat</em></strong>, President, Wofford College<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Return on Athletics: Data on the Value of Sports at Smaller Colleges</h3>One strategy to increase enrollment and improve retention is to establish or expand an athletics program. There is little empirical data, however, to assess institutional returns associated with investments in athletics. As a result, many presidents lack the information they need to understand how a strong athletics program could contribute to broader strategic priorities. One approach to closing the data gap is the Return on Athletics initiative of the NAIA, which uses analysis of student-level data to show the impact of athletics on enrollment, student success, and financial viability. Presenters will discuss critical factors and metrics to evaluate intercollegiate athletics and will offer insights from their experiences.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Jim Carr</em></strong>, President and CEO, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA)<br><strong><em>Arvid C. Johnson</em></strong>, President, University of St. Francis (IL)<br><strong><em>Amy C. Novak</em></strong>, President, Dakota Wesleyan University<br> </blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>What to Expect from Your Enrollment Management Team?</h3>What is the president’s role in working with the enrollment management team? What do presidents need to know?<br>What questions should they ask? How should they assess the effectiveness of the admissions and financial aid offices?<br>Presenters will offer insights based on their experience and will address audience members’ questions.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Marc M. Camille</em></strong>, President, Albertus Magnus College<br><strong><em>Panayiotis Kanelos</em></strong>, President, St. John’s College (MD)<br><strong><em>Chris Marett</em></strong>, President, Enrollment and Advancement Marketing Services, EAB<br><strong><em>Michael C. Maxey</em></strong>, President, Roanoke College</blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions138Concurrent Session<h3>​Creating Value: Improving Instruction and Student Outcomes with Career Guidance</h3>Addressing doubts about the value of a liberal arts education is an increasingly important part of the president’s job. While studies consistently find that CIC institutions outperform national averages on student success measures, students and parents are demanding greater evidence that they produce well-prepared, career-ready graduates. The CIC Consortium for Instructional Excellence and Career Guidance, organized by the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) with support from Strada Education Network, provides an effective approach to addressing these concerns by focusing on the improvement of student learning, degree completion, and career outcomes. Panelists will share lessons learned from a renewed focus on instructional excellence and career guidance and reflect on changing faculty attitudes about the relationship between a quality liberal arts education and career-readiness.<br><blockquote><strong><em>James T. (Tim) Barry</em></strong>, President, Alderson Broaddus University<br><strong><em>Jonathan Gyurko</em></strong>, President and Co-Founder, Association of College and University Educators (ACUE)<br><strong><em>Lillian B. Schumacher</em></strong>, President, Tiffin University<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Developing Binational Partnerships: Lessons and Examples from the U.S.-Mexico Summit</h3>Developing binational partnerships with universities in Mexico is of critical importance in today’s sociopolitical climate. Institutions on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border have a relatively untapped opportunity to develop notable partnerships because of their proximity to one another, high quality of educational offerings, and rich cultural resources on campuses and in their surrounding communities. Three presidents who participated in the April 2019 U.S.-Mexico Higher Education Summit will discuss partnerships that their institutions have created with colleagues on the other side of the border, including ways to mobilize both faculty members and students, short-term and semester-long programs, and online collaboration. Financial and scheduling considerations, which often present challenges when developing binational partnerships, also will be covered.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Steven C. Bahls</em></strong>, President, Augustana College (IL)<br><strong><em>Donna M. Carroll</em></strong>, President, Dominican University (IL)<br><strong><em>José Antonio Esquivias Romero</em></strong>, Rector, Universidad Panamericana Guadalajara (Mexico)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>How to Manage the Challenges of the Presidency</h3>Presidents increasingly must contend with financial and enrollment challenges, public mistrust, tensions with the faculty, pressures from the board, and unexpected crises, any of which can derail a presidency without warning. What contractual and financial arrangements should presidents consider to protect their positions—and their sanity? An experienced higher education attorney and an experienced compensation consultant will offer guidance on how to manage the challenges of the presidency.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Frank A. Casagrande</em></strong>, President, Casagrande Consulting, LLC<br><strong><em>Raymond D. Cotton</em></strong>, Partner, Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Setting the Pace: Presidential Strategies for Leading Fundamental Change</h3>In the midst of demographic headwinds, challenges to the business model, and the expanding use of educational technology, many leaders of independent colleges are being asked by their boards to lead swift and often fundamental change. Presidents’ own analyses may reinforce the notion that significant change is necessary to ensure institutional viability. At the same time, faculty and staff members may not be convinced that substantial change is necessary. How do presidents effectively communicate their vision for the future and the changes needed to implement it? How can presidents navigate rapidly shifting external dynamics and still honor shared governance? What can we learn from those who have led substantial change?<br><blockquote><strong><em>Daniel A. DiBiasio</em></strong>, President, Ohio Northern University<br><strong><em>David Finegold</em></strong>, President, Chatham University<br><strong><em>Mary B. Marcy</em></strong>, President, Dominican University of California<br>Moderator: <strong><em>Susan Resneck Pierce</em></strong>, President Emerita, University of Puget Sound<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Trends in Philanthropy and Federal Grants</h3>What are the recent trends in philanthropic support from foundations and grants from the federal government and what are their implications for independent colleges and universities? Three distinguished leaders will offer their insights and encourage presidents to consider external support for their initiatives that match the criteria for a wide range of funding sources—including from individuals, corporations, foundations, and governmental support.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Jacque Carter</em></strong>, President, Doane University<br><strong><em>John McAllister</em></strong>, Managing Partner, McAllister & Quinn<br><strong><em>Michael J. Murray</em></strong>, President, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Working with the President’s Staff</h3><div><em>(Joint Session with Presidential Spouses and Partners)</em><br></div><div>Each college president’s office has a culture of its own, with distinctive personalities and features, some established across multiple presidential administrations. How can presidential couples develop and sustain strong individual relationships with each member of the president’s staff, while ensuring that the office functions well as a cohesive whole to implement the president’s agenda? What does it take to change staff expectations, long-held practices, and office culture? How can presidential spouses or partners get the support and information they need from staff who have varying expectations of the spouse’s or partner’s role? Presidential couples from two institutions will offer strategies for working with staff members to maintain healthy communication and strong relations.</div><blockquote><strong><em>Lynn Brandsma</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, University of New England<br><strong><em>James Herbert</em></strong>, President, University of New England<br><strong><em>Annie Cook Miller</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Virginia Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Scott D. Miller</em></strong>, President, Virginia Wesleyan University</blockquote>
Session for Presidential Spouses and PartnersSession for Presidential Spouses and Partners11Spouses and Partners<h3>Readers’ Theatre Reprise: Historical (and Hysterical?) Presidential Spouse and Partner Roles</h3> How does the historic role of the presidential spouse or partner compare with the modern view of the role? Spouses and partners will participate in a “readers’ theatre” presentation of advice from past decades and will reflect on how the role and the campus and societal cultural context has evolved.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Robyn Allers</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, McDaniel College<br><strong><em>Randy Richardson</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Westminster College (PA)<br><strong><em>J. Lawrence Smith</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, York College of Pennsylvania</blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions27Concurrent Session<h3>Building an Effective Senior Team: Stronger Leaders for Stressed Institutions</h3>How can presidents cultivate leadership team members who understand environmental challenges, support the president’s  <br>vision, and maximize institutional opportunities? Panelists will consider how to orchestrate changes in the leadership team with grace and dignity, address hiring with an eye for team functioning, and discuss innovation and problem solving that maintains an institutional focus. Other topics include achieving work/life balance, fostering interpersonal and institutional trust and hope, assessing annual operational priorities vs. long-term development, and managing risk.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Mary Ann Gawelek</em></strong>, President, Lourdes University<br><strong><em>Ronald A. Matthews</em></strong>, President, Eastern University<br><strong><em>James Troha</em></strong>, President, Juniata College<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Collaborating to Share Curriculum and Cost<br></h3>How can liberal arts colleges work together to address questions of affordability, accessibility, and adequacy of preparation for students to enter today’s job market? What cross-institutional collaborations can lower costs, maintain academic quality, and address institutional sustainability in the face of market challenges in higher education? What is the role of the president in facilitating this collaboration? One group of 19 independent colleges and universities, the Lower Cost Models Consortium, is developing multiple forms of collaboration, including shared curricular opportunities such as certified financial planning and  <br>applied computer science. Presidents will describe successful strategies of the consortium to achieve voluntary institutional cost sharing and buy-in from both administrative and faculty teams to offer jointly curricula that institutions would find difficult to maintain individually. Learn how participating institutions have cultivated the openness and trust to develop new opportunities and share responsibility.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Jeffrey R. Docking</em></strong>, President, Adrian College<br><strong><em>Charles L. Flynn</em></strong>, President, College of Mount Saint Vincent<br><strong><em>Antoinette M. Hays</em></strong>, President, Regis College (MA)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Support for Veterans’ Educational Aspirations<br></h3>Veterans and military students often take a less traditional path to college, and many face formidable challenges in finishing a college degree. Presenters will discuss ways their institutions help veterans and their dependents meet these challenges and succeed as undergraduate students. The session also will highlight results from a survey of veterans support practices at CIC institutions.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Greg Gunderson</em></strong>, President, Park University<br><strong><em>Chris Howard</em></strong>, President, Robert Morris University<br><strong><em>Lesley McBain</em></strong>, Director of Research Projects, CIC<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>New Approaches to Personal Wellness during Difficult Times<br></h3><div><em>(Joint Session with Presidential Spouses and Partners)</em><br></div><div>The job of a college president has always been challenging, but recent developments in higher education can mean even more stress for presidents and their spouses or partners. Tried- and-true strategies for professional wellness include carving out personal time and establishing boundaries with sufficient space for family needs. But in these difficult times, given the dynamic nature of presidential careers, greater flexibility and stamina is required. What are some approaches that presidential couples can use to adapt to new challenges, to maintain healthy relationships, and to thrive in uncertain times? Two presidential couples will share their stories of how they overcame hurdles to achieving their wellness goals.</div><blockquote><strong><em>Cindy Gnadinger</em></strong>, President, Carroll University (WI)<br><strong><em>John Gnadinger</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Carroll University (WI)<br><strong><em>D. Mark McCoy</em></strong>, President, DePauw University<br><strong><em>Lisa McCoy</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, DePauw University</blockquote>
New Presidents Program (including Spouses and Partners of New Presidents)New Presidents Program (including Spouses and Partners of New Presidents)1<em>Including Spouses and Partners of New Presidents<br></em><br><strong>Friday, January 3, 7:45 a.m.–8:30 p.m.<br>Saturday, January 4, 7:00 a.m.–3:15 p.m.</strong><br><br>CIC’s annual New Presidents Program, held immediately prior to the Presidents Institute, provides the “need to know” tools and the counsel that will keep a young presidency on a smooth course. PDFThis year’s program includes—among other topics—sessions on enrollment and marketing, financial fundamentals, board relations, institutional advancement, strategic innovation, and perspectives on critical leadership. The program also will provide informal opportunities to discuss institutional mission and culture as well as work-life balance, and it will facilitate getting to know others new to the office. The presenters are experienced independent college and university presidents, many of whom are alumni of the program.<br><br>CIC offers a concurrent program for spouses and partners of recently appointed college presidents. The program, led by experienced presidential spouses and partners, acknowledges that presidential spouses and partners serve in a variety of capacities within and outside their institution. Some will continue employment in professions away from campus while others will not. The program encourages spouses and partners to network with others who are new to the role and to consider, intentionally, how to define the role to fit themselves and their individual campus situations.<br><br> <div>The registration fees for the New Presidents Program are $415 for presidents and $315 for spouses and partners and include all meals and materials. Please pre-register for this program. To add this program to an already completed registration, please contact Sherita C. Ashmon, CIC conference manager, by phone at (202) 466-7230 or by email at <a href="mailto:sashmon@cic.nche.edu">sashmon@cic.nche.edu</a>.</div><div> <br> </div><div> <br> </div> <h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">SESSIONS FOR NEW PRESIDENTS </h3> <br> <strong>7:45–8:30 a.m.</strong> <h4>Registration and Breakfast</h4> <br> <strong>8:45–9:00 a.m.</strong> <h4>Welcoming Remarks</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Mary Pat Seurkamp</em></strong>, Senior Advisor and Director, CIC New Presidents Program, and President Emerita, Notre Dame of Maryland University<br></blockquote> <br> <strong>9:00–10:00 a.m.</strong> <h4>Making Connections</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>L. Jay Lemons</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Susquehanna University, and President, Academic Search<br></blockquote> <br><strong>10:15–11:15 a.m.</strong> <h4>The Changed Environment for Presidential Leadership: Innovation and Beyond</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Paul Hennigan</em></strong>, President, Point Park University<br><strong><em>Mary B. Marcy</em></strong>, President, Dominican University of California<br></blockquote> <br> <strong>11:15 a.m.–12:30 p.m.</strong> <h4>Financial Fundamentals and Strategies for the New President</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Arvid C. Johnson</em></strong>, President, University of St. Francis (IL)<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">SESSIONS FOR SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF NEW PRESIDENTS<br></h3><div> <br> <strong>7:45–8:30 a.m.</strong> <h4>Registration and Breakfast</h4> <br> <strong>8:45–9:00 a.m.</strong> <h4>Welcoming Remarks</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Kerry E. Pannell</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Programs, CIC<br><br>Session Facilitators: <strong> <em>Lynne C. Joyce</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Brevard College, and <strong> <em>J. Lawrence Smith</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, York College of Pennsylvania<br></blockquote></div><div> <br> <strong>9:00–10:00 a.m.</strong> <h4>Making Connections</h4> <br> <strong>10:00–11:00 a.m</strong>. <h4>Transitioning into the Presidential Spouse or Partner Role</h4> <br> <strong>11:15–12:00 p.m.</strong> <h4>Higher Ed 101</h4> <br> <strong>12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m.</strong> <h4>Getting Off to a Great Start</h4></div><div> <br> </div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">JOINT LUNCHEON FOR NEW PRESIDENTS AND SPOUSES AND PARTNERS<br></h3><div> <br> <strong>12:30–1:45 p.m.</strong> <h4>Welcome</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Carol A. Leary</em></strong>, President, Bay Path University, and Chair, CIC New Presidents Program Advisory Committee<br></blockquote>  <h4>Remarks: Creating an Engaged and Inclusive Environment for All</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Mary Dana Hinton</em></strong>, President, College of Saint Benedict<br></blockquote></div><div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B"> <br>SESSIONS FOR NEW PRESIDENTS </h3> <br> <strong>2:00–2:30 p.m.</strong> <h4>Engaged and Inclusive Environment: Q&A and Discussion</h4><blockquote>Facilitator: <strong> <em>Mary Dana Hinton</em></strong>, President, College of Saint Benedict<br></blockquote> <br> <strong>2:30–3:30 p.m.</strong> <h4>Perspectives on Critical Leadership Issues</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Colette Pierce Burnette</em></strong>, President, Huston-Tillotson University<br><strong><em>Mary-Beth A. Cooper</em></strong>, President, Springfield College<br><strong><em>Arvid C. Johnson</em></strong>, President, University of St. Francis (IL)<br>Moderator: <strong> <em>Mary Pat Seurkamp</em></strong><br></blockquote> <br><strong>3:45–4:15 p.m.</strong> <h4>Small Group Discussions on Critical Leadership Issues</h4><blockquote>Facilitator: <strong> <em>Mary Pat Seurkamp</em></strong><br></blockquote> <br> <strong>4:15–5:00 p.m.</strong> <h4>I Wish I Had Known What I Know Now</h4><blockquote> <strong> <em>Lynn M. Morton</em></strong>, President, Warren Wilson College<br><strong><em>Elfred Anthony Pinkard</em></strong>, President, Wilberforce University<br></blockquote></div><div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B"> <br>SESSIONS FOR SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF NEW PRESIDENTS</h3><blockquote>Facilitators: <strong> <em>Lynne C. Joyce</em></strong> and <strong> <em>J. Lawrence Smith</em></strong><br></blockquote> <br> <strong>2:00–3:15 p.m.</strong> <h4>Building Trust</h4> <br> <strong>3:30–4:30 p.m.</strong> <h4>Building Resiliency</h4> <br><strong>4:30–5:00 p.m.</strong> <h4>Open Mike—Questions and Comments</h4><blockquote>Facilitator: <strong> <em>Kerry E. Pannell</em></strong><br></blockquote></div><div> <br> </div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">RECEPTION AND DINNER FOR NEW PRESIDENTS AND SPOUSES AND PARTNERS</h3> <br> <strong>6:30–8:30 p.m.</strong><br> <blockquote>Hosts: <strong> <em>Paul Hennigan</em></strong>, President, Point Park University, and <strong> <em>Lynne C. Joyce</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Brevard College<br></blockquote> <br> <h4>Remarks</h4>Richard Ekman, President, CIC
New Presidents Program (including Spouses and Partners of New Presidents)New Presidents Program (including Spouses and Partners of New Presidents)29<em>Including Spouses and Partners of New Presidents<br></em><br><strong>Friday, January 3, 7:45 a.m.–8:30 p.m.<br>Saturday, January 4, 7:00 a.m.–3:15 p.m.</strong><br><br>CIC’s annual New Presidents Program, held immediately prior to the Presidents Institute, provides the “need to know” tools and the counsel that will keep a young presidency on a smooth course. PDFThis year’s program includes—among other topics—sessions on enrollment and marketing, financial fundamentals, board relations, institutional advancement, strategic innovation, and perspectives on critical leadership. The program also will provide informal opportunities to discuss institutional mission and culture as well as work-life balance, and it will facilitate getting to know others new to the office. The presenters are experienced independent college and university presidents, many of whom are alumni of the program.<br><br>CIC offers a concurrent program for spouses and partners of recently appointed college presidents. The program, led by experienced presidential spouses and partners, acknowledges that presidential spouses and partners serve in a variety of capacities within and outside their institution. Some will continue employment in professions away from campus while others will not. The program encourages spouses and partners to network with others who are new to the role and to consider, intentionally, how to define the role to fit themselves and their individual campus situations.<br><br> <div>The registration fees for the New Presidents Program are $415 for presidents and $315 for spouses and partners and include all meals and materials. Please pre-register for this program. To add this program to an already completed registration, please contact Sherita C. Ashmon, CIC conference manager, by phone at (202) 466-7230 or by email at <a href="mailto:sashmon@cic.nche.edu">sashmon@cic.nche.edu</a>.</div><div> <br> </div><div> <br> </div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">SESSIONS FOR NEW PRESIDENTS </h3><br><strong>7:15–8:00 a.m.</strong><h4>Breakfast</h4> <br><strong>8:15–9:45 a.m.</strong><h4>Working with the Board— Basics and Beyond</h4><blockquote><strong><em>Jeff Abernathy</em></strong>, President, Alma College<br><strong><em>Mary Schmidt Campbell</em></strong>, President, Spelman College<br>Moderator: <strong><em>Douglas M. Orr</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Warren Wilson College<br></blockquote><br><strong>10:00–11:00 a.m.</strong><h4>Enrollment, Marketing, and Today’s Students: Getting Them and Keeping Them</h4><blockquote><strong><em>Brian C. Ralph</em></strong>, President, William Peace University<br></blockquote><br><strong></strong><strong>11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m.</strong><h4>The President and Institutional Advancement</h4><blockquote><strong><em>David C. Joyce</em></strong>, President, Brevard College<br><strong><em>Michele D. Perkins</em></strong>, President, New England College<br></blockquote> <h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">SESSIONS FOR SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF NEW PRESIDENTS</h3><blockquote>Facilitators: <strong><em>Lynne C. Joyce</em></strong> and <strong><em>J. Lawrence Smith</em></strong><br></blockquote><br><strong>7:15–8:00 a.m.</strong><h4>Breakfast</h4><br><strong>8:15–9:45 a.m.</strong><h4>Making the Role Work for You</h4><br><strong>10:00–11:00 a.m.</strong><h4>Taking Charge of Your Role</h4><br><strong>11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m.</strong><h4>The Presidential Spouse and Partner and Institutional Advancement</h4><div><br></div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">JOINT LUNCHEON FOR NEW PRESIDENTS AND SPOUSES AND PARTNERS<br></h3><div><br><strong>12:30–2:00 p.m.</strong><h4>You Got the Job, Now What?</h4><blockquote><strong><em>Logan C. Hampton</em></strong>, President, Lane College<br></blockquote></div><div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B"><br>SESSIONS FOR NEW PRESIDENTS </h3><br><strong>2:15–3:15 p.m.</strong><h4>Closing Remarks, Questions, and Initial Evaluation</h4><blockquote>Facilitator: <strong><em>Mary Pat Seurkamp</em></strong><br></blockquote></div><div><br></div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">SESSIONS FOR SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF NEW PRESIDENTS<br></h3><div><blockquote>Facilitators: <strong><em>Lynne C. Joyce</em></strong> and <strong><em>J. Lawrence Smith</em></strong><br></blockquote><br><strong>2:15–3:00 p.m.</strong><h4>Additional Perspectives: Panel of Spouses and Partners Task Force Members<br></h4><br><strong>3:00–3:15 p.m</strong>.<h4>Questions and Closing Remarks</h4></div>
Workshop: Understanding Compliance Risk—How to Protect Your Institution and Your JobWorkshop: Understanding Compliance Risk—How to Protect Your Institution and Your Job11Workshop <em><span><span><em></em></span></span>Please note that advance registration is required for all workshops, as space is limited. Spouses and partners may register on a space-available basis. Workshop fees cover materials and refreshments. To add a workshop to an already completed registration, please contact Sherita C. Ashmon, CIC conference manager, by phone at (202) 446-7230 or by email at <a href="mailto:sashmon@cic.nche.edu">sashmon@cic.nche.edu</a>.<br></em> <div> <em> <br></em></div><div> <em></em>Failure to meet institutional compliance obligations can have devastating consequences for independent colleges and universities. Institutions have closed, and senior administrators have even been jailed, as a consequence of noncompliant behaviors on campus. Two experienced higher education attorneys and a seasoned college president will lead a discussion of the range of compliance risks confronting institutions, an overview of the contents of an effective institutional compliance policy, and suggested steps toward creating a culture of compliance on campus. Managing compliance risk is the single best way to make trustees happy, minimize legal fees, and protect your institution’s reputation.<br></div><blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Thomas J. Botzman</em></strong>, President, Misericordia University<br><strong><em>Susan Llewellyn Deniker</em></strong>, Attorney and Labor and Employment Practice Group Chair, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC<br><strong><em>Jim Newberry</em></strong>, Attorney and Higher Education Practice Team Chair, Steptoe & Johnson PLLC<br></blockquote> Fee: $50
Associated MeetingsAssociated Meetings9<h3>Executive Officers of CIC State Councils</h3><blockquote><div>Conveners: <strong><em>Ray Martinez III</em></strong>, President, Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas, and <strong><em>Carol M. Schuler</em></strong>, Vice President for State Council Programs, CIC</div></blockquote><br><h3>Rural Higher Education Initiative</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Amy C. Novak</em></strong>, President, Dakota Wesleyan University</blockquote>
Sessions for Presidential Spouses and PartnersSessions for Presidential Spouses and Partners136Spouses and Partners<strong>1:30–2:25 p.m.</strong><h3>Joys and Pitfalls of Taking on the Role of Presidential Spouse/Partner</h3>Although the expectations of a presidential spouse are rarely clear, there are unwritten rules about presidential spouse or partner behavior that are learned through experience. An author and presidential spouse will share his insightful and often humorous take on being a college president’s spouse. This session will encourage discussion of the surprising aspects of being the spouse or partner of a college president and provide an opportunity to share approaches to dealing with unexpected challenges in the role.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Robert L. Williams</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, College of Saint Benedict<br></blockquote><br><strong>2:35–3:30 p.m.</strong><h3>“Open Mike” for Presidential Spouses and Partners</h3><em>(Open only to currently serving spouses and partners)</em><br>The confidential session allows spouses and partners to share issues and concerns, as well as tips and advice.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Jennifer Troha</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Juniata College</blockquote>
Sessions for Presidential Spouses and PartnersSessions for Presidential Spouses and Partners138Spouses and Partners<h3>Promises, Promises: The Sticky Wicket of Getting What You Need from Campus Dining Services</h3>Whether dining services are run in-house or outsourced, campus food providers truly intend to please you as a key client. But sometimes the special occasion does not turn out how you envisioned. What are the main challenges that lead to disappointing food service? How can you prevent problems and ensure quality for your big events? This session will offer actionable techniques and an opportunity to ask specific questions about how to improve campus dining services.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Margaret Empie</em></strong>, President, Empie Advising, LLC<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Working with the President’s Staff</h3><em>(Joint Session with Presidents)</em><br>Each college president’s office has a culture of its own, with distinctive personalities and features, some established across multiple presidential administrations. How can presidential couples develop and sustain strong individual relationships with each member of the president’s staff, while ensuring that the office functions well as a cohesive whole to implement the president’s agenda? What does it take to change staff expectations, long-held practices, and office culture? How can presidential spouses or partners get the support and information they need from staff who have varying expectations of the spouse’s or partner’s role? Presidential couples from two institutions will offer strategies for working with staff members to maintain healthy communication and strong relations.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Lynn Brandsma</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, University of New England<br><strong><em>James Herbert</em></strong>, President, University of New England<br><strong><em>Annie Cook Miller</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Virginia Wesleyan University<br><strong><em>Scott D. Miller</em></strong>, President, Virginia Wesleyan University</blockquote>
Sessions for Presidential Spouses and Partners (including lunch)Sessions for Presidential Spouses and Partners (including lunch)73Spouses and Partners<h3>“Clean Eating” with Super Foods for Your Campus Dining Program</h3>Cutting processed foods from your diet and “eating clean” is a positive lifestyle change that has many health benefits. “Clean eating” is a great strategy to achieve permanent and lasting good health, without depriving yourself of flavorful food. “Super foods,” so-called because of their high nutrient content, <br>also offer health benefits while enhancing foods or serving as stand-alone meals. Metz’s chefs and dietitians together have developed recipes that boast nutrient-packed dishes with artistic flair and universal appeal. Session participants will have a hands-on opportunity to create a lunch plate, and presenters will discuss how they can be incorporated into campus food services, including catering events. Participants will receive tips on what to look for (and avoid) when grocery shopping, insights into what is done to enhance flavor and nutrition, and answers to questions about ingredients, cooking, and nutrition.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Kim Brenkus</em></strong>, Director, Learning and Development, Metz Culinary Management<br><strong><em>John E. Geronimo</em></strong>, Vice President for Sales, Metz Culinary Management<br><strong><em>Jeffrey Metz</em></strong>, President and CEO, Metz Culinary Management<br><strong><em>Kim Salahie</em></strong>, Director, Culinary Services, Metz Culinary Management<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>The #MeToo Movement from the Presidential Spouse Perspective</h3>The #MeToo Movement highlighted the extent of sexual misconduct and harassment across many industries and professions, including those on college campuses. Where does the role of the presidential spouse or partner fit into this conversation? Given that colleges are both a locus of identity development for students and an environment where gender-based bias and violence takes place, how can presidential spouses and partners support a healthy environment on campus? This session will provide an opportunity to share experiences and discuss positive steps taken to reduce gender bias and sexual misconduct.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Jennifer Troha</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Juniata College<br></blockquote>
CIC Annual Business Meeting (Including breakfast)CIC Annual Business Meeting (Including breakfast)26<div>CIC encourages all member presidents to participate in the Annual Business Meeting. Breakfast will be available.</div><div><br></div><h3>Chair’s Report</h3><div><br></div><h3>Report on the State of CIC</h3><div><br></div><h3>Treasurer’s Report</h3><div><br></div><h3>Secretary and Membership Committee Report: 2020–2021 CIC Dues</h3><div><br></div><h3>Nominations Committee Report</h3><div><br></div><h3>Special Report: Federal Legislative and Regulatory Update</h3><blockquote><div><strong><em>Barbara K. Mistick</em></strong>, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities</div></blockquote>
Presidents Governance AcademyPresidents Governance Academy79<strong>Friday, January 3, 8:00 a.m.–8:30 p.m.<br>Saturday, January 4, 7:15 a.m.–2:00 p.m.</strong><br><em><br>(Supported by the Henry Luce Foundation)</em><br><br>CIC’s annual Presidents Governance Academy, held immediately prior to the Presidents Institute, is an intensive and highly participatory two-day program for experienced CIC member presidents who wish to strengthen and sustain a high- performing board of trustees. Through both time-tested and new approaches, the Academy helps presidents strengthen president-board relations by aligning board bylaws, policies, and practices with principles of good governance that are characteristic of high-performing boards of trustees. Now in its seventh year, the Presidents Governance Academy is unique in its exclusive focus on the perspective of the independent college president. While it respects the distinction between the president’s and the board’s authority, the Academy starts with the premise that the president must have the mandate and the tools to advance efforts with board leaders to develop an effective governing board. Each participant will receive an individualized critique of the institution’s board bylaws and will begin to draft a trustee education and board development plan. Registration for the Academy also provides the opportunity to consult privately by phone with the Academy’s leaders throughout the year.<br><br>Please pre-register for the Presidents Governance Academy. The registration fee for the Academy is $550 thanks to the support of the Henry Luce Foundation. Participation is limited to 20 presidents to provide for candid exchange among participants. Additional institutional officers, trustees, spouses, and others are not eligible to participate in Academy sessions. Spouses and partners of presidents are invited to participate in dinner on Friday, January 3, 2020; participants will have the opportunity to purchase dinner tickets for their guest after they register for the Academy.<br><br>Additional information is available on the <a href="/_layouts/15/FIXUPREDIRECT.ASPX?WebId=8c30f580-60d3-4f8a-b075-8a20a7c4db97&TermSetId=165f7024-8fd0-4ac0-8b0c-3028f6a2845e&TermId=49b93f1c-6716-4c36-90b8-5957c0ef241b">Academy program page</a>.<br><br>Facilitators: <blockquote> <strong> <em>Richard T. (Tom) Ingram</em></strong>, Senior Advisor for President-Board Relations, CIC, and President Emeritus, Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges<br><strong><em>Richard J. Cook</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Allegheny College</blockquote> <br> <br> <strong>8:00–8:45 a.m.</strong> <h3>Registration and Breakfast</h3> <br> <strong>9:00–9:45 a.m.</strong> <h3>Welcome and Introductions</h3><ul><li>Review of participant survey</li><li>What are some of the most vexing challenges presidents face in working with their boards of trustees?</li></ul> <strong>9:45–10:30 a.m.</strong> <h3>Discussion Topics</h3><ul><li>Review of key program themes, facilitator roles, ground rules, and agenda</li><li>What distinguishes a high-performing governing board?</li></ul> <strong>10:45–11:45 a.m.</strong> <h3>Discussion Topics</h3><ul><li>What levers, strategies, and resources are available to presidents to strengthen the board?</li><li>What presidential relationships are particularly key—and sometimes problematic?</li><li>“Shared” governance and relations with the faculty</li></ul> <strong>Noon–1:00 p.m.</strong> <h3>Lunch</h3> <br> <strong>1:15–2:45 p.m.</strong> <h3>Discussion of Best Board Practices (Part 1)</h3><ul><li>Membership: size, composition, terms and term limits, committee on trustees</li><li>Organization: committees, especially executive, and reserved powers</li><li>Meetings</li><li>Trustee philanthropy</li></ul> <strong>3:00–4:30 p.m.</strong> <h3>Discussion of Best Board Practices (Part 2)</h3><ul><li>Retreats</li><li>Trustee orientation programs</li><li>In-service education</li><li>Handbook and trustee information systems</li></ul> <strong>4:30–5:00 p.m.</strong> <h3>Bylaws Discussion</h3><ul><li>Overview of facilitator critiques of participants’ bylaws</li></ul> <strong>6:30–8:30 p.m.</strong> <h3>Reception and Dinner</h3>
Presidents Governance AcademyPresidents Governance Academy2<strong>Friday, January 3, 8:00 a.m.–8:30 p.m.<br>Saturday, January 4, 7:15 a.m.–2:00 p.m.</strong><br><em><br>(Supported by the Henry Luce Foundation)</em><br><br>CIC’s annual Presidents Governance Academy, held immediately prior to the Presidents Institute, is an intensive and highly participatory two-day program for experienced CIC member presidents who wish to strengthen and sustain a high- performing board of trustees. Through both time-tested and new approaches, the Academy helps presidents strengthen president-board relations by aligning board bylaws, policies, and practices with principles of good governance that are characteristic of high-performing boards of trustees. Now in its seventh year, the Presidents Governance Academy is unique in its exclusive focus on the perspective of the independent college president. While it respects the distinction between the president’s and the board’s authority, the Academy starts with the premise that the president must have the mandate and the tools to advance efforts with board leaders to develop an effective governing board. Each participant will receive an individualized critique of the institution’s board bylaws and will begin to draft a trustee education and board development plan. Registration for the Academy also provides the opportunity to consult privately by phone with the Academy’s leaders throughout the year.<br><br>Please pre-register for the Presidents Governance Academy. The registration fee for the Academy is $550 thanks to the support of the Henry Luce Foundation. Participation is limited to 20 presidents to provide for candid exchange among participants. Additional institutional officers, trustees, spouses, and others are not eligible to participate in Academy sessions. Spouses and partners of presidents are invited to participate in dinner on Friday, January 3, 2020; participants will have the opportunity to purchase dinner tickets for their guest after they register for the Academy.<br><br>Additional information is available on the <a href="/_layouts/15/FIXUPREDIRECT.ASPX?WebId=8c30f580-60d3-4f8a-b075-8a20a7c4db97&TermSetId=165f7024-8fd0-4ac0-8b0c-3028f6a2845e&TermId=49b93f1c-6716-4c36-90b8-5957c0ef241b">Academy program page</a>.<br><br>Facilitators: <blockquote> <strong> <em>Richard T. (Tom) Ingram</em></strong>, Senior Advisor for President-Board Relations, CIC, and President Emeritus, Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges<br><strong><em>Richard J. Cook</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Allegheny College</blockquote> <br> <br><strong>7:15–7:45 a.m.</strong><h3>Breakfast</h3><br><strong>7:45–8:30 a.m.</strong><h3>Participant Role Play</h3><br><strong>8:45–9:30 a.m.</strong><h3>Reflections and Discussions</h3><ul><li>On yesterday’s conversations</li><li>On a few articles in the Book of Readings that you find especially helpful or provocative</li></ul><strong>9:30–10:45 a.m.</strong><h3>Discussion Topics</h3><ul><li>How does affiliation with your respective sponsor, founder, congregation, tradition, or other major influence directly affect, positively or negatively, how your governing board is constituted, is organized, or functions?</li><li>What are best practices in performance assessment of the governing board, individual trustees, and the presidency?</li></ul><strong>11:00–11:45 a.m.</strong><h3>One-on-One Bylaws Critique</h3><em>(in teams of two)</em><br> <br><strong>Noon–12:30 p.m.</strong><h3>Review of Bylaws Discussions</h3><br><strong>12:30–2:00 p.m.</strong><h3>Lunch and Discussion</h3><ul><li>What are some effective approaches to in-service trustee education and board development initiatives that have worked for you? What approaches have not worked?</li><li>What is your plan to strengthen governance policies and practices (explicit goals, strategy, and timetable)?</li><li>Closing comments by facilitators and program assessment</li></ul>
CIC Board of Directors MeetingCIC Board of Directors Meeting109
Breakfast Roundtable Discussions and Associated MeetingsBreakfast Roundtable Discussions and Associated Meetings6<div>Breakfast is provided for all registered Institute participants. Several Roundtables are designated for participants who wish to join colleagues to discuss specific topics.</div><div><br></div><div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS </h3></div><div><h4><br>Assessing Strategic and Financial Health</h4>Session leaders will discuss how a new financial health metric can provide college and university leadership teams with visibility into the relative strategic health of their institutions and enable action before regulatory pressures potentially limit operational options. They will describe how this new financial health metric applies to private institutions of all sizes and will offer a range of actionable responses.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Michael B. Alexander</em></strong>, President, Lasell University<br><strong><em>Susan D. Stuebner</em></strong>, President, Colby-Sawyer College<br></blockquote> <h4>Developing Vocational Exploration on Campus</h4>The Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) is a nationwide network of 256 colleges and universities administered by CIC with generous support from Lilly Endowment Inc. to foster the intellectual and theological exploration of vocation among college students. Learn about CIC’s network and discuss the benefits of participation in NetVUE programs and services, including national conferences, regional gatherings, and a number of grant programs to support campus efforts.<br><blockquote><strong><em>David S. Cunningham</em></strong>, Director of NetVUE, CIC<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Finishing Well: How to Prepare for a Presidential Transition</h4>Most institutions today cannot afford a “long good-bye”: the hiatus created by a search, and then the year or two when a new president comes in to provide leadership for the next phase of institutional life. How can presidents and boards work together to design strategic plans that attract new leadership to the institution—rather than waiting for that new leadership to provide that vision—and that ensure ongoing institutional momentum through the leadership transition? What can presidents do to leave their institutions smoothly and help prepare for an effective transition following their departure? The discussion will build on insights gathered from presidents who have recently made this transition or who are preparing for it.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Shirley A. Mullen</em></strong>, President, Houghton College<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Yes We Must Coalition: College Success for All</h4>Independent colleges strive to increase the degree attainment of students from low-income backgrounds. Discussions will examine how the Yes We Must Coalition is supporting independent institutions that enroll 50 percent or<br>more Pell-eligible undergraduates to increase graduation rates and to advocate for low-income students and the institutions that serve them.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Gloria Nemerowicz</em></strong>, Founder and President, Yes We Must Coalition, and former President, Pine Manor College<br></blockquote><br><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">BREAKFAST MEETINGS </h3></div><div><h4><br>CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium Member Presidents</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Norval C. Kneten</em></strong>, Senior Advisor, CIC, and retired President, Barton College<br></blockquote> </div><div><h4>National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Arvid C. Johnson</em></strong>, President, University of St. Francis (IL)<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Nonmember Presidents and Member Presidents Participating in the Institute for the First Time</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>MaryAnn Baenninger</em></strong>, President, Drew University and Chair, CIC Board of Directors<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission Program Past Participants</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Frederik Ohles</em></strong>, Senior Advisor, CIC, and President Emeritus, Nebraska Wesleyan University<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Project Pericles Presidents</h4><blockquote>Conveners: <strong><em>Jan Risë Liss</em></strong>, Executive Director, Project Pericles, and <strong><em>Lyle D. Roelofs</em></strong>, President, Berea College<br></blockquote></div>
Breakfast Roundtable Discussions and Associated MeetingsBreakfast Roundtable Discussions and Associated Meetings16<div>Breakfast is provided for all registered Institute participants. Several Roundtables are designated for participants who wish to join colleagues to discuss specific topics.</div><div> <br> </div><div><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS </h3> </div><div><h4><br>Course Sharing to Support Student Completion</h4>An increasing number of private colleges and universities are engaging in consortial course sharing to support students’ timely progress. CIC’s Online Course Sharing Consortium allows participating colleges to use empty “seats” available in other CIC colleges’ online courses to help students catch up, replace poor grades, remain eligible for athletics and financial aid, and graduate on time. This discussion will address key features of the CIC Online Course Sharing Consortium.<br><blockquote><strong><em></em></strong><strong><em>Carol M. Schuler</em></strong>, Vice President for State Council Programs, CIC<br></blockquote><br></div><div><h4>Finding Interim Candidates for Senior Leadership Positions</h4>The use of outside interim senior administrators has become more common as a foundation for the transformation of colleges and universities. The discussion will explore when and how presidents can use interims, not as placeholders but as agents of change responsible for the achievement of specific strategic objectives.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Bryan E. Carlson</em></strong>, President, The Registry<br><strong><em>Jeffrey Senese</em></strong>, President, Saint Leo University</blockquote></div><div><br><h4>Preparing the Right Aspirants for the Right Presidencies</h4>Learn how CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission program, a yearlong seminar-based program supported by Lilly Endowment Inc., can help senior administrators who aspire to the presidency—and their spouses or partners—clarify their own sense of personal vocation in relationship to the missions of institutions they might one day lead as president. Discuss who on your senior team might be a suitable nominee.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Frederik Ohles</em></strong>, Senior Advisor, CIC and President Emeritus, Nebraska Wesleyan University</blockquote></div><div><br><h4>Preparing Students for Success on the Global Stage</h4>The United Nations Academic Impact and Millennium Campus Network have partnered to offer the Millennium Fellowship—a movement of undergraduates on college campuses across 16 nations advancing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Discuss how this selective leadership development program can help students receive training, make connections, and achieve global recognition of their efforts, as well as how it can help CIC members elevate their social impact and prepare their students for success in the global economy.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Kevin M. Ross</em></strong>, President, Lynn University<br><strong><em>Sam Vaghar</em></strong>, Executive Director, Millennium Campus Network<br></blockquote><br><h3 class="ms-rteElement-H3B">BREAKFAST MEETINGS </h3> </div><div><h4><br>Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Dennis H. Holtschneider, CM</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Council for Christian Colleges & Universities</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Shirley V. Hoogstra</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Presidents of Historically Black Colleges and Universities</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Lester C. Newman</em></strong>, President, Jarvis Christian College<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Presidents of International Colleges and Universities</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Celeste M. Schenck</em></strong>, President, The American University of Paris<br></blockquote></div><div><h4><br>Women’s College Coalition Board of Directors</h4><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Ann McElaney-Johnson</em></strong>, Board Chair, Women’s College Coalition, and President, Mount Saint Mary’s University (CA)</blockquote></div>
Presidential Spouses and Partners Program Welcome, Address, and LuncheonPresidential Spouses and Partners Program Welcome, Address, and Luncheon48Spouses and Partners <h3>Presidential Spouses and Partners: Evolving Expectations</h3><p>Independent college and university presidents and their spouses or partners face  a changing landscape and evolving expectations from campus constituencies. How do these shifting expectations impact the role of spouses or partners on residential campuses? In light of this shifting context, what do search committees and trustees look for in a potential president’s personal relationship? Experienced independent college leaders Jay Lemons and Susan Resneck Pierce will discuss their perspectives on the evolving role of the president’s spouse or partner. Their observations, based on conversations with boards of trustees and key independent college campus leaders, will provide the basis for a deeper discussion of the challenges confronting presidential spouses and partners in the current private higher education environment.<br><br><img src="/p/2020-Presidents-Institute/PublishingImages/Lemons-Jay.jpg" alt="L. Jay Lemons headshot" class="ms-rtePosition-1" style="margin:5px;width:145px;height:197px;" /><strong><em>L. Jay Lemons</em></strong> became president of Academic Search in 2017. He is president emeritus of Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania where he served for over 17 years. Previously, he was chancellor of the University of Virginia’s College at Wise. He began his career as a student affairs officer at Nebraska Wesleyan University, served in admissions at the University of Nebraska, worked in student affairs at Texas A&M University, and was assistant to the president at the University of Virginia. Lemons served as vice chair of the NCAA board of governors and is a former member of the CIC Board of Directors. He is a member of the faculty for CIC’s New Presidents Program. Lemons earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and psychology from Nebraska Wesleyan University, a master’s degree in educational psychology from the University of Nebraska, and a PhD from the University of Virginia in higher education administration.<br><br><img src="/p/2020-Presidents-Institute/PublishingImages/Pierce-Susan-Resneck.jpg" alt="Susan Resneck Pierce headshot" class="ms-rtePosition-1" style="margin:5px;width:145px;height:194px;" /><strong><em>Susan Resneck Pierce</em></strong> is president emerita of the University of Puget Sound in Washington, where she served from 1992 to 2003. Pierce earlier was chair of the English department at Ithaca College, visiting associate professor of English at Princeton University, assistant director of the division of education programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities, dean of the college of arts and science at the University of Tulsa, and vice president for academic affairs at Lewis & Clark College. She is author of <cite>On Being Presidential: A Guide for College and University Leaders</cite> (2011). Pierce earned a bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College, a master’s degree from the University of Chicago, and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, all in English.</p>
Welcoming DinnerWelcoming Dinner5Spouses and Partners<p>Following the keynote address, a combination reception and buffet dinner will provide registered Institute participants with an inviting setting to greet old friends and meet new ones.</p>
Awards Reception and BanquetAwards Reception and Banquet25Spouses and PartnersCIC will honor leading educators and friends of private higher education at the annual Awards Reception and Banquet. Please note that banquet fees are included in Presidents Institute registration.<br> <div> <br> </div><h3>Award for Philanthropy (Individual)</h3><blockquote>Timothy H. Ubben and Sharon Williams Ubben<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Award for Philanthropy (Organization)</h3><blockquote>Raskob Foundation for Catholic Activities, Inc.<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>Allen P. Splete Award for Outstanding Service</h3><blockquote>Peter Ewell<br></blockquote><div> <br> </div><h3>CIC Lifetime Distinguished Achievement Award</h3><blockquote>Eugene M. Tobin</blockquote> <br><em>Please note: Presidents may invite special guests—such as trustees, donors, alumni, or other friends—to the Awards Reception and Banquet. Banquet charges for presidents and presidential spouses and partners who register for the Presidents Institute are included in the Institute registration fee. Separate charges for the Banquet are incurred only for invited guests. The cost is $165 per guest, with a maximum of four guests.</em>
Associated MeetingsAssociated Meetings13<strong>2:00–3:00 p.m.</strong><h3>2019 U.S.-Mexico Higher Education Summit Reunion</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Richard Ekman</em></strong>, President, CIC<br></blockquote><br><strong>3:00–5:00 p.m.</strong><h3>State Councils Advisory Committee Meeting</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Carol M. Schuler</em></strong>, Vice President for State Council Programs, CIC<br></blockquote><br><strong>4:00–5:00 p.m.</strong><h3>Harvard Institute for Higher Education Alumni and Friends Reception</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Judith Block McLaughlin</em></strong>, Director, Higher Education Program; Educational Chair, Harvard Seminar for New Presidents; and Senior Lecturer, Harvard University<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) Reception</h3><blockquote>Conveners: <strong><em>David S. Cunningham</em></strong>, Director of NetVUE, CIC, and <strong><em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, CIC</blockquote>
Workshop: Tuition Pricing Considerations—Is a Reset Right for Your Institution?Workshop: Tuition Pricing Considerations—Is a Reset Right for Your Institution?75Workshop<em><span><span></span></span><span><span><em><span><span><em>Please note that advance registration is required for all workshops, as space is limited. Spouses and partners may register on a space-available basis. Workshop fees cover materials and refreshments. To add a workshop to an already completed registration, please contact Sherita C. Ashmon, CIC conference manager, by phone at (202) 446-7230 or by email at <a href="mailto:sashmon@cic.nche.edu">sashmon@cic.nche.edu</a>.</em></span></span></em></span></span><br></em> <div> <em> </em></div><div><br></div><div>This workshop will consider various approaches to setting tuition price, including a dramatic reset. Included will be data on more than 30 colleges that have lowered their undergraduate tuition and a preview of those that have just done a reset. The session will provide the theory behind a reset to guide presidents in considering what data they should review as well as two case examples from presidents who have undertaken resets. Presidents will have the opportunity to work in small groups with sample data to assess whether or not a reset makes sense. The workshop will include steps that need to be taken and the appropriate timeframe to make the reset successful. Presenters will discuss successful marketing campaigns, assessment of the risks and rewards of a price reset, and other strategies to consider.<br></div><blockquote> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Laura Casamento</em></strong>, President, Utica College<br><strong><em>Sharon Latchaw Hirsh</em></strong>, President, Rosemont College<br><strong><em>Lucie Lapovsky</em></strong>, Principal, Lapovsky Consulting, and former President, Mercy College (NY)<br></blockquote> Fee: $50
Associated MeetingAssociated Meeting62<h3>Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Richard L. Dunsworth</em></strong>, President, University of the Ozarks<br></blockquote>
Session for Presidential Spouses and PartnersSession for Presidential Spouses and Partners27Spouses and Partners<h3>New Approaches to Personal Wellness during Difficult Times</h3>The job of a college president has always been challenging, but recent developments in higher education can mean even more stress for presidents and their spouses or partners. Tried- and-true strategies for professional wellness include carving out personal time and establishing boundaries with sufficient space for family needs. But in these difficult times, given the dynamic nature of presidential careers, greater flexibility and stamina is required. What are some approaches that presidential couples can use to adapt to new challenges, to maintain healthy relationships, and to thrive in uncertain times? Two presidential couples will share their stories of how they overcame hurdles to achieving their wellness goals.<br><blockquote><strong><em>Cindy Gnadinger</em></strong>, President, Carroll University (WI)<br><strong><em>John Gnadinger</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, Carroll University (WI)<br><strong><em>D. Mark McCoy</em></strong>, President, DePauw University<br><strong><em>Lisa McCoy</em></strong>, Presidential Spouse, DePauw University</blockquote><div class="section-parts row"><div class="col-xs-12"></div></div>
Associated MeetingsAssociated Meetings139<strong>8:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.</strong><h3>LECNA Fellows</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Thomas E. Cedel</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Concordia University Texas<br></blockquote><br><strong>8:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.</strong><h3>Lutheran Educational Conference of North America</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Michael C. Maxey</em></strong>, President, Roanoke College<br></blockquote><br><strong>8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.</strong><h3>Mennonite Higher Education Association</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Rebecca J. Stoltzfus</em></strong>, President, Goshen College<br></blockquote><br><strong>9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.</strong><h3>Association of Adventist Colleges and Universities</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Gordon Bietz</em></strong>, Director for Higher Education, North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists, and retired President, Southern Adventist University<br></blockquote><br><strong>Noon–4:00 p.m.</strong><h3>Lower Cost Models for Independent Colleges</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Michael B. Alexander</em></strong>, President, Lasell University<br></blockquote><br><strong>2:00–4:00 p.m.</strong><h3>American Baptist Churches Colleges and Universities Presidents</h3><blockquote>Conveners: <strong><em>James T. (Tim) Barry</em></strong>, President, Alderson Broaddus University, and <strong><em>Marilyn P. Turner-Triplett</em></strong>, Associate Executive Director for Missional Life and Leadership, American Baptist Home Mission Societies</blockquote>
Roman Catholic MassRoman Catholic Mass140
Ecumenical Worship ServiceEcumenical Worship Service141
All-Institute ReceptionAll-Institute Reception14Spouses and PartnersThis is an opportunity—between afternoon workshops and dinner—to connect informally with colleagues. All Institute participants as well as family members and guests are welcome.
Associated MeetingAssociated Meeting15<h3>​Associated Colleges of the South</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Stephanie Fabritius</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote>
Associated MeetingsAssociated Meetings142<div> <strong>Noon–3:00 p.m.</strong><h3>The Sun Conference Presidents Meeting</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Dustin Wilke</em></strong>, Commissioner, The Sun Conference<br></blockquote><br><strong>4:30–6:00 p.m.</strong><h3>American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI) Finance Committee Meeting</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI<br></blockquote> <br><strong></strong><strong>6:00 p.m.</strong><h3>American Academic Leadership Institute and Academic Search Board of Directors Dinner</h3><blockquote>Conveners: <strong><em>Linda M. Bleicken</em></strong>, President, AALI, and <strong><em>L. Jay Lemons</em></strong>, President, Academic Search<br></blockquote></div>
Dinner on Your OwnDinner on Your Own15Spouses and Partners​This evening provides an opportunity for presidents, spouses and partners, speakers, and sponsors to join colleagues for dinner. Participants make their own arrangements.
Welcome and Keynote Address: Nathan D. GraweWelcome and Keynote Address: Nathan D. Grawe4Nathan D. GrawePlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>Demographics, Demand, and Destiny: Implications for the Health of Independent Institutions</h3><div>Projections of the decline in the number of traditional college- age students over the next ten years concern many college and university presidents, while at the same time additional demographic challenges loom on the horizon. The U.S. birth rate has plummeted since the Great Recession, resulting in a steep decline in the number of new high school graduates beginning in 2026. The decline, however, may not affect all institutional types equally. In his recent book, <cite>Demographics and the Demand for Higher Education</cite> (2018), Nathan Grawe projected that many non-elite colleges would face significant shortages of students. Grawe developed the Higher Education Demand Index (HEDI), which forecasts college demand by institutional type and rank. How might the approaching demographic shifts affect small and mid-sized independent colleges? What strategies can institutions implement now to ensure optimal student enrollment in the future? In considering these questions, Grawe will provide fresh insights from his most recent research, soon to be published in his next book.</div><p></p>
Plenary Session: Jonathan McBridePlenary Session: Jonathan McBride17Jonathan McBridePlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>The Future of Work: Preparing Graduates for Diverse, Purpose-Driven Workplaces</h3><div>How might an education rooted in the liberal arts provide effective preparation for employment in the new economy? What can independent colleges do to improve the career-readiness of their graduates? How can the role of mission in higher education align with a sense of purpose in today’s workplace? And how can presidents cultivate diverse and inclusive campus communities and ensure that their students graduate with the capabilities to serve in wide-ranging workplaces and fulfill the leadership needs of the nation and the world? Drawing on his own liberal arts education and on keen insights from his experiences working in the White House and in the c-suites of a number of successful corporations, Jonathan McBride will guide college presidents in considering how to prepare graduates for diverse, purpose-driven workplaces.<br></div>
Meetings of CIC State Council Member OrganizationsMeetings of CIC State Council Member Organizations19<h3>Associated Colleges of Illinois</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Jamel Santa Cruze Wright</em></strong>, President, Eureka College<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Ray Martinez III</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Independent Colleges of Indiana</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>David W. Wantz</em></strong>, President and Chief Executive Officer<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Independent Colleges of Washington</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Terri Standish-Kuon</em></strong>, President and CEO<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Michigan Colleges Alliance</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Robert P. Bartlett</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>A. Hope Williams</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Ohio Foundation of Independent Colleges</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>William J. Spiker</em></strong>, President<br></blockquote><div><br></div><h3>Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities</h3><blockquote>Convener: <strong><em>Rolf Wegenke</em></strong>, President</blockquote>
Workshop: Change, Risk, and Relevance—New Lessons from Thriving InstitutionsWorkshop: Change, Risk, and Relevance—New Lessons from Thriving Institutions12Workshop <em><span><span><em></em></span></span><span><span><em>Please note that advance registration is required for all workshops, as space is limited. Spouses and partners may register on a space-available basis. Workshop fees cover materials and refreshments. To add a workshop to an already completed registration, please contact Sherita C. Ashmon, CIC conference manager, by phone at (202) 446-7230 or by email at <a href="mailto:sashmon@cic.nche.edu">sashmon@cic.nche.edu</a>.</em></span></span><br></em> <div> <em> <br></em></div><div> <em></em>Colleges and universities continue to be asked to respond to seismic shifts in our culture, society, and economy that bring into question many of higher education’s long-standing practices. Leaders from across the institutional spectrum are taking a deep dive from positions of strength to positions of dire challenge into institutional re-investment and re-invention, building their futures around a set of mission-rooted commitments. How can these colleges and universities exceed expected measures of success and provide a transformational experience for students and employees? How are some campuses thriving in distinctive ways? Eight critical elements, identified through ongoing research and refined over time, contribute to institutional success. This session will draw on case studies of presidents who exercised bold vision in areas such as strategic thinking and action, partnerships and collaboration, teaching and learning, and leadership structure and engagement.</div><blockquote> <strong><em></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Mary Schmidt Campbell</em></strong>, President, Spelman College <br> <strong> <em>Travis Feezell</em></strong>, President, Hastings College <br> <strong> <em>Emma Jones</em></strong>, Chief Brand Officer and Owner, Credo<br><strong><em>Joretta S. Nelson</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Owner, Credo<br><strong><em>Kim S. Phipps</em></strong>, President, Messiah College<br></blockquote> Fee: $50
Closing Plenary Session: James M. Dennis, Mary Dana Hinton, Lawrence M. Schall, and Marjorie HassClosing Plenary Session: James M. Dennis, Mary Dana Hinton, Lawrence M. Schall, and Marjorie Hass28James M. Dennis; Mary Dana Hinton; Lawrence M. Schall; Marjorie HassPlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>Presidential Leadership for Healthy Institutions</h3><div>Maintaining healthy, vibrant institutions has long been a trait of effective presidential leadership. Small and mid-sized independent colleges and universities are places where transformational change of the institution is genuinely possible. Maintaining enrollment in the midst of dramatic demographic shifts, preparing students with the skills for employment success in the 21st-century economy, and adapting college business models to new realities are just some of the challenges presidents face today. How can presidents lead institutions along sustainable paths amid these unprecedented challenges? What are the characteristics of institutional health and effective presidential leadership? A distinguished panel of experienced CIC presidents will candidly discuss their approaches to leading healthy institutions—including what has worked and what has not. This moderated conversation will provide an opportunity for other presidential colleagues to offer their insights and raise additional questions for consideration.<br></div>
Workshop: Owning Your Future—Transforming Your Institution by Playing to StrengthsWorkshop: Owning Your Future—Transforming Your Institution by Playing to Strengths75Workshop <em><span><span><em></em></span></span><span><span><em>Please note that advance registration is required for all workshops, as space is limited. Spouses and partners may register on a space-available basis. Workshop fees cover materials and refreshments. To add a workshop to an already completed registration, please contact Sherita C. Ashmon, CIC conference manager, by phone at (202) 446-7230 or by email at <a href="mailto:sashmon@cic.nche.edu">sashmon@cic.nche.edu</a>.</em></span></span><br></em> <div> <em><br></em></div><div> <em></em>Transformative change requires an intentional approach and creative thinking. This workshop will highlight successful initiatives, introduce effective tools and frameworks, and generate ideas to help presidents consider new approaches to transformative innovation at their institutions. Institutional case studies will provide examples of lessons learned and successful approaches. Workshop leaders will introduce strategic concepts that are designed to help institutions optimize their current strengths while establishing a structure for strategic actions that will enable the institutions to thrive in the future. In small groups, participants will work together to discuss their college or university in the context of future scenarios—such as shifting student demographics, emerging technologies, and changing regulatory and funding environments. Participants also will prepare for core activities—such as program offerings, operations, and market-positioning—to become more relevant, competitive, and efficient.<br></div><blockquote> <strong><em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em></em></strong> <strong> <em>Martha A. Burger</em></strong>, President, Oklahoma City University<br><strong><em>Helen G. Drinan</em></strong>, President, Simmons University<br><strong><em>Dennis Hanno</em></strong>, President, Wheaton College (MA)<br><strong><em>Peter Stokes</em></strong>, Managing Director, Higher Education, Huron<br></blockquote> Fee: $50
Plenary Session: Mariët WestermannPlenary Session: Mariët Westermann7Mariët WestermannPlenary Session;Spouses and Partners<h3>International Education in an Age of Closing Borders: Why and How</h3><p>Facilitating international experience for students and faculty members remains a goal of most independent colleges and universities, but determining the most effective international strategy is complicated by declining international enrollments, mounting visa hurdles, increasing nationalist sentiments, intractable financial obstacles, and understandable first-job orientation of students and parents. How can institutions of higher education optimize opportunities for learning and research in global frameworks? Should they prioritize an international curriculum at home? How can a student’s educational trajectory be sustained and enhanced during a semester or shorter stint abroad? What are the pros and cons of satellite campuses or programs? And how can opportunities beyond popular Western European destinations be scaled? Mariët Westermann, the head of a leading global campus of New York University that also is a university in its own right, and a long-time champion of the humanities and the liberal arts, will offer guidance for presidents of independent colleges.<br></p>