New Realities, New Solutions

2016 Institute for Chief Academic Officers 11/4/201611/4/201611/4/201611/7/201611/7/201611/7/2016 Hyatt Regency New Orleans Hotel New Orleans, LA
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About the Institute

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The 2016 Institute for Chief Academic Officers will focus on changes in the core responsibilities of the chief academic officer and strategies to sustain strong academic leadership. For the institution to succeed, the entire academic leadership team must be seamlessly inte​​​​​​​grated and committed to the college or university’s distinctive mission. Associate provosts and assistant academic vice presidents who understand the wider vision for the campus can assume new responsibilities and be tenacious in pursuit of both their goals for specific domains and broader institutional responsibilities.

The challenges that academic administrators face today include stresses on shared governance, expanded definitions of faculty work, public challenges to free speech inside and outside the classroom, relentless pressure from social media to respond to campus events rapidly and publicly, unsustainable financial models, campus cultures that are not as diverse or inclusive as desired, and the need to take prompt action to address incidents of sexual assault. The theme of the 2016 Institute, “New Realities, New Solutions,” provides a framework for both deliberation and action on these and other pressing issues and for candid sharing of both successes and persistent challenges. Institute sessions will provide advice and concrete examples for CAOs and their teams to consider on such topics as diversity and inclusion on campus, interactions with students on social media, and fostering students’ progress toward degrees. Other sessions will explore additional areas of institutional leadership that CAOs and their teams often address together, including institution-wide changes, making the most of limited resources, and working within shared governance.

The 2016 Institute also offers opportunities to learn how to analyze faculty workload more effectively, utilize nontraditional faculty contracts, and support contingent faculty. Concurrent sessions will feature practical advice on revising and assessing the core curriculum, motivating underperforming faculty, and integrating professional and liberal arts curricula. Sessions on shared governance will provide fresh perspectives on academic infrastructure, the CAO’s role in faculty governance, and faculty evaluation rubrics. Chief academic officers and other academic administrators also will have opportunities to discuss leadership development for faculty members and mid-level academic administrators.

The 2016 Institute for Chief Academic Officers is intended to help participants develop the shared vision, collaborative spirit, and effective partnerships that are essential elements to move institutions toward successful innovation. Perhaps most importantly, the Institute offers opportunities for chief academic officers and their academic teams to share—with candor—ideas, practical solutions, and effective practices with colleagues from across the country and abroad.

Who Should Participate?

CIC invites chief academic officers (who may hold the title of provost, vice president for academic affairs, or dean of the college, among others) of all independent colleges and universities to participate in this annual Institute. Chief academic officers are encouraged to invite members of their academic leadership team—for example, associate and assistant provosts, associate and assistant vice presidents, or academic deans—to participate with them in the Institute to enhance collaborative work in academic affairs. Experienced chief academic officers will be presenters in most of the concurrent sessions, together with other experts.

To support team development, CIC offers a discounted registration fee for additional administrators from the same institution.

Featured Speakers

 

 

  • Katherine W. Phillips
    Katherine W. Phillips
    Columbia University Business School
  • Jeff Selingo
    Jeff Selingo
    Washington Post; Arizona State University
  • Beverly Daniel Tatum
    Beverly Daniel Tatum
    Spelman College
  • Carl E. Wieman
    Carl E. Wieman
    Stanford University

Schedule

​​​View additional information about the Spouses and Partners Program.

 

 

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Consultations with TIAA: Planning for Your RetirementConsultations with TIAA: Planning for Your Retirement10 <div>TIAA counselors will be available for personal consultations with Institute participants for one-hour sessions during the conference. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk to discuss personal financial planning for retirement.</div>
Institute Registration and Idea ExchangeInstitute Registration and Idea Exchange1
Ecumenical Worship ServiceEcumenical Worship Service11Mary Jones<p>​A Christian ecumenical worship service will be held on Sunday, November 6, 8:00–8:30 a.m., led by <strong><em>Mary Jones</em></strong>, provost and chief academic officer, MidAmerica Nazarene University.</p>
Roman Catholic MassRoman Catholic Mass11<p>​Catholic Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, November 6, 8:00–8:30 a.m.</p>
Plenary Session: "‘Why Are All the Black Kids Still Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?’ and Other Campus Conversations about Race"Plenary Session: "‘Why Are All the Black Kids Still Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?’ and Other Campus Conversations about Race"12Beverly Daniel TatumPlenary Session<p></p><span style="color:#282828;">In the current cultural and political climate on many college and university campuses, it is critical for administrators to understand how the developing racial identity of a student may influence academic performance, mental health, and feelings of inclusion. <strong><em>Beverly Daniel Tatum</em></strong> will address how to help all students, faculty members, and administrators understand the pivotal role that race and the development of racial identity play in students’ lives. How can we hold meaningful conversations on campus about race and racism without becoming overwhelmed by anger, guilt, shame, and despair? How can we help students frame their experiences and the experiences of others in ways that lead to positive change?</span>
Welcome Coffee for CAO Spouses and PartnersWelcome Coffee for CAO Spouses and Partners13Diane T. AquilaSpouses and Partners<p>​<strong><em>Diane T. Aquila</em></strong>, Chief Academic Officer Spouse, University of St. Thomas (TX)</p>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions13Concurrent Session<h2>Follow-up: “Why Are All the Black Kids Still Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?” and Other Campus Conversations about Race</h2><div>Participants will meet informally with Beverly Daniel Tatum to discuss further the ideas offered in her plenary address.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Beverly Daniel Tatum</em></strong>, President Emerita, Spelman College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Andrew Workman</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Roger Williams University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Successful Leadership in Challenging Times: Perspectives from the Field</h2><div>What qualities make a successful campus leader? Why do some step up and perform at their best in challenging times and others waste time and resources spinning their wheels? What “hard” and “soft” aspects of leadership are most effective when it matters most? What clues about future leadership performance do experienced search committee members extract from the résumés, cover letters, and responses from references? A seasoned search consultant will address these questions for participants who are evaluating candidates as well as those who are applying for new positions.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Andrea Warren Hamos</em></strong>, Vice President and Senior Consultant, Academic Search, Inc.</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Dominic A. Aquila</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of St. Thomas (TX)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>The Changing Role of the Chief Academic Officer</h2><div>The role of the chief academic officer has evolved over the last two decades to include, frequently, responsibility for institutional strategy and communications—in addition to the traditional duties of “chief educator,” planning and launching new programs, and closing ineffective programs. How well have CAOs adapted to these added responsibilities? How have they implemented necessary changes on campus? Which constituencies are the most important to enlist in order to assure successful change? Panelists will present practical advice on change management.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Katie Conboy</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Simmons College</div><div><strong><em>David W. Strauss</em></strong>, Principal, Art & Science Group</div><div><strong><em>Adam Weinberg</em></strong>, President, Denison University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Jeff Gingerich</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Cabrini University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>The Long-Term Impact of Liberal Arts Education: Findings from the GLCA Alumni Study</h2><div>What difference does a liberal arts education make in the ways alumni live their lives two, three, even four decades after graduation? Results of a new study based on 1,000 in-depth interviews provide compelling evidence that independent college graduates are more likely to be deeply engaged in their communities and view their lives as meaningful. Panelists will discuss the significance of the findings in the context of other research and will offer examples of educational practices that yield superior outcomes.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Ron Cole</em></strong>, Provost and Dean, Allegheny College</div><div><strong><em>Richard A. Detweiler</em></strong>, President, Great Lakes Colleges Association</div><div><strong><em>Joseph L. Klesner</em></strong>, Provost, Kenyon College</div><div><strong><em>Carolyn R. Newton</em></strong>, Provost, The College of Wooster</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Irma Becerra</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, St. Thomas University (FL)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Title IX: Compliance and Best Practices</h2><div>Title IX concerns of colleges and universities have expanded from equal opportunities for male and female students in intercollegiate athletics to equal educational experiences, including freedom from sexual harassment for both men and women. Which Title IX educational initiatives have worked? Which sexual harassment avoidance trainings have proven effective? What kinds of investigations meet compliance requirements? The session will include a Title IX update on handling sexual assault cases, gender equity in programming, and transgender issues on campus.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Partner, Hirschfeld Kraemer LLP</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Daniel J. Blankenship</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Eureka College</div></blockquote><em></em>
Free Time for LunchFree Time for Lunch14Spouses and Partners
Women’s Luncheon and Discussion Groups for CAOs and Academic Team MembersWomen’s Luncheon and Discussion Groups for CAOs and Academic Team Members15Susan Agre-Kippenhan, Lauren BowenSpouses and Partners<p>​Women CAOs and academic team members are invited to join discussion groups on current issues led by colleagues who have been selected for their expertise on the topic.</p><blockquote><div><strong><em>Susan Agre-Kippenhan</em></strong>, vice president for academic affairs and dean of faculty, Linfield College, and <strong><em>Lauren Bowen</em></strong>, provost, Juniata College, will coordinate the luncheon discussions. Suggestions for luncheon topics or offers to assist with the program should be directed to Agre-Kippenhan at (503) 883-2270 or <a href="mailto:susanak@linfield.edu">susanak@linfield.edu</a>, or Bowen at (814) 641-3123 or <a href="mailto:bowenl@juniata.edu">bowenl@juniata.edu</a>.</div></blockquote><div><em>Fee: early rate $60 (by September 6); regular rate $75 (after September 6) Note: This event requires pre-registration, as space is limited.</em></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions16Concurrent Session<h2>Employment Law Update</h2><div>An experienced higher education attorney will offer updates on overtime pay for some faculty and staff members under the new Fair Labor Standards Act rules and the movement to unionize contingent and full-time faculty members. Issues that remain important to contingent faculty members—compensation; benefits; evaluation; institutional support for teaching, scholarship, and research; and participation in institutional governance—pose challenges for colleges, unionized or not. How can recruitment, appointment, and orientation of contingent faculty members be improved both to help the faculty members and to protect the interests of the institution?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Natasha J. Baker</em></strong>, Partner, Hirschfeld Kramer, LLP</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Brent Yoder</em></strong>, Vice President of Academics, Hesston College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Evaluation of Digital Scholarship in Tenure and Promotion Reviews</h2><div>As more faculty members in the arts and humanities explore digital media in their scholarship and teaching, academic departments are grappling with how to appraise this kind of work for tenure and promotion decisions. Learned societies and professional associations have developed guidelines for the evaluation of this work; some have assembled lists of qualified peer reviewers who can help departments and institutions establish new processes for the evaluation of digital scholarship and teaching materials. What are the biggest challenges facing tenure and promotion committees as they wrestle with new scholarly formats? How can faculty members present their digital work most effectively for evaluation?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Seth Denbo</em></strong>, Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives, American Historical Association</div><div><strong><em>Carl A. Girelli</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Randolph College</div><div><strong><em>R. Scott Sheffield</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Brevard College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Sally Selden</em></strong>, Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs, Lynchburg College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Organizational Structures for Academic Administration</h2><div>Which organizational structures facilitate the work of faculty members and administrators in different institutional settings? Are department chairs and deans necessary for a college or university to function at peak efficiency? What are the advantages of a divisional structure? How are the areas of responsibility best assigned within the academic affairs office? Several chief academic officers will present structures currently in use and lead a discussion of experiences and consideration of alternatives.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Michael Nastanski</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Saint Leo University</div><div><strong><em>D. Nathan Phinney</em></strong>, Provost, Malone University</div><div><strong><em>Linda Samek</em></strong>, Provost, George Fox University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Gayle Copeland</em></strong>, Provost, Simpson University (CA)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>The State of Online Programs at CIC Member Institutions</h2><div>CIC partnered with The Learning House, Inc. earlier this year to survey CAOs regarding current practices and future plans for online programs at their institutions. Follow-up interviews also were conducted with select CAOs. Results from this study will be compared with those from a survey conducted in 2013. The main trends are that the share of institutions offering five or more online programs has increased from 15 percent to 25 percent and that 85 percent plan to increase their online offerings. Panelists will discuss faculty preparation and training efforts, barriers to offering online education, and broader institutional impacts of becoming an online program provider as a CIC institution.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>GianMario Besana</em></strong>, Associate Provost for Global Engagement and Online Learning, DePaul University</div><div><strong><em>David Clinefelter</em></strong>, Chief Academic Officer, The Learning House, Inc.</div><div><strong><em>Gregg Cox</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lynn University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Robert D. Haak</em></strong>, Vice President and Dean of the College, Hiram College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>The Yale National Initiative to Strengthen Teaching in Public Schools</h2><div>The Yale National Initiative to strengthen teaching in public schools, established in 2004 by the Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute, is a long-term endeavor to influence teacher professional development, in part by establishing exemplary Teachers Institutes for high-need schools in states around the country. Teachers Institutes are educational partnerships between colleges and universities and local school districts designed to strengthen teaching and learning in a community’s high-need public schools. The Institute approach exhibits the characteristics of high-quality teacher professional development, enhances teacher quality in the ways known to improve student achievement, and encourages participants to remain as teachers in their high-need schools. Learn how your college or university can be an anchor for local public schools, based on this model. A representative from the Institute will describe opportunities to become involved with the National Initiative and will lead a discussion on other promising ways to strengthen teaching and learning in high-need public schools across the country.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Judith A. Muyskens</em></strong>, Provost, Nebraska Wesleyan University</div><div><strong><em>John A. Roush</em></strong>, President, Centre College</div><div><strong><em>James R. Vivian</em></strong>, Director, Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Agnes I. Caldwell</em></strong>, Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs, Adrian College</div></blockquote>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions17Concurrent Session<h2>Alternative Calendar Models</h2><div>The typical college semester is 14 to 16 weeks long, with classes on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday or Tuesday and Thursday, and students are enrolled in four to six courses at a time. What are other models for the academic calendar? How does the structure of the calendar impact student learning and enrollment patterns? Does an alternative calendar encourage students—and faculty members—to be more experimental and take more academic risks? Alternative calendar models, such as a one-course-at-a-time model, a short semesters model (three courses at a time followed by a one-month one-course term), and others will be described and discussed.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Susan Agre-Kippenhan</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty, Linfield College</div><div><strong><em>Diane Fladeland</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Mary (ND)</div><div><strong><em>Lisa Johnson</em></strong>, Associate Vice President for Student Engagement and Achievement, Tusculum College</div><div><strong><em>Daniel Silber</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Culver-Stockton College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Cesar Fermin</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Tuskegee University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Honors Programs at CIC Member Institutions: A Competitive Advantage?</h2><div>What is the impact of having honors programs at small to mid-sized independent colleges and universities? Are honors programs attractive to talented prospective students and their parents? Do they enrich the intellectual climate and enhance the college experience without isolating program students from their peers?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Richard Badenhausen</em></strong>, Professor and Director of the Honors Program, Westminster College (UT)</div><div><strong><em>Jeff Frick</em></strong>, Dean of the College and Academic Vice President, St. Norbert College</div><div><strong><em>Marc Manganaro</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Loyola University New Orleans</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Susan Burns</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Clarke University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>International Students and Two-Year College Partners</h2><div>American Honors, a selective honors program offered at community colleges in Indiana, Michigan, New Jersey, Texas, and Washington for students who intend to earn a bachelor’s degree, has recently expanded its recruitment of international students. International students screened and selected as the most likely to be successful spend two years at a partner community college, then transfer to a four-year institution, where many of them pay full tuition. A representative of American Honors and CAOs from partner colleges and universities will discuss the program and its benefits.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Benjamin Moritz</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, American Honors</div><div><strong><em>Caroline Simon</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University</div><div><strong><em>Jenna Templeton</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chatham University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Michael Selmon</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Alma College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Securing America’s Future: Report on Workshops for College and University Leaders</h2><div>Is the future of your institution secure? CIC member presidents report that institutional viability is a pressing concern at independent colleges and universities that face shifting demographics and economic uncertainty.</div><div>This fall, CIC launched a series of free workshops designed to help member colleges and universities prepare for the future more effectively. The half-day workshops, scheduled around the country between September 2016 and April 2017, bring together teams of presidents, senior administrators, and faculty leaders to explore key trends in higher education and society, the urgent pressures facing individual colleges and universities, and potential solutions. Panelists will report on discussion outcomes to date and lead a discussion of key higher education trends.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Walter M. Kimbrough</em></strong>, President, Dillard University</div><div><strong><em>S. Georgia Nugent</em></strong>, Senior Fellow, CIC</div><div><strong><em>Beth M. Schwartz</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Heidelberg University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Eric Bolger</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, College of the Ozarks (MO)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>The Role of Academic Rigor in College Students’ Persistence</h2><div>Students who are actively engaged in both coursework and campus activities are more likely to graduate. What role does the academic rigor of the institution play in student engagement and persistence? In a recent study of first-time, full-time undergraduate students at private, residential colleges and universities, John Braxton and Clay Francis of Vanderbilt University found that students who experience rigorous exams in their courses view many aspects of their college experience more positively than students who experience superficial exams. This positive view contributes to a greater likelihood of persistence to the second year. Braxton and two CAOs will discuss how CAOs can encourage faculty members to facilitate the retention of students through in-depth testing in combination with a support system for students.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Laura L. Behling</em></strong>, Dean of the College and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Knox College</div><div><strong><em>John M. Braxton</em></strong>, Professor of Higher Education, Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University</div><div><strong><em>Gene C. Fant</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Palm Beach Atlantic University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>DonnaJean Fredeen</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Rider University</div></blockquote>
Workshop for New Chief Academic OfficersWorkshop for New Chief Academic Officers2Workshop<em>​Please pre-register for this event, as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute registration, please call the CIC office at (202) 466-7230.</em><br><br><div><span class="sponsors--ital"><em>Sponsored by Jenzabar</em></span><span style="display:inline-block;"></span></div><h4 class="ms-rteElement-H4"><span></span><br><span></span></h4><div><em></em><em></em><span></span><strong>7:30 a.m.</strong></div><h2>Continental Breakfast</h2><div> </div><div><strong>8:00–8:05 a.m.</strong></div><h2>Welcome</h2><blockquote><div><strong><em>Kathy Whatley</em></strong>, Vice President for Annual Programs, CIC</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>8:05–8:45 a.m.</strong></div><h2>Introductions, New CAO Workshop Coordinators</h2><blockquote><div>Coordinators:</div><div><strong><em>Kerry D. Fulcher</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Point Loma Nazarene University</div><div><strong><em>Lily D. McNair</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Wagner College</div><div><strong><em>Caroline J. Simon</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice President, Whitworth University</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>8:45–10:00 a.m.</strong></div><h2>Developing Professional Relationships to Meet New Expectations</h2><blockquote><div><strong><em>Cynthia Zane</em></strong>, President, Hilbert College</div><div>Moderator: <strong><em>Kerry Fulcher</em></strong></div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>10:00–10:15 a.m.</strong></div><h2>Break</h2><div> </div><div><strong>10:15 a.m.–Noon</strong></div><h2>Case Studies</h2><blockquote><div>Moderator: <strong><em>Carol Simon</em></strong></div><div><strong><em>Dominic A. Aquila</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of St. Thomas (TX)</div><div><strong><em>Allen Bedford</em></strong>, Dean of Academics and Faculty, Bryn Athyn College</div><div><strong><em>Leanne M. Neilson</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California Lutheran University</div><div><strong><em>Yolanda Williams Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University</div><div><strong><em>Wayne Powel</em></strong>, Provost, Saint Francis University (PA)</div><div><strong><em>Amy Wolfson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Loyola University Maryland</div><div><strong><em>Andrew Workman</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Roger Williams University</div><div><strong><em>Daniel A. Wubah</em></strong>, Provost, Washington and Lee University</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>12:15–1:15 p.m.</strong></div><h2>Lunch</h2><div> </div><div><strong>1:15–1:30 p.m.</strong></div><h2>How CIC Supports CAOs</h2><blockquote><div><strong><em>Richard Ekman</em></strong>, President, CIC</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>1:30–3:00 p.m.</strong></div><h2>Roundtable Discussions</h2><blockquote><div>Moderator: <strong><em>Lily McNair</em></strong></div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Accreditation, Assessment, and Institutional Effectiveness</div><div><strong><em>Darin Fields</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The University of Findlay</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Crisis and Risk Management on Campus</div><div><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Diversity and Inclusion on Campus: Faculty, Curriculum, and Student Life</div><div><strong><em>Helen J. D. Whippy</em></strong>, Provost, Chaminade University of Honolulu</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Faculty Governance and Faculty Leadership</div><div><strong><em>Chad Berry</em></strong>, Academic Vice President and Dean of the Faculty, Berea College</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Student Retention and Success</div><div><strong><em>Dean A. Pribbenow</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, Edgewood College</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Working with Fellow Cabinet Officers</div><div><strong><em>Michael Selmon</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Alma College</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Working with Student Leaders and Activists</div><div><strong><em>Amy Wolfson</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Loyola University Maryland</div><div> </div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Work-Life Integration</div><div><strong><em>Janet R. Clark</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>3:00–3:15 p.m.</strong></div><h2>Refreshment Break</h2><div> </div><div><strong>3:15–3:50 p.m.</strong></div><h2>Panel: Group Questions and Answers</h2><blockquote><div><strong><em>Kerry Fulcher</em></strong>, Lily McNair, and Carol Simon</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>3:50–4:00 p.m.</strong></div><h2>Reflection: What Will I Take Back to Campus?</h2><blockquote><div>Moderator: <strong><em>Kerry Fulcher</em></strong></div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>4:00–4:30 p.m.</strong></div><h2>Mentors Meet New CAOs</h2><blockquote><div>Mentor Coordinators:</div><div><strong><em>Karen Kaivola</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Augsburg College</div><div><strong><em>Joseph Ritter</em></strong>, Chief Academic Officer, Principia College</div><div> </div><div>Mentors:</div><div><strong><em>Dominic A. Aquila</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of St. Thomas (TX)</div><div><strong><em>Allen Bedford</em></strong>, Dean of Academics and Faculty, Bryn Athyn College</div><div><strong><em>Laura Behling</em></strong>, Dean of the College and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Knox College</div><div><strong><em>Susan Burns</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Clarke University</div><div><strong><em>Philip Acree Cavalier</em></strong>, Provost, Lyon College</div><div><strong><em>Brian Ernsting</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Wartburg College</div><div><strong><em>Darin Fields</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The University of Findlay</div><div><strong><em>Jeff Frick</em></strong>, Dean of the College and Academic Vice President, St. Norbert College</div><div><strong><em>Carl A. Girelli</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Randolph College</div><div><strong><em>Bryan F. Le Beau</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Saint Mary</div><div><strong><em>Linda McMillin</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Susquehanna University</div><div><strong><em>Kathryn Morris</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Butler University</div><div><strong><em>Melissa Morriss-Olson</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Bay Path University</div><div><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College</div><div><strong><em>Yolanda Page</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dillard University</div><div><strong><em>Tracy S. Parkinson</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs, Coker College</div><div><strong><em>Wayne Powel</em></strong>, Provost, Saint Francis University (PA)</div><div><strong><em>Perry Rettig</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Piedmont College</div><div><strong><em>Jenifer Ward</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Centenary College of Louisiana</div><div><strong><em>Helen J. D. Whippy</em></strong>, Provost, Chaminade University of Honolulu</div><div><strong><em>Jane M. Wood</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Mount Marty College</div></blockquote><div> </div><div><strong>4:30 p.m.</strong></div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading"><h2>Workshop for New CAOs Adjourns</h2><em></em></div>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions18Concurrent Session<span></span><h2>CIC’s Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Program</h2><div>For more than 40 years, the Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows program has brought prominent artists, diplomats, journalists, business leaders, and other nonacademic professionals to campuses across the United States for substantive dialogue with students and faculty members. Through a week-long residential program of classes, seminars, workshops, lectures, and informal discussions, the Fellows create better understanding and new connections between the academic and nonacademic worlds. The director of the program and CAOs from campuses that have hosted Fellows’ residencies will discuss the diverse roster of Fellows available, best practices for engaging the entire campus community in the visit, application procedures and visit fees, and how to bring a Fellow to your campus this academic year.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Roger Bowen</em></strong>, Director, Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Program, and Senior Advisor, CIC</div><div><strong><em>Darin E. Fields</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The University of Findlay</div><div><strong><em>David Garcia</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Carthage College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Laura Bryan</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the University, Transylvania University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>High-Impact Practices and Academic Libraries</h2><div>CIC member institutions are committed to offering programming, resources, and services that are student-focused and incorporate high-impact practices (HIPs)—transformative experiences that require students to connect, reflect on, and integrate what they are learning from their classes with other life experiences. HIPs have been shown to contribute to student engagement and success, and they align with the experiences that employers value when hiring college graduates. Academic libraries, key contributors to student success, are actively engaged in high-impact practices. A college library director will share strategies for fostering high-impact practices both within the library and across campus.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Lisabeth Chabot</em></strong>, College Librarian, Ithaca College, and CIC Liaison, Association of College and Research Libraries</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Dennis G. Carroll</em></strong>, Provost, High Point University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Why New Orleans Matters</h2><div>Straddling a mighty river, New Orleans is the quintessential anti-Las Vegas—what happened here didn’t stay here. It rippled across the United States, enriching culture and channeling powerful currents of racial justice. The history of New Orleans, a city that has lived under six flags, is grounded in geography and hydrology (it is not easy in these parts to distinguish where land ends and water begins). Why was New Orleans one of North America’s first melting-pot cities? Why did traditional jazz originate here, later irrigating popular and classical music across the globe? Why did New Orleans’s Caribbean pattern of race relations have profound consequences for the constitutional struggle for equal citizenship? How and why did New Orleans indirectly give rise to the modern welfare state (through the city’s impact on Huey Long and, through him, on President Franklin Roosevelt)?</div><div> </div><div>Hurricane Katrina gave New Orleanians and the world a renewed appreciation for the city’s special history, a realization that has supplied much of the resilience that has fueled recovery from that cataclysmic event. New Orleans has a future because its history has been worth preserving.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Lawrence N. Powell</em></strong>, James H. Clark Endowed Chair in American Civilization Emeritus, Department of History, Tulane University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Andrew Workman</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President, Roger Williams University</div></blockquote>
Mentor Program for New CAOs: Follow-upMentor Program for New CAOs: Follow-up18
Reception for Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership AcademyReception for Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy19Thomas R. Kepple, Jr.<p>​Alumni of CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy are invited to gather for light refreshments and conversation.</p><blockquote><div>Convener: <strong><em>Thomas R. Kepple, Jr.</em></strong>, President, American Academic Leadership Institute</div></blockquote>
Reception for Alumni of CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission ProgramReception for Alumni of CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission Program19Harold V. Hartley III<p>​Alumni of and participants in CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission program are invited to gather for light refreshments and conversation.</p><blockquote><div>Convener: <strong><em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, Council of Independent Colleges</div></blockquote>
Dine-around DinnersDine-around Dinners20<p>​To meet and exchange ideas with colleagues from other campuses, participants can sign up at the CIC Registration Desk onsite for informal dinners at restaurants in New Orleans. Participants pay for their meals. Each group of chief academic officers is guided by a CAO Task Force member to the area restaurant for which they registered. Spouses and partners are welcome.</p>
Institute Registration and Idea ExchangeInstitute Registration and Idea Exchange21
Breakfast DiscussionsBreakfast Discussions22<p></p><div><div class="ms-rteElement-CICBlueHeading">Aligning Vocation and Mission for Aspiring Presidents</div><div>CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission program is designed for chief academic and chief advancement officers as well as other senior administrators—and their spouses or partners—who are considering whether to seek a college presidency. The program helps participants clarify their own sense of calling, the significance of the mission of the institution they might lead, and how alignment between personal vocation and institutional mission fosters effective presidential leadership. In this session participants will learn more about the structure of the seminars and the nomination process for the 2017–2018 program.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Harold V. Hartley III</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, CIC</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Assessing General Education Outcomes at Graduation</h2><div>How do CIC colleges and universities assess broad-based skills such as critical thinking, written and oral communication, and information literacy that are developed through their general education programs? Participants will learn about Rosemont College’s model for assessing outcomes for graduating seniors and will share general education assessment practices from their own campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>B. Christopher Dougherty</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs, Rosemont College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Bringing Outstanding Leaders to Campus: The Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Program</h2><div>The CIC Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Program allows colleges and universities to bring dynamic and engaging professionals to campus for an entire week of affordable community-wide programs. Participants will hear about the diverse roster of Fellows available, best practices for engaging the entire campus community in the visit, application procedures and visit fees, and how to bring a Fellow to your campus this academic year.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Roger Bowen</em></strong>, Director, Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Program, and Senior Advisor, CIC</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Celebrating Faculty Success</h2><div>How do CIC institutions ensure that faculty members are recognized for their accomplishments in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service? Participants are invited to share information about campus events, communication strategies, awards, and other institutional practices that celebrate faculty members’ achievements.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Gerard O’Sullivan</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Saint Peter’s University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>CIC’s Leadership Programs: Senior Leadership Academy and Executive Leadership Academy</h2><div>Learn about CIC’s year-long leadership programs, Senior Leadership Academy (SLA) and Executive Leadership Academy (ELA). The SLA prepares mid-level administrators for vice presidencies in independent higher education; the ELA prepares college and university vice presidents for presidencies.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Thomas R. Kepple, Jr.</em></strong>, President, American Academic Leadership Institute</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Developing a Collaborative Academic Leadership Team</h2><div>How can chief academic officers cultivate and sustain effective academic leadership teams? This discussion will explore both the barriers and the enablers to developing a culture of collaboration within academic affairs.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Irma Becerra</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, St. Thomas University (FL)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives That Reshape Campus Culture</h2><div>What kinds of diversity and inclusion initiatives are taking place on CIC member campuses? What are the main challenges to making progress? Participants will discuss how to get started and maintain momentum as well as how innovative programs and practices have led to meaningful change.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Brian Ernsting</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Wartburg College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Enrollment Capacity in Academic Programs</h2><div>How do CIC institutions determine the enrollment capacity of academic programs or departments? The facilitators will describe their work to develop models and methods for Bryn Athyn College and Cornell College. Participants will give feedback and share other approaches from their campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Allen J. Bedford</em></strong>, Dean of Academics, Bryn Athyn College</div><div><strong><em>R. Joseph Dieker</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Cornell College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Getting on the Same Page: How to Make Faculty Handbook Revision a Success</h2><div>This discussion will focus on the challenges and opportunities in revising faculty handbooks. What are the roles of faculty members, deans, and the chief academic officer in decision making during the revision process? How do academic programs with specialized accreditation influence the handbook’s content? How can the chief academic officer work with faculty groups to ensure a transparent process from beginning to end? </div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Sherry Fraser</em></strong>, Provost, Concordia College New York</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Making Connections to Your Students’ Cultures</h2><div>Academic leaders from CIC institutions that serve culturally specific populations of students as well as other participants who want to improve the teaching and learning experience for students on their campuses are invited to discuss their programs, practices, and partnerships to support students in and out of the classroom.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Helen J. D. Whippy</em></strong>, Provost, Chaminade University of Hawaii</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Navigating the Retention Vortex of Late Registration</h2><div>What are effective intervention strategies to encourage currently enrolled students to register for subsequent semesters in a timely manner? Participants will learn about the collaborative, institution-wide approach that Piedmont College has implemented with positive results and will share successful practices used on their own campuses. </div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Perry R. Rettig</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Piedmont College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>New CAO Workshop: Continuing the Conversation</h2><div>New chief academic officers who participated in the earlier New CAO Workshop will have an additional opportunity to discuss conference sessions, general concerns, and new ideas.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Kerry Dwayne Fulcher</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Point Loma Nazarene University</div><div><strong><em>Lily D. McNair</em></strong>, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Wagner College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Orienting New Faculty Members to Institutional Mission</h2><div>How do CIC colleges and universities incorporate information about institutional mission, history, and values in their orientation programs for new full-time faculty members? Participants will share practices that have been effective on their campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Wayne Powel</em></strong>, Provost, Saint Francis University (PA)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Promoting Undergraduate Research</h2><div>Participants are invited to discuss campus initiatives to promote undergraduate students’ research. What incentives encourage participation by faculty members across the campus, including those teaching primarily graduate students? What are some low- or no-cost ideas for celebrating the accomplishments of undergraduate researchers?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Michelle Kalis</em></strong>, Provost, University of Saint Joseph (CT)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Rethinking Faculty Workload: Challenges and Opportunities</h2><div>How are CIC institutions rethinking faculty workload and policies about its measurement? How have faculty members been involved in developing new load policies? The chief academic officer from Edgewood College will share his institution’s approach to understanding and redefining faculty workload and will invite participants to discuss the methods they have used or are considering on their own campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Dean A. Pribbenow</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, Edgewood College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Strategies to Improve Faculty Members’ Collegiality</h2><div>How can chief academic officers and deans effectively address strained relationships that may develop among individuals, departments, or small groups of faculty members at their institutions? Participants will share activities and other strategies that have strengthened collegiality in faculty interactions and improved campus culture.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Jarrod Erbe</em></strong>, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Wisconsin Lutheran College</div><div><strong><em>John D. Kolander</em></strong>, Provost, Wisconsin Lutheran College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>The CAO’s Relationship with the Board of Trustees</h2><div>The CAO plays an important role in educating board members about academic affairs and facilitating board interactions with faculty members. What are the appropriate limits on such interactions, and what opportunities lead to the meaningful engagement of trustees? Participants will share their advice and experiences. </div><blockquote><div><strong><em>William C. Deeds</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Morningside College</div></blockquote><div><div> </div><h2>The Learning Spaces Collaboratory</h2><div>The Learning Spaces Collaboratory (LSC) is committed to connecting research on how students learn to the planning of new and renovated academic spaces. Join in a discussion of the work being done by the LSC and how campuses are thinking about using that work to engage in conversations about learning spaces on campus.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Shawn Christian</em></strong>, Associate Provost, Wheaton College</div><div><strong><em>Renée T. White</em></strong>, Provost, Wheaton College</div></blockquote><div> </div></div><h2>Tips for Implementing a New General Education Program</h2><div>Over a single year, Carlow University designed a new general education curriculum and is now in the second year of its successful implementation. Carlow’s chief academic officer will share factors that facilitated the process as well as lessons learned. Participants are invited to give feedback and to discuss their own experiences of general education revision.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Deanne H. D’Emilio</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Carlow University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>What’s on the Chief Academic Officer’s Book Shelf?</h2><div>What books should current and aspiring chief academic officers read? Participants are invited to exchange recommendations and to discuss books that have influenced their work and professional growth as academic leaders.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Brent Yoder</em></strong>, Vice President of Academics, Hesston College</div></blockquote></div>
ConsultationsConsultations23<span><span><h2>​Retirement Consultation</h2> <div>TIAA counselors will be available for personal consultations with Institute participants for one-hour sessions during the conference. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk to discuss personal financial planning for retirement.</div><h2><br>Faculty Compensation and Benefits Consultation</h2><div> <strong><em>Frank A. Casagrande</em></strong>, president of Casagrande Consulting, LLC, will be available for individual consultations with Institute participants to discuss the nuances of faculty compensation philosophies, structures, and best practices. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk or contact Casagrande at (404) 200-5941 or <a href="mailto:franka@casagrandeconsultingllc.com">franka@casagrandeconsultingllc.com</a>.  </div> <h2><br>Negotiating Presidential Compensation and Benefits Consultation</h2><div>Casagrande also will be available for personal consultations with CAOs who are candidates for presidential positions to discuss compensation and benefits for incoming presidents. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk or contact Casagrande.​</div></span></span>
Plenary Session: "How Diversity Makes Us Smarter"Plenary Session: "How Diversity Makes Us Smarter"24Katherine W. PhillipsPlenary Session<p>​<span style="color:#282828;"><span>Diversity on campus not only promotes social equality and provides opportunities to learn about other people, cultures, and values, but it also enhances learning in the classroom and the workplace. <strong><em>Katherine W. Phillips</em></strong> will discuss the ways in which diversity helps improve the performance of organizations and smaller work groups, based on the results of her research. She will demonstrate how the inclusion of numerous perspectives in a group setting enhances creativity and spurs group members to work more tenaciously at presenting their own positions and anticipating alternatives. The results are greater openness to new ideas and more carefully considered solutions to problems.</span></span></p>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions25Concurrent Session<h2>Faculty Workforce Trends</h2><div>Over the past 20 years, the composition of the faculty workforce has undergone significant change. Some of these changes have affected all sectors of higher education while others are concentrated in certain types of institutions. The TIAA Institute is contributing to a body of knowledge that informs higher education leaders’ thinking about critical trends, appropriate responses, and proactive planning to address the issues surrounding the changing composition of the faculty. Several TIAA Institute-supported scholarly papers and a new book, The Faculty Factor, by Martin Finkelstein, Valerie Martin Conley, and Jack H. Schuster, present the latest—and sometimes startling—information about these trends and what they mean for the professional prospects of women, men of color, and others. How have shifts away from tenured and tenure-track faculty positions and toward contingent positions—both full- and part-time—affected small to mid-sized independent colleges and universities? How are faculty careers, the nature of academic work, and student educational experiences affected? Are there potential cost savings? Have costs shifted to new academic programs or to nonacademic areas of the institution? What are the implications of changes in faculty workforce composition for the future of independent higher education?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Martin J. Finkelstein</em></strong>, Professor, Department of Education Leadership, Management, and Policy, Seton Hall University, and TIAA Institute Fellow</div><div><strong><em>Gregg Kvistad</em></strong>, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, University of Denver, and TIAA Institute Fellow</div><div><strong><em>Anne Ollen</em></strong>, Senior Director, TIAA Institute</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>J. Michael Hardin</em></strong>, Provost, Samford University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Follow-up: How Diversity Makes Us Smarter</h2><div>Participants will meet informally with Katherine Phillips to discuss further the ideas offered in her plenary address.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Katherine W. Phillips</em></strong>, Senior Vice Dean and Paul Calello Professor of Leadership and Ethics, Columbia University Business School</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Stephany Schlachter</em></strong>, Provost, Lewis University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Hiring and Evaluation Part I: Best Practices for Hiring</h2><div>Current political and legal challenges require chief academic officers to think carefully about the legal risks campuses face when conducting searches to fill faculty and staff positions. An experienced higher education attorney will discuss best search practices in drafting a position description, appointing and training the search committee, building the pool of applicants, checking references, completing background checks, and interviewing candidates.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Kathleen Rinehart</em></strong>, General Counsel, Saint Xavier University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Fred Kniss</em></strong>, Provost, Eastern Mennonite University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Managing Up: Getting the Most from Your Boss</h2><div><em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs and academic team members)</em></div><div>The relationships between the associate CAO and the CAO and between the CAO and the president are critical to the optimal operation of academic affairs. Each needs the other to be successful and they must build mutual trust and cooperation. While some teams just “click,” most relationships require deliberate attention and mindfulness. Effective management of these relationships depends very much on the personalities of the individuals involved, but there are some generalizations that apply in most situations. How do you manage the information flow? What structures work well? How can you overcome challenging experiences? This session will include opportunities for separate discussions among CAOs and academic team members, each trying to manage up effectively.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Gregory Kerr</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Montreat College</div><div><strong><em>Peter D. Eckel</em></strong>, Senior Fellow and Director of Leadership Programs,</div><div>Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy, University of Pennsylvania</div><div><strong><em>Mary Elizabeth Stivers</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Midway University</div><div><strong><em>Stephen D. Stahl</em></strong>, Provost, Baldwin Wallace University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Elfred Anthony Pinkard</em></strong>, Executive Vice President and Provost, Wilberforce University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Vocational Exploration in the Academic Program</h2><div>CIC’s Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) is a nationwide network of colleges and universities formed to enrich the intellectual and theological exploration of vocation among undergraduate students. NetVUE is administered by CIC with generous support from Lilly Endowment Inc. and is supported by member dues. In what ways has the introduction of vocational exploration enhanced the academic programs of member institutions? Three approaches will be featured: connection to and through the first-year experience course, through a sophomore experience and advising program, and through a full, scaffolded four-year experience.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Richard Ashbrook</em></strong>, Professor of Psychology, Capital University (OH)</div><div><strong><em>Elizabeth Rider</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty, Elizabethtown College</div><div><strong><em>Mark D. Ward</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, University of Dubuque</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Louise Carroll Keeley</em></strong>, Provost and Academic Vice President, Assumption College<span></span><br><span></span></div></blockquote>
Workshop for CAOs in Their Third or Fourth Year of ServiceWorkshop for CAOs in Their Third or Fourth Year of Service3Workshop​Please pre-register for this event, as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute registration, please call the CIC office at (202) 466-7230.<br><br><span><blockquote>Coordinators:<br><strong><em>Debbie Mauldin Cottrell</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Texas Lutheran University<br><strong><em>Marc M. Roy</em></strong>, Provost, Albion College<br></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>7:30–8:00 a.m.</strong></div> <h2>Continental Breakfast</h2> <div> </div> <div><strong>8:00–8:15 a.m.</strong></div> <h2>Welcome</h2> <blockquote><div><strong><em>Christoph Kunkel</em></strong>, Senior Vice President and Chief of Staff, CIC</div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>8:15–9:00 a.m.</strong></div> <h2>Framing the Day and Introductions</h2> <blockquote><div><strong><em>Debbie Cottrell</em></strong> and <strong><em>Marc Roy</em></strong></div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>9:00–10:30 a.m.</strong></div> <h2>Reflecting on the Moment</h2> <blockquote><div><strong><em>Debbie Cottrell</em></strong></div><div><br>Discussion Facilitators:</div><div><strong><em>Susan Calovini</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Affairs and Dean of the College, Salem College</div><div><strong><em>William T. Franz</em></strong>, Provost, Randolph-Macon College</div><div><strong><em>Judith A. Muyskens</em></strong>, Provost, Nebraska Wesleyan University</div><div><strong><em>Gerard P. O’Sullivan</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, Saint Peter’s University</div><div><strong><em>Elfred Anthony Pinkard</em></strong>, Executive Vice President and Provost, Wilberforce University</div><div><strong><em>Daniel Silber</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Culver-Stockton College</div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>10:30–10:45 a.m.</strong></div> <h2>Refreshment Break</h2> <div> </div> <div><strong>10:45–11:55 a.m.</strong></div> <h2>Case Studies with Facilitators</h2> <blockquote><div><strong><em>Marc Roy</em></strong></div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>Noon–1:00 p.m.</strong></div> <h2>Lunch</h2> <div> </div> <div><strong>1:10–2:15 p.m.</strong></div> <h2>Working with the President and the Cabinet</h2> <blockquote><div><strong><em>Marc Roy</em></strong></div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>2:15–3:00 p.m.</strong></div> <h2>Soul Care and Discussion with Facilitators</h2> <blockquote><div><strong><em>Debbie Cottrell</em></strong></div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>3:00–3:15 p.m.</strong></div> <h2>Refreshment Break</h2> <div> </div> <div><strong>3:15–4:00 p.m.</strong></div> <h2>What’s Keeping You Up at Night?</h2> <blockquote><div>Questions, answers, and discussion with all facilitators</div></blockquote> <div> </div> <div><strong>4:00 p.m.</strong></div> <h2>Workshop Adjourns</h2></span>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions26Concurrent Session<h2>Anticipating a Professional Change in Your Future?</h2><div><em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs)</em></div><div>Academic leaders choose to move from one institution to another for many reasons, including career advancement, a desire for new challenges, escape from an unhealthy work environment, and personal circumstances. Experienced CAOs will offer tips and observations on determining when it is time to move, finding a new direction, navigating career transitions, settling into a new place and position, and maintaining a positive outlook.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Laura Elizabeth Niesen de Abruña</em></strong>, Provost, York College of Pennsylvania</div><div><strong><em>Joseph Roidt</em></strong>, Provost, Dakota Wesleyan University</div><div><strong><em>Marc M. Roy</em></strong>, Provost, Albion College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Aimee Sapp</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Undergraduate College, William Woods University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Chief Academic Officers and Communities: Outreach Programs in the Performing Arts</h2><div>Chief academic officers are often called upon to help create meaningful connections between their academic institutions and the larger communities. Such collaborations are characterized by complex and frequently changing institutional elements and community interests. Projects for which the chief academic officer helped create significant academic/community partnerships will be used as case studies for this session. The session will focus on the chief academic officer’s role in the development of these projects.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Jonathan D. Green</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Illinois Wesleyan University</div><div><strong><em>Paul Leslie</em></strong>, Senior Vice President for Academics, Greensboro College</div><div><strong><em>Beth Rushing</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Guilford College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Julia Jasken</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, McDaniel College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Enhancing Students’ Success by Improved Access to Course Materials</h2><div>Faced with increasing textbook costs and the reality that many students no longer purchase course materials, some colleges and universities are trying new ways to give students access to required materials. Early results indicate significantly improved access to textbooks and other materials, reduced costs to students, and increased student retention rates. CAOs will discuss successful approaches—and cautionary advice—from several campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Charlie T. McCormick</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Schreiner University</div><div><strong><em>Bill Muse</em></strong>, Vice President for Administration and Finance, Schreiner University</div><div><strong><em>Catharine E. O’Connell</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Illinois College</div><div><strong><em>Jason Pierce</em></strong>, Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mars Hill University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Cynthia K. Kosso</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Moravian College</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Hiring and Evaluation Part II: Best Practices for Performance Evaluation</h2><div>Current political and legal challenges require chief academic officers to think carefully about the legal risks campuses face when evaluating the performance of faculty and staff members, especially when dealing with unacceptable behavior or poor performance and the possible termination of employees. An experienced higher education attorney will share best practices and tools that can help administrators conduct meaningful evaluations while minimizing risk to the institution and themselves.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Kathleen Rinehart</em></strong>, General Counsel, Saint Xavier University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Edwin F. Estevez</em></strong>, Provost and Chief Operating Officer, Greenville College (IL)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Open Mike for Chief Academic Officers</h2><div><em>(Open only to currently-serving CAOs)</em></div><div>CAOs will have the opportunity to seek advice from colleagues on specific issues and to share information about emerging trends and practices in private higher education.</div><blockquote><div>Moderator: <strong><em>Pareena Lawrence</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Augustana College (IL), and Chair, CIC CAO Task Force</div></blockquote>
Free Time for LunchFree Time for Lunch27Spouses and Partners
Meetings of Associated OrganizationsMeetings of Associated Organizations27<h2></h2><h2>Missouri Chief Academic Officers Lunch</h2><blockquote><div>Coordinator: <strong><em>David Starrett</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Columbia College (MO)</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Wesleyan Holiness Consortium Chief Academic Officers Lunch</h2><blockquote><div>Coordinator: <strong><em>Kevin W. Mannoia</em></strong>, Chair and Founder<br></div></blockquote>
Optional Excursion: City TourOptional Excursion: City Tour28Optional Excursion<span> <p>​<img class="img-responsive" src="/p/2016-CAO-Institute/PublishingImages/city-tour.jpg" alt="City Tour photos of horse statues" style="margin:5px;width:500px;" /></p> <p>This guided tour includes two of New Orleans’s most famous attractions: the French Quarter, the city’s oldest neighborhood, and St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, the historic above-ground cemetery. The tour continues to the old American Sector, known today as the Warehouse/Arts District, which was originally established as an industrial area in the 19th century to store grain, coffee, and produce shipped through the Port of New Orleans. The tour continues to the Garden District, where some of the residences are still known by the names of the families that built them over a century ago and which is home to the city’s oldest streetcar line.<br><br><em>Per Person: $49</em><br><br><em>Excursion options are provided by Joieful. Please book directly with the company through their website: <a href="https://joieful.com/program/cic" target="_blank">https://joieful.com/program/cic</a>. CIC will not handle registrations for the excursions. Note that any changes, cancellations, or requests for refunds also must be made directly with Joieful. Please refer to Joieful’s refund and cancellation policies.</em></p></span>
Workshop: "Aligning Planning with Resource Allocation and Assessment"Workshop: "Aligning Planning with Resource Allocation and Assessment"29Larry GoldsteinWorkshop<div><em>Please pre-register for these events, as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute registration, please call the CIC office at (202) 466-7230.</em><br><br>This workshop is about methods to improve the alignment of planning with resource allocation and assessment. The session will open with a presentation, followed by an activity in which participants assess how they might practically apply concepts on their own campus. Topics to be discussed include the differences among strategic, infrastructural, and operational planning; key issues related to resource allocation and common higher education budget models; and organizational assessment. </div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Larry Goldstein</em></strong>, President, Campus Strategies, LLC</div></blockquote><div><em>Fee: early rate $40 (by September 6); regular rate $50 (after September 6)</em></div>
Workshop: "Challenges to Shared Governance in a Time of Constrained Resources"Workshop: "Challenges to Shared Governance in a Time of Constrained Resources"29Frank Boyd, Michael Orr, John Ottenhoff, David WheatonWorkshop<div><em>Please pre-register for these events, as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute registration, please call the CIC office at (202) 466-7230.</em><br><br>Colleges and universities face increasing financial and demographic pressures that require timely institutional responses. Faculty leaders often have limited understanding of their institution’s budget constraints, and many academic administrators are not well prepared to lead discussions on these issues. The result is a system of shared governance in which faculty members find it difficult to participate in important strategic decisions. This workshop will follow the pattern of a recent initiative by the Associated Colleges of the Midwest, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to develop a more sophisticated understanding among faculty members of the financial challenges facing liberal arts colleges. An overview of the budget and enrollment challenges facing tuition-dependent institutions will help CAOs and their academic team members develop a working familiarity with important terminology, concepts, and data. Participants will apply what they have learned to a discussion of an iterative governance case study that incorporates a financial profile of an institution, including budget, enrollment, and governance history. At the end of the session, participants should have a stronger command of the issues regarding college finances and tools for improving the conversation about those issues on their campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Frank Boyd</em></strong>, Associate Provost, Illinois Wesleyan University</div><div><strong><em>Michael Orr</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Lake Forest College</div><div><strong><em>John Ottenhoff</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of Idaho</div><div><strong><em>David Wheaton</em></strong>, Vice President for Administration and Finance, Macalester College</div></blockquote><div><em>Fee: early rate $40 (by September 6); regular rate $50 (after September 6)</em></div>
Workshop: "Improving Students’ Financial Literacy—Strategies that Work"Workshop: "Improving Students’ Financial Literacy—Strategies that Work"29Daniel Denecke, Patricia Mooney-Melvin, Betsy Palmer, Bettie C. StarrWorkshop<div><em>Please pre-register for these events, as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute registration, please call the CIC office at (202) 466-7230.</em><br><br>Helping undergraduate and graduate students understand financial fundamentals, particularly in relation to financial aid, is more important than ever. Colleges and universities have a special opportunity to educate students about their finances, work with them to align educational and career plans, and help them understand that acquiring financial literacy is critical to building lasting financial security.  This workshop will explore the results from a three-year collaboration involving the Council of Graduate Schools, TIAA, and 15 colleges and universities to develop, promote, assess, and enhance comprehensive financial education programs for undergraduate and graduate students. The initiative gathered powerful insights and data (including recent student survey findings and focus group results) and identified best practices, including curricula, tools, and resources for financial education programs that colleges and universities can apply to boost financial literacy among their students. Participants will learn about the latest data trends and how to access and use materials with students on their own campuses.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Daniel Denecke</em></strong>, Vice President, Best Practices and Strategic Initiatives, Council of Graduate Schools</div><div><strong><em>Patricia Mooney-Melvin</em></strong>, Interim Dean, Graduate School, Loyola University of Chicago</div><div><strong><em>Betsy Palmer</em></strong>, Senior Vice President, Communications and Marketing, TIAA</div><div><strong><em>Bettie C. Starr</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lindsey Wilson College </div></blockquote><div><em>No fee. Preregistration required.</em></div>
Workshop for New Academic Team MembersWorkshop for New Academic Team Members29Jeffrey H. Barker, Leanne M. Neilson, Jenifer K. WardWorkshop<div><em>Please pre-register for these events, as space is limited. To add an event to an existing Institute registration, please call the CIC office at (202) 466-7230.</em><br><br>Academic team members (such as associate or assistant provosts or vice presidents and deans) who have served for fewer than two years are invited to participate in a workshop led by experienced colleagues that focuses on the issues that newer academic team members often face. Participants will work in small groups, analyze case studies, and discuss such topics as accreditation; assessment and institutional effectiveness; budget management; handling difficult conversations; faculty governance and leadership; managing time, technolog<span></span><span style="display:inline-block;"></span>y, and paper; and working with peer administrators.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Jeffrey H. Barker</em></strong>, Provost, Converse College</div><div><strong><em>Leanne M. Neilson</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California Lutheran University<br><strong><em>Jenifer K. Ward</em></strong>, Provost and Dean of the College, Centenary College of Louisiana<br></div></blockquote><div><div><em>No fee. Preregistration required.</em><span style="display:inline-block;"></span></div></div>
Free Time for DinnerFree Time for Dinner30
Meetings of Associated OrganizationsMeetings of Associated Organizations30<h2></h2><h2>Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers Dinner</h2><blockquote><div>Coordinator: <strong><em>Jeffrey E. Arnold</em></strong>, Executive Director, Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Council for Christian Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers Dinner</h2><blockquote><div>Coordinator: <strong><em>Rick Ostrander</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professional Programs, Council for Christian Colleges and Universities</div></blockquote>
New CAO Mentors Orientation Meeting (By invitation only)New CAO Mentors Orientation Meeting (By invitation only)4
Institute Registration and Idea ExchangeInstitute Registration and Idea Exchange31
Breakfast and Poster SessionBreakfast and Poster Session33<p>​As a new feature this year, a poster session on dashboards for academic affairs will be held during <strong>breakfast on Tuesday, November 8, 7:30–9:00 a.m.</strong> (Posters must be removed by 9:15 a.m.) Poster boards will be placed around the room. Participants are invited to bring examples of dashboards used to track data on academic affairs for presentations to trustees, the cabinet, faculty members, and other groups. The poster should focus on which types of data are tracked and how they are displayed, not on the data themselves (which can be included or not). Poster size is limited to four feet by four feet and participation is limited to the first 50 proposals accepted. To apply for a space, please contact <strong><em>Kathy Whatley</em></strong> at <span><a href="mailto:kwhatley@cic.nche.edu">kwhatley@cic.nche.edu</a><a href="mailto:kwhatley@cic.nche.edu"><span style="display:inline-block;"></span></a></span>. Participants should be prepared to discuss their data choices and presentation strategies with colleagues.</p>
Concurrent SessionsConcurrent Sessions32Concurrent Session<h2></h2><h2>Building a Faculty Compensation Structure</h2><div>Austin College and the University of Puget Sound recently completed multi-year efforts to build compensation structures for faculty members. Each process was anchored by a task force composed of faculty members, deans, senior administrators, and trustees. Each task force determined a compensation philosophy, developed a valid and reliable peer group endorsed by the faculty and administration, and then designed a compensation structure based on the current economic realities of the institution. The CAOs will describe how they managed the process and discuss campus reactions to the new compensation models.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Sheila Amin Gutiérrez de Piñeres</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Austin College</div><div><strong><em>Kristine Bartanen</em></strong>, Academic Vice President and Dean of the University, University of Puget Sound</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>John Ottenhoff</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, The College of Idaho</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Communicating Financial Realities to Faculty Members Using CIC’s Financial Indicators Tool (FIT) and Key Indicators Tool (KIT)</h2><div>Faculty and staff members can benefit from understanding the institutional benchmarks included in CIC’s KIT and FIT reports as a context for informed decision making. Using the FIT Composite Financial Index and its four component ratios, CAOs can help the campus community gain perspective on the institution’s financial well-being. CAOs also can review the data in the KIT with institutional stakeholders—data that include average faculty salaries within the context of financial resources, percentage of part-time faculty, faculty-student ratio, instructional costs per student, and the overall expenditure per student.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>J. Andrew Prall</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Saint Francis (IN)</div><div><strong><em>Michael Williams</em></strong>, President, Austen Group, a Division of Ruffalo Noel Levitz</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Laura Niesen de Abruña</em></strong>, Provost, York College of Pennsylvania</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Models for Developing and Discontinuing Academic Programs</h2><div>Academic offerings should stay in a state of dynamic equilibrium, with new programs under development, programs past their effectiveness phasing out, and a backbone of core offerings under periodic review for freshness and relevance. What college or university policies or procedures support this ideal academic program management? Which on- or off-campus constituents must be consulted before decisions about starting new programs or discontinuing current programs are made? How can this important campus work take place transparently, move forward in a timely manner, and unite the campus?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Dennis Leighton</em></strong>, Associate Provost for Student Success, University of New England</div><div><strong><em>Chad A. Pulver</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Saint Joseph’s College (IN)</div><div><strong><em>Jane M. Wood</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, Mount Marty College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Mark A. Roberts</em></strong>, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Reinhardt University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Faculty</h2><div>Many CIC-member institutions have worked successfully to enroll a student population that reflects diversity of all kinds. With that success comes another challenge: to assemble a faculty that is equally diverse. What strategies have proven effective for recruiting faculty members who represent a wide range of backgrounds, experiences, races, ethnicities, and sexual orientations without intruding on the privacy of potential candidates? How should recruiting procedures change to attract diverse candidates? What types of support systems provide a welcoming environment for all faculty members?</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Marcheta Evans</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Our Lady of the Lake University (TX)</div><div><strong><em>Kathryn A. Morris</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Butler University</div><div><strong><em>Leanne M. Neilson</em></strong>, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California Lutheran University</div><div><strong><em>Julian Schuster</em></strong>, Provost, Senior Vice President, and Chief Operating Officer, Webster University</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Madison Sowell</em></strong>, Provost, Southern Virginia University</div></blockquote><div> </div><h2>Well-Being and Student Success in Higher Education</h2><div>When students feel a sense of inclusion and belonging on a college or university campus, their ability to engage with the college community, the curriculum, and the co-curriculum is enhanced. As a result, the sense of well-being—of being in the right place at the right time—correlates with increased rates of student persistence to graduation. What can academic leaders do to encourage a campus climate of well-being for students as well as faculty and staff members? What effective practices and programs intentionally encourage well-being, particularly for first-generation students and underrepresented groups? Contributors to a new book published by Bringing Theory to Practice, <em>Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education’s Greater Purposes</em> (2016), and other academic leaders will lead this session.</div><blockquote><div><strong><em>Chad Berry</em></strong>, Academic Vice President and Dean of the Faculty, Berea College</div><div><strong><em>Ashley Finley</em></strong>, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Dominican Experience, Dominican University of California, and National Evaluator, Bringing Theory to Practice</div><div><strong><em>Donald W. Harward</em></strong>, President Emeritus, Bates College, and Director, Bringing Theory to Practice</div><div><strong><em>Kazi Joshua</em></strong>, Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion, Whitman College</div><div>Chair: <strong><em>Elissa Heil</em></strong>, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Wilson College<br></div></blockquote>
Closing Plenary Session: "Demonstrating Improvements in Teaching"Closing Plenary Session: "Demonstrating Improvements in Teaching"34Carl E. WiemanPlenary Session<p>​<span><span><span>CIC’s recent report, <em>Strengthening the STEM Pipeline: The Contributions of Small and Mid-Sized Independent Colleges</em>, documents that small and mid-sized independent institutions are preparing students for careers and graduate study in STEM fields more cost-effectively than many large universities. In some STEM fields, small or mid-sized independent colleges actually produce more graduates who obtain PhDs than significantly larger research universities. In addition, all students, future scientists or not, need some of the skills that the sciences teach, such as the quantitative skills increasingly valued by employers. Nobel prize-winning physicist <strong><em>Carl E. Wieman</em></strong> has pioneered and championed the use of experimental techniques to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of various teaching methods for mathematics and the natural sciences. The results are dramatic. Even the best lectures produce substantially less student learning than active learning methods. Fortunately, active learning can be adapted to teaching in other disciplines and settings and is already used in many CIC college classrooms. Wieman will discuss the cognitive science foundation of the most effective teaching strategies, the results of his research, and the implications for STEM education at independent colleges and universities. Wieman also will discuss how his research has led to a more effective way to evaluate the quality of teaching in STEM fields and the social sciences. This method could help independent colleges guide and track improvements in the quality of teaching.</span></span></span></p>
CAO Task Force MeetingCAO Task Force Meeting35
Meetings of Associated OrganizationsMeetings of Associated Organizations36<h2>Wesleyan Holiness Consortium Chief Academic Officers</h2><div>Will meet for lunch and discussion <strong>Tuesday, November 8, 12:15–5:00 p.m.</strong></div><blockquote><div>Coordinator: <strong><em>Kevin W. Mannoia</em></strong>, Chair and Founder</div></blockquote>
Optional Excursion: Swamp TourOptional Excursion: Swamp Tour37Optional Excursion<span> <p>​<img alt="Swamp tour photos of boars and an alligator" src="/p/2016-CAO-Institute/PublishingImages/swamp-tour.jpg" class="img-responsive" style="margin:5px;width:500px;" /></p> <p>The swamp tour takes guests on a leisurely cruise along the mysterious bayous, part of the only remaining preserved wetlands in Louisiana. Guests will see exotic flora and fauna found nowhere else in the country. Alligators, raccoons, owls, wild boars, nutria, turtles, bald eagles, black bears, and many birds may be observed just feet away. The tour is guided by generations-long New Orleanians who have lived off the water all of their lives.<br><br><em>Per Person: $60</em><br><br><em>Excursion options are provided by Joieful. Please book directly with the company through their website: <a target="_blank" href="https://joieful.com/program/cic">https://joieful.com/program/cic</a>. CIC will not handle registrations for the excursions. Note that any changes, cancellations, or requests for refunds also must be made directly with Joieful. Please refer to Joieful’s refund and cancellation policies.</em></p></span>
Lutheran Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers MeetingLutheran Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers Meeting38Mark N. Wilhelm<p>​Coordinator: <strong><em>Mark N. Wilhelm</em></strong>, Program Director for Schools, Colleges, and Universities, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America</p>
Senior Leadership Academy (By invitation only)Senior Leadership Academy (By invitation only)39
Mennonite Colleges Chief Academic Officers MeetingMennonite Colleges Chief Academic Officers Meeting40Sally Weaver SommerCoordinator: <strong><em>Sally Weaver Sommer</em></strong>, Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs, Bluffton University
Welcome and Keynote Address: "There Is Life after College"Welcome and Keynote Address: "There Is Life after College"5Jeff SelingoPlenary Session<p>​<span style="color:#282828;"><strong><em>Jeffrey J. Selingo</em></strong>, after publishing a book that criticized the traditional model of liberal arts education, has found that graduates of CIC-type institutions are succeeding in their post-college careers. Selingo will address key questions such as: Why is the transition to post-college life so difficult for many recent graduates? How can new graduates better market themselves to employers? What skills should all students develop before they graduate from college? Selingo will offer practical advice that students can follow to acquire the skills companies want and will discuss what CAOs can do to put students on a path to fulfilling employment.</span></p>
Concordia University System Chief Academic Officers MeetingConcordia University System Chief Academic Officers Meeting41Paul A. Philp<p>​Coordinator: <strong><em>Paul A. Philp</em></strong>, Director of Institutional Research and Integrity, Concordia University System</p>
Catholic Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers MeetingCatholic Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers Meeting42Colleen Hegranes<p>​Coordinator: <strong><em>Colleen Hegranes</em></strong>, Executive Vice President and Provost, St. Catherine University</p>
Chief Academic Officers Task Force Meeting (By invitation only)Chief Academic Officers Task Force Meeting (By invitation only)43
Mentors Meet New CAOs (By invitation only)Mentors Meet New CAOs (By invitation only)44
Buffet DinnerBuffet Dinner46Spouses and Partners

Sharing Ideas with Colleagues

 Consultations

Retirement Consultation

TIAA counselors will be available for personal consultations with Institute participants for one-hour sessions during the conference. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk to discuss personal financial planning for retirement.
 

Faculty Compensation and Benefits Consultation

Frank A. Casagrande, president of Casagrande Consulting, LLC, will be available for individual consultations with Institute participants to discuss the nuances of faculty compensation philosophies, structures, and best practices. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk or contact Casagrande at (404) 200-5941 or franka@casagrandeconsultingllc.com
 

Negotiating Presidential Compensation and Benefits Consultation

Casagrande also will be available for personal consultations with CAOs who are candidates for presidential positions to discuss compensation and benefits for incoming presidents. Sign up at the CIC Registration Desk or contact Casagrande.

 Poster Session


As a new feature this year, a poster session on dashboards for academic affairs will be held during breakfast on Tuesday, November 8, 7:30–9:00 a.m. (Posters must be removed by 9:15 a.m.) Poster boards will be placed around the room. Participants are invited to bring examples of dashboards used to track data on academic affairs for presentations to trustees, the cabinet, faculty members, and other groups. The poster should focus on which types of data are tracked and how they are displayed, not on the data themselves (which can be included or not). Poster size is limited to four feet by four feet and participation is limited to the first 50 proposals accepted. To apply for a space, please contact Kathy Whatley at kwhatley@cic.nche.edu. Participants should be prepared to discuss their data choices and presentation strategies with colleagues.

 Idea Exchange


Conference participants are encouraged to share information with colleagues about their best programs, policies, and ideas. An area near the conference registration desk will be available for a display of materials. To make this exchange a success, Institute participants are encouraged to bring a reference copy of each item they wish to display and 50 business cards for easy follow-up after the conference. Speakers’ handouts and other materials also will be made available in this area for the benefit of those who cannot attend a presentation.

 Breakfast Discussions


Discussion sessions on Sunday and Monday mornings provide opportunities to gain practical advice from colleagues. Topics will include current issues and perennial concerns of CAOs. Discussion facilitators will be colleagues experienced with each topic. Suggestions for topics or leaders should be directed to Jonnie G. Guerra, CIC senior advisor, at jguerra@cic.nche.edu or (765) 463-3415. To date the following breakfast discussions are planned:
  • Academic Honesty Policies
  • Aligning Vocation and Mission for Aspiring Presidents
  • Bringing a CIC Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow to Campus
  • CAOs and CFOs: Partners or Competitors?
  • Celebrating Faculty Success
  • CIC Benchmarking Reports: Key Indicator Tool (KIT) and Financial Indicators Tool (FIT)
  • CIC’s Executive Leadership Academy and Senior Leadership Academy
  • CIC’s Presidential Vocation and Institutional Mission Program
  • Communication Strategies for Academic Teams
  • Cultivating the Next Generation of Academic Leaders
  • Developing a Collaborative Academic Leadership Team
  • Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives That Reshape Campus Culture
  • Enrollment Capacity in Academic Programs
  • Faculty Credentials and Qualifications
  • Getting on the Same Page:  How to Make Faculty Handbook Revision a Success
  • Guiding Students to "Do Their Disciplines" Through Performance Learning
  • Instead of Competing, Collaborate
  • Launching an Open Textbook Initiative and Z Degree
  • Making Connections to Your Students’ Cultures
  • Managing Information Technology Departments and Instructional Designers
  • Managing Up: The CAO’s Relationship with the President
  • Navigating the Retention Vortex of Late Registration
  • New Solutions: CAOs as Partners in Fundraising
  • Online Programs: Home-Grown or Outsourced?
  • Opportunities within CIC’s Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE)
  • Orienting New Faculty Members to Institutional Mission
  • Partnerships with Chinese Universities
  • Promoting Undergraduate Research
  • Selecting Peer and Aspirant Institutions
  • Senior Faculty Members as Strategic Partners
  • Shepherding the Institution through the Reaccreditation Process
  • Special Challenges of Health Sciences Programs
  • Strategies to Improve Faculty Members' Collegiality
  • The CAO's Relationship with the Board of Trustees
  • The Challenges of Nine-Month Contracts on Twelve-Month Campuses
  • The Role of Digital Learning in a Liberal Arts Curriculum
  • Tips for Implementing a New Core Curriculum
  • Top Trends for Academic Libraries
  • We’re On the Same Side: Building Bridges Between Academic Affairs and Student Life
  • What's on the Chief Academic Officer's Book Shelf?
  • Workshop for New CAOs: Continuing the Conversation

Hotel and Travel

 Location

​Hyatt Regency New Orleans

601 Loyola Avenue
New Orleans, Louisiana 70113
(504) 561-1234

 Hotel Information


Hyatt Regency New Orleans hotel at duskAll program sessions of the Institute for Chief Academic Officers will be held at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans Hotel.

Room Rate: $185 single/double
Hotel Cut-off Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2016
 
The Hyatt Regency New Orleans Hotel is located in downtown New Orleans, near many cultural, shopping, and entertainment options. Nearby attractions include the French Quarter, the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, Champions Square, Julia Street Art Galleries, World War II Museum, Aquarium of the Americas and IMAX Theater, Port of New Orleans, and the Mississippi Riverfront.

The Loyola Avenue Streetcar, which passes directly in front the hotel, can take guests on a scenic tour of New Orleans’s most famous attractions including the French Quarter, Bourbon Street, and Garden District. Streetcar fare is $1.25 each way, and Jazzy Passes for unlimited rides are $3 per day.

Hotel reservations can be booked online or call (888) 421-1442 and refer to the Council of Independent Colleges’ Institute for Chief Academic Officers. Reservations made after the cut-off date cannot be guaranteed at the conference rate and will be accommodated on a space-available basis. A limited number of rooms will be available before and after the Institute dates at the Institute rate. Contact the hotel for details.


Dress Guidelines

Business casual wear is appropriate throughout the Institute. Business attire is suggested only for the opening keynote address and the following reception and buffet dinner on Saturday, November 5. If you plan to participate in any of the optional excursions, please be sure to wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes and bring along a hat and sunglasses.

 Travel

Airport

The Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY) is located about 12 miles from the hotel.
 

Driving Directions

Upon leaving the airport, take Interstate I-10 East toward downtown. Stay in the right lane. Take exit #234-B (Poydras/Superdome). Take the exit on the left to Poydras Street. Proceed on Poydras Street. Turn right onto Loyola Avenue. The Hyatt Regency New Orleans Hotel will be on the right.
 

Parking

Overnight valet parking is available at the hotel at $40 per night.
 

Taxi

Taxi service is available from Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport to and from the hotel for a fare of about $36 (one way) for up to two passengers. There is a $15 per person charge for each additional passenger. Pick-up is on the lower level, outside the baggage claim area. There may be an additional charge for extra baggage.
 

Shuttle Service

The Hyatt Regency New Orleans extends to its guests a 5 percent discount on shuttle transportation booked through its partner MyAirportTrip.com. Book transportation online.
 
Shuttle service is available from the airport to the hotels in the central business district for a discounted fare of about $23 (per person, one-way) or $42 (per person, round-trip) with up to three bags per person. Advance reservations are required 48 hours prior to travel for all ADA accessible transfers. Please call in advance of your travel date to reserve the specially-equipped shuttle.
 

Airport Limousines

Airport Limousine is the official limousine service for Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport. Convenient kiosks are located in the baggage claim area, and curbside pickups are available. Rates begin at $58 for one or two passengers.
 

Amtrak

Union Station is located at 1001 Loyola Avenue in New Orleans, about a quarter mile south of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans. Passengers should use limousine, public bus, or taxi service for transfers between the station and the hotel.

Sponsors and Task Force

​​​CIC is grateful to the following sponsors (to date) for their support of the Institute:

 Signature

 

 

View All Sponsors


Chief Academic Officers Task Force

The program of the 2016 Institute for Chief Academic Officers is being planned with the assistance of CIC’s Chief Academic Officers Task Force:

Pareena Lawrence, Provost and Dean of the College, Augustana College (IL) (Chair)
Chad Berry, Academic Vice President and Dean of the Faculty, Berea College
Mary K. Boyd, Vice President for Academic Affairs, St. Edward’s University
Lily D. McNair, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Wagner College
Leanne M. Neilson, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California Lutheran
   University
Laura Niesen de Abruña, Provost, York College of Pennsylvania
Stephany Schlachter, Provost, Lewis University
Andrew Workman, Provost and Senior Vice President, Roger Williams University