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Online Humanities Course Descriptions

Go directly to courses from a participating institution:

 

HISTORY
 
A Revolutionary Time: Europe during the Modern Era
 
This course will examine the major events of the modern era and will particularly focus upon the social, economic and cultural developments in Europe from the French Revolution through the First World War. The course will contextualize the major changes that resulted from events including the industrial revolution, imperialism, and nation building. This course will particularly focus on social and economic changes and how these impacted gender roles during the modern era. Finally, this course will seek to bring students a better understanding of the long-term consequences of the wars that book-end the long nineteenth century. Using works of fiction, non-fiction and film, this course, through discussion, examination and writing assignments, will provide an understanding of how these many events transformed modern European society.
 
Instructor: Margaret Preston
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3 credits
Dates: CANCELLED
Required real-time meetings: None

Course registration period: November 16, 2015February 3, 2016
Registration instructions: Please visit the registration page at www.augie.edu/CIConline. For additional details, contact Sharon Gray, Director of Instructional Technology, Augustana University, gray@augie.edu (use the subject line “CIC Online Humanities Courses”), (605) 274-4907.
Registration contact: Registrar@augie.edu (use the subject line: “CIC Online Humanities Courses”).
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.




Religion
 
Jeremiah: Justice and Judgment, Proclamation and Promise
 
The biblical prophet Jeremiah lived in the volatile ancient near eastern world of the late 7th and early 6th century B.C.E. Threatened by internal political and social instability and by external Babylonian military aggression, the Hebrew nation of Judah, his home, was on the verge of collapse. Into this explosive situation, Jeremiah issued a call for revolution. He delivered both a message of divine judgment for social injustices, political corruption, and religious apostasy and also a message of divine promise for renewal beyond the judgment. Through a study of the biblical book of Jeremiah, students will encounter, engage with, and analyze the political, social, and theological issues relating to the controversial life and message of the prophet Jeremiah. Some of the central issues addressed by the course are patriotism versus treason, understandings of justice, and responses to suffering.
 
Instructor: Richard Bowman
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3 credits
Dates: February 3, 2016–May 13, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None
 
Course registration period: November 16, 2015February 3, 2016
Registration instructions: Please visit the registration page at www.augie.edu/CIConline. For additional details, contact Sharon Gray, Director of Instructional Technology, Augustana University, gray@augie.edu (use the subject line “CIC Online Humanities Courses”), (605) 274-4907.
Registration contact: Registrar@augie.edu (use the subject line: “CIC Online Humanities Courses”).
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.
 
 
 

ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
American Literature
 
This course is a survey of major American writers from the pre-colonial period to the twenty-first century. American history, literary movements, philosophies and cultures that influenced the writers will also be examined. Prerequisites: EN 131 and 132 (College English I and II) or permission of the instructor.
 
Instructor: Jan A. Holston
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Two, dates and times to be determined.
 
Course registration period: November 4, 2015–January 11, 2016
Registration instructions: Please download the registration instructions.
Registration contact: Patricia Kresl, Registrar, Bethune-Cookman University, kreslp@cookman.edu, (386) 481-2550
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
Concepts of the Heroic
 
Concepts of the Heroic will examine ideas of what constitutes the heroic using an interdisciplinary perspective. Examples of the hero projected in the arts and letters of a variety of world cultures, past and present, will be analyzed in the context of the cultures that produced them, compared across cultures, and assessed in terms of their potential to lead or mislead. Particular attention will be devoted to the comparison of ideal models of heroism and leadership projected by the arts with their effects on the behavior and reception of historical figures who have sought to reflect and project those ideals.
 
Instructor: Stephen Jones
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None
 
Course registration period: November 4, 2015–January 11, 2016
Registration instructions: Please download the registration instructions.
Registration contact: Patricia Kresl, Registrar, Bethune-Cookman University, kreslp@cookman.edu, (386) 481-2550
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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FRENCH
 
Conviviality at the Table: Food Politics in French
 
This seminar explores multiple constructions and interpretations of conviviality at the table in French & Francophone cultures. The material in this course will expose students to various kinds of food discourses as well as current interdisciplinary perspectives in order to achieve a cross-cultural understanding of the politics of conviviality necessary in the 21st century. Through the critically examination of mainstream and alternative food practices, students will deepen their understanding of cultural artifacts, social practices and political choices, as they improve and reinforce their own analytic skills. The language of instruction will be French.
 
Instructor: Philippe C. Dubois
Additional Details: Students will video conference with invited speakers and the instructor at regular intervals throughout the semester.
 
Credits/Units: 1 course credit
Dates: January 19, 2016–May 11, 2016
Required real-time meetings: One 90-minute video conference per week.
 
Course registration period: Registration begins on November 2, 2015.
Registration instructions: Please contact the Office of the Registrar.
Registration contact: Robert Midkiff, Associate Provost and Registrar, Bucknell University, midkiff@bucknell.edu, (570) 577-1561.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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JAPANESE
 
Advanced Japanese: Literature and Media
 
This course is designed for students of the Japanese language who have completed study at the third-year level (six semesters of language study or the equivalent) and who are prepared to read and treat authentic texts (non-textbook texts) from various genres: novels, short stories, poetry, blogs, newspapers, magazine, online news sources and other digital media. The goal of the course is offer a general overview of Japanese literature by introducing students to selected literary works in the modern canon, examining contrasting representative current digital media, and juxtaposing the two for the purpose of illuminating aspects of Japan’s literary evolution.
 
Instructor: Elizabeth A. Armstong
Additional Details: Learn more about the course.
 
Credits/Units: 1 course credit
Dates: January 19, 2016–May 11, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Two 90-minute video conferences per week.
 
Course registration period: Registration begins on November 2, 2015.
Registration instructions: Please contact the Office of the Registrar.
Registration contact: Robert Midkiff, Associate Provost and Registrar, Bucknell University, midkiff@bucknell.edu, (570) 577-1561.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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FRENCH/GENDER STUDIES
 
Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World
 
This course, taught in English, examines Francophone texts translated into English from a variety of media such as literature, film, and newspapers. We cover all corners of the globe, from Africa and the Americas to Asia and Europe. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of racial, gender, and economic relationships on the people of the French-speaking world, from a historical and contemporary perspective. The course emphasizes power in its many forms and seeks to understand, though in-depth analyses, conversations, simulations, and written assignments, the ways in which power plays a role in our lives. This course also counts toward the global studies, women’s studies, and international business programs. Note: Students with high intermediate/advanced French proficiency may take the course for French credit. They would do all the readings and written assignments in French.
 
Instructor: Gay Rawson
Additional Details: Learn more about the French Department and the Program in Women’s Studies at Concordia College. 
 
Credits/Units: 4.0 semester hours
Dates: January 4, 2016–April 29, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Concordia students will meet face-to-face once a week and virtually twice a week, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 10:30–11:40 a.m. Central Time.
 
Course registration period: November 16, 2015January 15, 2016.
Registration instructions:  See www.cord.edu/cicform.
Registration contact: Diane Holmquist, Registrar’s Office, Concordia College, holmquis@cord.edu, (218) 299-3250.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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GERMAN
 
Topics in German: German Literature after 1945
 
This course will examine the literature of the German speaking countries after 1945, with a focus on literary movements, genres, and representative works from major authors. Special attention will be given to the sociohistorical context from the end of World War Two, to the division of Germany during the Cold War and further to German reunification and its impact up to the present. The course will be conducted in German and English online by way of a synchronous virtual classroom (Adobe Connect), threaded discussion forums, and other online platforms. Students will have the option to take the course in English only or with a German-language component. Prerequisite: for German option, four semesters of college German or equivalent.
 
Instructor: Stephen Grollman
Additional Details: Learn more about the German Department at Concordia College. Review a copy of the syllabus.
 
Credits/Units: 4.0 semester hours
Dates: January 4, 2016–April 29, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Weekly synchronous meetings, times TBD.
 
Course registration period: November 16, 2015January 15, 2016.
Registration instructions:  See www.cord.edu/cicform.
Registration contact: Diane Holmquist, Registrar’s Office, Concordia College, holmquis@cord.edu, (218) 299-3250.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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RUSSIAN
 
Intermediate Russian
 
Study of Russian language, culture, and current events with an emphasis on Russian grammar, newscasts, video and film clips, and materials from the Russian internet. Students will improve speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills throughout the semester. Friday sessions will be devoted to the discussion and analysis of Russian and Soviet animated films. Prerequisite: Three to four years of high school Russian, two semesters of college Russian at entrance, or RUS 102.
 
Instructors: Andrea Lanoux (Connecticut College) and Carol Any (Trinity College)
Additional Details: Not offered in Spring 2016, but students from Consortium member institutions are invited to enroll in this course in Fall 2015. Same as RUSS 201 at Trinity College. Students (other than Trinity students) should enroll in RUS 201 at Connecticut College. 
 
Credits/Units: 4
Dates: September 3, 2015–December 16, 2015 (exam period ends December 22)
Required real-time meetings (UPDATED): Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursday from 11:50 a.m.–1:05 p.m. Eastern Time. The course will be taught in a blended format.
 
Course registration period: April 7–September 2, 2015
Registration instructions: Students should enroll through the Connecticut College Registrar’s Office.
Registration contact: Elisabeth Labriola, Registrar’s Office, Connecticut College, registrar@conncoll.edu, (860) 439-2068.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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RUSSIAN
 
Advanced Russian: Cultures of Dissent
 
The course traces a tradition of dissent in Russian culture against the backdrop of its mainstream history. Includes poetic, musical, performance, and other texts from the nineteenth century to the present that have inspired citizens to question the dominant narratives of the monolithic state.
 
Instructor: Laura Little
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 4
Dates: September 3, 2015–December 16, 2015 (exam period ends December 22)
Required real-time meetings: Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7:00–8:15 p.m. Eastern Time.
 
Course registration period: April 7–September 2, 2015
Registration instructions:  Students should enroll through the Connecticut College Registrar’s Office.
Registration contact: Elisabeth Labriola, Registrar’s Office, Connecticut College, registrar@conncoll.edu, (860) 439-2068.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
Contemporary China
 
In this course we will investigate contemporary Chinese society, defined as the post-Mao era, with a focus on history, politics, economics, social structures, and culture. Upon successfully completing this course, each student will analyze the political, economic, societal, and cultural structures of contemporary China; understand the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class inform individual and collective identities; demonstrate a knowledge of the beliefs, values, and issues that influence Chinese society; develop and nurture his or her critical reading, writing, and speaking skills; and understand China’s impact as a world power. There are no prerequisites for the course.
 
Instructor: David Kenley
Additional Details: Elizabethtown College has considerable expertise in Asian Studies and languages. David Kenley is a member of the College’s History Department and also contributes to our interdisciplinary Asian Studies minor. He also directs our Center for Global Understanding and Peacemaking. Visit Dr. Kenley’s website to learn more about the instructor of this course.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: Registration opens the week of November 9, 2015, but it would be beneficial to submit your course registration form by the end of the week prior to registration (i.e., by November 6, 2015). Submit course requests as soon as possible to optimize likelihood of seat availability. For calendars and important dates, please visit the Registration & Records web page.
Registration instructions: Review registration information and access the registration form for visiting students. Please email or phone Donna Reppert in the Registration & Records Office for answers to your questions or assistance with registration. Elizabethtown College will offer transfer credit for this course. Upon completion of the course, an official transcript will be mailed to the student’s home institution.
Registration contact: Donna Reppert, Registration & Records Office, Elizabethtown College, reppertd@etown.edu, (717) 361-3751.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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PHILOSOPHY/RELIGION
 
Indian Philosophy
 
This course will explore the philosophies of India–Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain. Starting with the hymns of the Rig Veda, which contain some of humanity’s earliest philosophical reflections, this course will trace the development of Indian philosophy from ancient times to the present. In addition to their historical development, the relevance of the various Indian philosophical systems to contemporary issues and universal human problems will be explored. No prerequisites for CIC Consortium students.
 
Instructor: Jeffery Long
Additional Details: Elizabethtown College has considerable expertise in Asian Studies and languages. Jeffrey Long is a member of the College’s Religious Studies Department and is actively involved with our interdisciplinary Asian Studies minor.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: Registration opens the week of November 9, 2015, but it would be beneficial to submit your course registration form by the end of the week prior to registration (i.e., by November 6, 2015). Submit course requests as soon as possible to optimize likelihood of seat availability. For calendars and important dates, please visit the Registration & Records web page.
Registration instructions: Review registration information and access the registration form for visiting students. Please email or phone Donna Reppert in the Registration & Records Office for answers to your questions or assistance with registration. Elizabethtown College will offer transfer credit for this course. Upon completion of the course, an official transcript will be mailed to the student’s home institution.
Registration contact: Donna Reppert, Registration & Records Office, Elizabethtown College, reppertd@etown.edu, (717) 361-3751.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
The Future of Reading
 
In this course, we will explore the practice of reading in American culture. As we consider our current reading practices, their relationship to those of the past, and their implications for those of the future, we will discover much about the affiliation between reading and technology. We will begin by thinking about the history of this association, investigating the extent to which nearly everything about a book, from the alphabet used to form its words, to the printing press used to mass-produce it; to the scroll, codex, or digital file upon which it is printed, is a technology. We will also take note of the strategies through which writers and their texts enable, resist, or offer commentary upon the symbiotic relationship between reading and technology. After anchoring ourselves in this history, we will use the insights we glean from the past to articulate our present understandings about the value of books and reading, and to consider the ways in which technological innovations may change our future relationships to these things. Among the questions that will guide our inquiry are the following: What is the relationship between reading and our culture of information? How is reading related to cognition? Are digital technologies changing the way we read and study literature? What do we gain, and what do we lose, when we employ different reading practices? What does the future hold for the practice of reading in the digital age? In this course, we will read works of literature alongside the work of historians, literary and cultural critics, and others as we generate our own insights about the past, present, and future of reading. In so doing, we will practice applying humanities research skills to real-world problems, and developing our ability to think critically about cultural ideas and practices.
 
Instructor: Andrew Logemann
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 4 credits
Dates: January 18, 2016–May 13, 2016
Required real-time meetings: In addition to the online components, this course will require a synchronous, real-time session once per week on Wednesdays from 2:10 p.m.–3:10 p.m. Eastern Time.
 
Course registration period: November 1, 2015–January 20, 2016.
Registration instructions: Please visit www.gordon.edu/cicreg.
Registration contact: Alice Falcone, Registrar, Gordon College, alice.falcone@gordon.edu, (978) 867-4242.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ART HISTORY
 
20th Century Art History
 
Beginning with early modernist styles, this survey course explores the chronological history and variety of artistic expression through the end of the Twentieth century. Exploring integral and conflicting movements and styles of Europe and America, this course examines the development of a rapidly changing culture of artists, media, and styles.
 
Instructor: Rachel Schwaller
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–April 28, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: Registration begins November 2, 2015.
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course.
Registration contact: Deborah Gannon, Registrar, Grand View University, dgannon@grandview.edu.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
The Civil War and Reconstruction
 
This course is an intensive survey of the United States during the era of Civil War and Reconstruction, roughly 1848-1880s. While the Civil War and Reconstruction were certainly dominant (and dominating) elements of the national experience during this period, there was much more to this turbulent and complex period than developments on eastern battlefields or inside the halls of national government. We will approach this era in a manner in which the war and Reconstruction figure prominently, but not exclusively, for a more complete sense of US history in this troubled period. We will attempt, as best we can, to see these years as the many and varied peoples of the U.S.—workers, African Americans, women, Native Americans, soldiers, civilians, politicians and rebels—experienced them.
 
Instructor: Kevin Gannon
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor.
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–April 28, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: Registration begins November 2, 2015.
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course.
Registration contact: Deborah Gannon, Registrar, Grand View University, dgannon@grandview.edu.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE/MEDIEVAL STUDIES
 
UPDATE: To be offered in Fall 2015 only!

Dragons, Monks, and Maidens: Medieval Literature and Its Manuscripts
 
What do you think when you hear “medieval?” What sorts of images and ideas come into your head? You will notice in this course the huge variety of subjects and approaches, from extremely pious to very bawdy, from violent to contemplative, from grave to funny. We will also need to talk about the cultures that this literature was a part of, the ideologies, events, material objects, and everyday life. This course will explore the development of literature in the island of Britain from the sixth through the fifteenth centuries, including major authors, works, and genres. We will approach the course using the framework of alterity (“the past is a foreign country”) and what Katherine Biddick called “the shock of medievalism.” This will allow us to pivot between alterity and familiarity since medieval Europe is both familiar (the roots of much of our American culture) and foreign (with very different cultural beliefs and practices). Examining medieval manuscripts and other objects give the course a grounding in material culture, which confronts us with the hand-crafted physicality of medieval life. Anthologies of edited, translated texts tend to suggest homogeneity, abstraction, and distance while manuscript study disrupts those tendencies. Cultural and historical contexts, such as the rise and decline of feudalism, pilgrimage and crusading, and the Black Death, will inform the discussion and analysis.
 
Instructor: Paul Gaffney
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: October 19, 2015–December 23, 2015
Required real-time meetings: Offered entirely online, but students will be required to participate via computer in four synchronous sessions during the semester.
 
Course registration period: Please contact the institution for details.
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course. Students must complete a simple special student application form that can be requested from the Office of Professional and Graduate Studies (PGS). Staff in PGS will assist with course registration, which can be completed via email.
Registration contact: Lana Whitehead, Office of Professional and Graduate Studies, Hiram College, whiteheadlk@hiram.edu, (330) 569-5180.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
Slavery and Abolition
 
Students in this course will describe the origins and nature of slavery in North America and will analyze and evaluate the ideas, strategies, and struggles of antislavery activists in the 18th and 19th centuries. Students will explain how and why slave labor was introduced into North America, describe what the slave experience was like and how it changed over time, identify and interpret the connections between slavery and race, and evaluate how slaveholders sought to justify and defend their so-called peculiar institution. Students will also develop arguments about what prompted the rise of an antislavery movement, explain how the abolition movement changed over time, assess the ideas and strategies that abolitionists embraced, and appraise the impact of abolitionists in ending slavery and pushing the nation into Civil War. During the final module of the course, students will debate the issues raised by John Brown’s raid on the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry in 1859 and will evaluate the significance of John Brown’s activism in U.S. history.
 
Instructor: Vivien Sandlund
Additional Details: By the end of this course, students will be able to:
  • Describe the origins, nature, and change over time of chattel slavery in British colonial North America and the United States.
  • Interpret the connections between slavery and ideas about race in British colonial North America and in the United States before the Civil War
  • Assess how slaves described their experiences and compare and contrast slave writings with the descriptions of slavery written by supporters of slavery.
  • Explain how different groups of Americans understood liberty and why some Americans sought to abolish slavery.
  • Evaluate the arguments of supporters of slavery who sought to justify the institution.
  • Analyze and assess the arguments and strategies used by various opponents of slavery.
  • Compare and contrast the strategies of different antislavery reformers and evaluate the results of each of these approaches.
  • Assess various ethical arguments about the use of violence to make social change. 
  • Analyze historical information and primary historical sources and develop their own historical arguments.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 18, 2016–April 30, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Offered entirely online, but students may be asked to participate via computer in optional synchronous sessions during the semester.
 
Course registration period: October 1, 2015–October 30, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course. Students must complete a simple special student application form that can be requested from the Office of Professional and Graduate Studies (PGS). Staff in PGS will assist with course registration, which can be completed via email.
Registration contact: Lana Whitehead, Office of Professional and Graduate Studies, Hiram College, whiteheadlk@hiram.edu, (330) 569-5180.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
History of Humanitarian Organizations
 
What does it mean to bring humanity to times of crisis and conflict? From the protection of prisoners of war during the First World War, to relief for Syrian refugees today, humanitarian aid has had a profound effect on the social, legal, and ethical development of the modern world. This advanced seminar examines the history of international humanitarian organizations like the International Committee of the Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders from 1863 to the present. We will interrogate a set of tensions that continue to characterize humanitarian relief today: the conflict between traditional principles and contemporary human rights; the role of governments in the provision of foreign aid; and the difficulties of enforcing the humanitarian protections of international law during sectarian conflicts. Prerequisites: First-year writing sequence or a 4 or 5 on the AP History test or permission of the instructor.
 
Instructor: Kimberly Lowe
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3 semester credits
Dates: January 25, 2016–May 13, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: November 3–November 6, 2015
Registration instructions: Download  and complete the registration form for Consortium courses and send a hard copy before November 3, 2015, to:
Dr. Christine Evans
Chair of Humanities Division
Lesley University
29 Everett Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
cevans@lesley.edu
Fax: (617) 349-8599
Registration contact: Dr. Christine Evans, Chair of Humanities Division, Lesley University, cevans@lesley.edu.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE/HISTORY/MEDIEVAL STUDIES
 
Medieval History and Literature
 
Students explore European and near Eastern history and literature from 600–1500 A.D., focusing on primary texts, art objects, and buildings. We study landmark events such as the Norman Conquest and the Crusades; students do in depth work with digital versions of medieval manuscripts and other artifacts. They also write an interdisciplinary term paper focused on one set of primary sources. Prerequisite: First-year writing sequence or a 4 or 5 on the AP History or English Literature test.
 
Instructor: Mary Dockray-Miller
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor. Watch an introductory lecture.
 
Credits/Units: 3 semester credits
Dates: January 25, 2016–May 13, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: November 3–November 6, 2015
Registration instructions: Download  and complete the registration form for Consortium courses and send a hard copy before November 3, 2015, to:
Dr. Christine Evans
Chair of Humanities Division
Lesley University
29 Everett Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
cevans@lesley.edu
Fax: (617) 349-8599
Registration contact: Dr. Christine Evans, Chair of Humanities Division, Lesley University, cevans@lesley.edu.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ART HISTORY/MEDIEVAL STUDIES
 
Ways of Seeing Byzantium
 
This course will consider the art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire that lasted from 325 to 1453. We will examine the monumental and important examples of Byzantine art through readings as well as digital humanities projects found online. Attention will be paid to the methodology of art history in readings and written assignments as students examine the theological, philosophical and historical influences on the art and architecture of Byzantium. As a major part of the course, students will research a panel painting to possibly add to a digital humanities project on Byzantine influence on Italian thirteenth-century panel painting.
 
Instructor: Gretchen McKay
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 4 hours
Dates: January 25, 2016–May 13, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: Begins November 2, 2015.
Registration instructions: McDaniel students can register for this class on the Archway. Students from other institutions will need to complete a non-degree registration form and submit it to the Registrar’s Office.
Registration contact: Stephanie Clark, Acting Registrar, McDaniel College, sclark@mcdaniel.edu, (410) 857-2755 (phone), (410) 857-2752 (fax).
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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RELIGION
 
Emerging Religions
 
Modern sects, cults, and “alternative” religious groups have held popular imagination, whether we are members of New Religious Movements (NRMs), or are outsiders fascinated by them. This course will use social science perspectives to explore theories and concepts relevant to the study of NRMs; to consider the relevance and meanings of religion in many people’s lives; to learn how cults develop into established institutions (or not); to analyze the legal, social, and political issues relating to emerging religions; and to create strategies for interacting with NRM groups that prevent popular misunderstandings and violence. Additionally, attention will be given to the impact of race, class, and gender identities on conversion to NRMs and on the public perception of certain NRMs. Prerequisites: None.
 
Instructor: Jill M. Krebs
Additional Details: Learn more about the Department of Religious Studies at McDaniel College. See a student presentation from the last time the course was offered.
 
Credits/Units: 4 hours
Dates: January 25, 2016–May 13, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: Begins November 2, 2015.
Registration instructions: McDaniel students can register for this class on the Archway. Students from other institutions will need to complete a non-degree registration form and submit it to the Registrar’s Office.
Registration contact: Stephanie Clark, Acting Registrar, McDaniel College, sclark@mcdaniel.edu, (410) 857-2755 (phone), (410) 857-2752 (fax).

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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PHILOSOPHY
 
Meta-Ethics
 
This course studies the foundations of morality through an exploration of its fundamental concepts from metaphysical, ontological, epistemological, semantic, and psychological perspectives. Its central task is to discern the meaning and status of ethical statements. The course examines two central questions: (1) In what does the truth of an ethical statement consists? (2) If nothing can make an ethical statement true, then why do we think and talk as though they can be true. Prerequisite: Ethics or Applied Ethics.
 
Instructor: Bernie Cantens
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor. Watch an introductory video to learn more about the course. Note that you will need a Gmail account and you will have to join Google+.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 18, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: October 15, 2015–December 1, 2015
Registration instructions: Students should visit the website of the Registrar's Office at Moravian College to submit a registration request no later than the end of the registration period. 
Registration contact: Lexi Smith, Institutional Registrar, or Julianne Greco, Registrar's Assistant, Moravian College, registrar@moravian.edu, (610) 861-1350.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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RELIGION
 
Pilgrimage: Searching for God in a (Post)modern World
 
We will study, reflect and act with respect to the (dis)connections between theology and culture, using “pilgrimage” as a case study. Students will be immersed in various examples of pilgrimage from diverse religions as well as secular examples, and will engage in their own pilgrimage experience as a part of their learning.
 
Instructor: Kelly Denton-Borhaug
Additional Details: This course is part of a pilot project to explore online courses in the humanities and will be organized according to an online format. Students will need to virtually attend a certain number of required “synchronous classes.” Information about access to the learning management software for this course will be send via email to enrolled students.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 18, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: There will be five “synchronous classes” throughout the semester: one at the beginning of the semester, one at the end near finals, and three interspersed in between. These will be important times for us to come together as a class for significant mutual learning opportunities. Please check the course description listed on the Moravian College website {link to come} for more information about the specific day/time these synchronous classes will occur. At the final synchronous class students will orally/virtually present their experience and analysis of their own pilgrimage experience to their peers and professor. Attendance at each synchronous class is required for the course.
 
Course registration period: October 15, 2015–December 1, 2015
Registration instructions: Students should visit the website of the Registrar's Office at Moravian College to submit a registration request no later than the end of the registration period. 
Registration contact: Lexi Smith, Institutional Registrar, or Julianne Greco, Registrar's Assistant, Moravian College, registrar@moravian.edu, (610) 861-1350.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
The Era of the American Revolution
 
The American Revolution is at the core of American identity, but the real Revolution is shrouded by myth, making it difficult for most Americans to truly understand this important historical event. Just how revolutionary was the Revolution? And for whom? In this course we will relive the difficult decision of choosing sides in an uncertain rebellion; we will evaluate the Revolution from political, social, and cultural standpoints; and lastly, we will analyze what the Revolution meant to Americans in the past and continues to signify today.
 
Instructor: Jonathan DeCoster
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor and about About the Department of History & Political Science at Otterbein University.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–April 25, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Offered entirely online, but students will be required to participate via computer in “synchronous” sessions at 8:00 a.m. Eastern Time on the following (provisional) dates:
  • January 27, 29
  • February 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19
  • March 17, 24, 31
Course registration period: March 15, 2015–December 1, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course. To register for this course, visit www.otterbein.edu/CICconsortium.
Registration contact: Mark Moffitt, Director, Adult & Transfer Enrollment Office, Otterbein University, mmoffitt@otterbein.edu, (614) 823-1108.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
“A Sermon and a Striptease”: 18th-Century British Literature
 
This course will sample the lively range of literary forms and themes in 18th-century Britain. We’ll explore at least one literary revolution in the growth of the British novel. Mapping the novel’s rise from scandal to respectability, we’ll identify its transformative literary traits: narrative immediacy, ordinary events, private experience, and readerly empathy and vicariousness. Frequently we’ll notice the dual tendency in 18th-century texts to both instruct and titillate (as our course title, borrowed from critic Ian Watt, suggests). We’ll read in a range of literary genres that feel alien (and often outrageous): satire, amatory fiction, travel narrative, graveyard poems, popular periodicals, true crime, ballad opera, verse epistle, and the gothic. The course will emphasize literary responses to historical events, particularly Britain’s New World contacts and the growth of empire and the transatlantic slave trade. We’ll ask how literary texts both shape and sometimes resist narratives of national identity.
 
Instructor: Margaret Koehler
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor and about the Department of English at Otterbein University.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–April 25, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Offered entirely online, but students will be required to “attend” three synchronous meetings on Tuesdays from 2:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. Eastern Time.
 
Course registration period: March 15, 2015–December 1, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course. To register for this course, visit www.otterbein.edu/CICconsortium.
Registration contact: Mark Moffitt, Director, Adult & Transfer Enrollment Office, Otterbein University, mmoffitt@otterbein.edu, (614) 823-1108.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
Capstone Seminar
 
English 490 serves as the culminating experience for English literature and writing majors. Students design and execute an original research project that aligns with rhetorical norms within the field of English Studies. The Department will host a virtual “Capstone Conference” to provide a venue for students to present their work akin to an academic conference.
 
Instructor: Emily Sallee
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 8, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Offered in a blended format, with students at a distance participating via synchronous web conference (times TBD).
 
Course registration period: October 19, 2015–December 31, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course. Specific registration instructions will be found at www.park.edu/cic-consortium-courses.
Registration contact: Melissa Geier, Registrar’s Office, Park University, mgeier@park.edu, (816) 584-6273.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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PHILOSOPHY
 
Morality and Freedom: Kant’s Ethics and Kantian Ethics
 
This course will consist of a close reading of Kant’s Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals and an examination of its central themes and arguments. It will also examine the contemporary descendants of Kant’s ethics—particularly the work of Christine Korsagaard and Barbara Herman.
 
Instructor: Adam Potthast
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 8, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Offered entirely online with optional synchronous meetings with the instructor and other course members in small groups.
 
Course registration period: October 19, 2015–December 31, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer transfer credit for this course. Specific registration instructions will be found at www.park.edu/cic-consortium-courses.
Registration contact: Melissa Geier, Registrar’s Office, Park University, mgeier@park.edu, (816) 584-6273.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
History of the American Family
 
This course will explore the functions of the institution, changes in the structure, size and character of the family, roles and relationships within the family and the institution of the family as a reflection of the broader social and historic trends in American culture and society. It will also consider methodologies and perspectives in American social and cultural history.
 
Instructor: Susan Ouellette
Additional Details: Learn more Aabout the instructor.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 20, 2016–May 4, 2016
Required real-time meetings: First meeting of the course on January 20, 2016, at 8:00 a.m. Eastern Time.
 
Course registration period: Priority registration will be November 1, 2015November 14, 2015.
Registration instructions: Saint Michael's College will offer transfer credit for this course. Registration can be completed via email by contacting David Barrowclough, Associate Registrar, at dbarrowclough@smcvt.edu.
Registration contact: David Barrowclough, Associate Registrar, Saint Michael’s College, dbarrowclough@smcvt.edu, (802) 654-2571.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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MUSICOLOGY/HISTORY
 
African American Spirituals and Gospel Song
 
This course takes a historical and analytical look at African American sacred song from the ring shout to holy hip-hop with an emphasis on the great body of nineteenth century spirituals and subsequent twentieth century development of gospel song – its composers, stars, and influence on popular forms including jazz, rock and soul. There is a strong listening and filmed component as well as the reading and interpretation of texts. Students become familiar with essential primary sources, both written and recorded, and maintain a class blog for the sharing of responses, perspectives, and experiences. Largely asynchronous and self-paced in design, the course will have the rare synchronous meeting time to accommodate talks by experts in the field. This course fulfills the Historical Studies LSC requirement. Prerequisite: none.
 
Instructor: William L. Ellis
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 20, 2016–May 4, 2016
Required real-time meetings: There will be 1-2 interactive talks with gospel music performers/scholars (TBA).
 
Course registration period: Priority registration will be November 1, 2015November 14, 2015.
Registration instructions: Saint Michael's College will offer transfer credit for this course. Registration can be completed via email by contacting David Barrowclough, Associate Registrar, at dbarrowclough@smcvt.edu.
Registration contact: David Barrowclough, Associate Registrar, Saint Michael’s College, dbarrowclough@smcvt.edu, (802) 654-2571.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ANTHROPOLOGY/RELIGION
 
Cultures of the Bible
ANTHROPOLOGY 255C Saint Vincent College (PA)
 
The people of the Bible lived in an environmental and cultural setting very different from that of modern times. Using a variety of frameworks and sources from archaeology and cultural anthropology, this course will examine how Biblical narratives take place within social, economic, political and ecological contexts of the ancient Middle East and surrounding areas. Students will apply a combination of archaeology and cultural anthropology to illuminate the lives and times of the Biblical eras. No prerequisites.
 
Instructor: Elaine M. Bennett
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor.
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–April 30, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: November 4, 2015–November 10, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer credit for the course. Fill out the registration form, then scan and return the form by email to gradadmission@stvincent.edu.
Registration contact: Amanda Gunther, Coordinator of Graduate and Continuing Education, Saint Vincent College, gradadmission@stvincent.edu, (724) 805-2933.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
Poetry of Response
 
In this advanced creative writing course, we will explore the phenomenon of poetic response. How, and why, do poets engage with other poets, texts, and art forms? What is “collaborative poetics,” and how pervasive is it today? Topics range from poetry and the visual arts (ekphrasis), to textual interrelationships (e.g., erasure), translation as collaboration (transnational/translingual exchanges), and adaptation and performance. Also, we will consider new digital perspectives to poetic collaboration and experiment with new online techniques for collaboration. Coursework includes weekly book-length readings, writing experiments, a collaborative online literary magazine project, and a final portfolio. Prerequisite: introductory or intermediate workshop course in creative writing.
 
Instructor: Michelle Gil-Montero
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor.
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–April 30, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: November 4, 2015–November 10, 2015
Registration instructions: The host institution will offer credit for the course. Fill out the registration form, then scan and return the form by email to gradadmission@stvincent.edu.
Registration contact: Amanda Gunther, Coordinator of Graduate and Continuing Education, Saint Vincent College, gradadmission@stvincent.edu, (724) 805-2933.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
Unpacking the Bookstore
 
This course explores the history and cultural functions of bookstores in the U.S. in order to understand better how they shaped, and continue to shape, public conceptions and meanings of “literature.” Students will analyze five significant bookstores that exemplify the issues the course raises and that invite important questions about readers as consumers, writers as products, and literature as an activity constituted not only by authors and texts, but also through commerce and within social space. Course assignments help students learn to write documentary stories through digital media using a WordPress blog platform.
 
Instructor: Laurence Roth
Additional Details: Learn more about the instructor. Visit the Unpacking the Bookstore website for examples of previous course projects.
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 18, 2016–April 30, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Students will be required to participate via computer in three synchronous discussions (dates and times TBD); if practicable, the class will also meet at a regional bookstore convenient to all participants.
 
Course registration period: October 2015
Registration instructions: Susquehanna University will offer transfer credit for this course. Registration will be handled by phone or email.
Registration contact: Please contact the Registrar’s Office at Susquehanna University at regoffice@susqu.edu or (570) 372-4109.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
History Methods
 
This course introduces participants to the practice of historical research. Each participant will use a set of primary sources to explore a historical topic. The course emphasizes critical reading and analysis of primary sources in the first seven weeks and readings of secondary literature about theory, methodology, and individual topics in the second seven weeks. The course moves beyond the traditional research paper format to feature digital humanities projects. Each participant will produce a digital presentation that interprets archival materials and considers historiographic discussions. By the end of the course, participants will know how to analyze primary sources, critique secondary sources, take useful research notes, cite sources properly, and present their findings effectively. A final aspect of the course is the development of a professional portfolio for history majors.
 
Instructor: Ed Slavishak
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 4 credit hours
Dates: January 18, 2016–April 27, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:35–2:15 p.m. Eastern Time.
 
Course registration period: October 2015
Registration instructions: Susquehanna University will offer transfer credit for this course. Registration will be handled by phone or email.
Registration contact: Please contact the Registrar’s Office at Susquehanna University at regoffice@susqu.edu or (570) 372-4109.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ART HISTORY/GENDER STUDIES
Women Artists: A Global Perspective
 
This course casts a wide net with regard to art created by women, including both applied and fine arts, as well as work deemed "arts and crafts," challenging received notions of what is "Art." Analyzing the subject thematically within the context of both Western and non-Western cultures contrasts with most courses on women artists, which are primarily taught chronologically and focus on painting and sculpture produced by women from the United States and Europe. We will study textiles made by the Kuna women of Panama, for example, together with those produced by female artists at the Bauhaus Weaving Workshop in Germany. We will pay special attention to works being created by women around the world today, particularly those that do not conform to contemporary Western notions of "Art," despite being highly collectible. Prerequisite: ARTH 115, ARTH 116, ARTH 117, or GNDR 102, or by permission of the instructor.
 
Instructor: Kimberly Morse Jones
Additional Details:
 
Credits/Units: 3 credits
Dates: January 18, 2016-April 29, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None
 
Course registration period: November 4, 2015-January 22, 2016
Registration instructions: Contact the Registrar's Office at registrar@sbc.edu for information.
Registration contact: Deborah Powell, Registrar, Sweet Briar College, registrar@sbc.edu, (434) 381-6179.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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GENDER STUDIES
 
A College of Their Own
 
Students will explore the character and value of their own single-sex and/or coed college experience in the context of gender theory. Using shared readings, independent research, field studies, and critical reflection, students will 1) examine the changing role of single-sex education in America; 2) scrutinize pedagogical and social aspects of the single-sex environment, such as its effect on communication, sports, traditions, dating, and work; 3) investigate how their single-sex college experience contributes to their perception of their own and others' sex and gender; and 4) consider current issues in single-sex education, such as the public perception of single-sex institutions, student's preparation for the mixed-gender workforce, and the inclusion of transgender and gender queer students in the student body. Throughout all, students will collaborate with peers on other campuses to consider how these norms and practices differ at women’s, men’s, and co-ed colleges. Prerequisites: One course in gender studies and permission of the instructor.
 
Instructor: Anthony Lilly
Additional Details:
 
Credits/Units: 3 credits
Dates: January 18, 2016-April 29, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Synchronous meetings via Google Hangouts on Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. Eastern Time.
 
Course registration period: November 4, 2015-January 22, 2016
Registration instructions: Contact the Registrar's Office at registrar@sbc.edu for information.
Registration contact: Deborah Powell, Registrar, Sweet Briar College, registrar@sbc.edu, (434) 381-6179.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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RUSSIAN
 
Intermediate Russian II
 
Please see description under RUS 201 at Connecticut College.
 
Instructors: Carol Any (Trinity College) and Andrea Lanoux (Connecticut College)
Additional Details: Not offered in Spring 2016, but students from Consortium member institutions are invited to enroll in this course in Fall 2015. Students (other than Trinity students) should enroll in RUS 202 at Connecticut College, which is the same course.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

 

RUSSIAN
 
Russian Culture and Civilization
 
An exploration of recurring themes in Russian culture through the examination of prose fiction, poetry, theater, film and the visual arts. Emphasis will be placed on canonical works to give students a foundation in the Russian tradition. Since cultural continuity needs to be studied in the context of cultural change, we will simultaneously do an overview of important moments in Russian history from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Students will write a paper every week about an aspect of Russian culture as it appears in the works we are examining. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 222 or permission of the instructor.
 
Instructor: Katherine Lahti
Additional Details: Not offered in Spring 2016, but students from Consortium member institutions are invited to enroll in this course in Fall 2015. Contact Prof. Lahti for more details.
 
Credits/Units: 3 credits
Dates: To be determined (Fall 2015)
Required real-time meetings: To be determined
 
Course registration period: Please contact Trinity College.
Registration instructions: Please contact the registrar's office at Trinity College to enroll in this course.
Registration contact: Patricia McGregor, Registrar, Trinity College, Patricia.McGregor@trincoll.edu, (860) 297-2118.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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HISTORY
 
Twentieth Century Europe: Reconciling the Paradox of Destruction and Promise
 
We will examine the major events, phenomena, and figures of Europe during the tumultuous 20th century. To help students reconcile the violence and destruction with the tremendous material and social advances that also characterize this period, we will study the complex interrelations between demographic change, cultural development, and political revolution, war, and reconstruction. Through role-play, discussions, and essays, students will critically analyze and reflectively evaluate the choices and constraints that confronted not only nations but communities, families, and individuals. Lastly, students will develop a “historical mindedness,” to include sensitivity to multiple causation, context, and the interplay of continuity and change in human affairs through study of historians’ methods and approaches. No prerequisites.
 
Instructor: Debra Workman
Additional Details: Learn more about the Department of History at the University of St. Francis.
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: Offered entirely online but students will be required to participate via computer in four “synchronous” sessions during the semester on Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. Central Time.
 
Course registration period: October 26, 2015–November 20, 2015
Registration instructions: The registrar at the home institution must inform the registrar at the University of St. Francis (USF) that one of their students intends to take this course. The registrar at USF will then enroll the student as a “USF special student,” a status that provides access to the online course. At the end of the course, the registrar at USF will inform the registrar at the home institution of the student’s grade.
Registration contact: Laura Koga, Registrar’s Office, University of St. Francis, lkoga@stfrancis.edu, (815) 740-3392.
 
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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PHILOSOPHY
 
Philosophy of War and Peace
 
This course is an introduction to understanding the stark contrast between the realities of war and peace through the prism of Just War Theory. This survey course will discuss the basic historical and situational problems, ethical and moral concepts, proponents and advocates, impediments and obstacles, ideals and objectives, and the overall existential vocabulary of war and peace. Issues and topics to be treated include the meaning and value of human life, the dignity of the human person, religious influences in war and peace, the understanding of death, human freedom, philosophy of good and evil, human solidarity, justice and international law, origins of historical and current conflicts, and the definition, history and application of Catholic Just War Tradition.
 
Instructor: Timothy Weldon
Additional Details: Learn more about the Department of Theology at the University of St. Francis.
 
Credits/Units: 3 credit hours
Dates: January 11, 2016–May 6, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None; offered entirely online.
 
Course registration period: October 26, 2015–November 20, 2015
Registration instructions: The registrar at the home institution must inform the registrar at the University of St. Francis (USF) that one of their students intends to take this course. The registrar at USF will then enroll the student as a “USF special student,” a status that provides access to the online course. At the end of the course, the registrar at USF will inform the registrar at the home institution of the student’s grade.
Registration contact: Laura Koga, Registrar’s Office, University of St. Francis, lkoga@stfrancis.edu, (815) 740-3392.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
Global Environmental Literature & Film
 
This class will explore the ways in which the relationship between humans and the natural world, as well as the ethical questions that arise from this relationship, are experienced, perceived, and represented in literary and film texts from around the world. In the course of the semester, we will engage a wide range of literary and film texts, including creation myths representing diverse perspectives on the place of human beings in the natural world; essays and other works from the past two centuries that reflect our evolving environmental consciousness; more recent texts that respond to the aftermath of nuclear catastrophes in Japan and Belarus; and contemporary writings that seek to recover, as well as re-imagine, our relationship with the natural world in the face of current environmental concerns.
 
Instructor: Joyce Boss
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 1 course credit/3.5 semester hours
Dates: January 5, 2016–April 15, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None
 
Course registration period: From April 1, 2015, until the start of the course (January 5, 2016).
Registration instructions: Please visit the registration page at www.wartburg.edu/registrar.
Registration contact: Sheree Covert, Registrar, Wartburg College, sheree.covert@wartburg.edu, (319) 352-8643.

**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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ENGLISH AND LITERATURE
 
Magic and Witchcraft in British Literature
 
From Merlin to Macbeth’s three witches to Harry Potter, magic and witchcraft have played crucial roles in the literatures of the British Isles. This course examines the literature and histories of magic and witchcraft in Britain from the Middle Ages to the present. Throughout the course, we will discuss how magic and witchcraft are depicted and develop through different times and cultural shifts. What is the difference between “magic” and “witchcraft?” Is it all down to gender? How do class, race, and religion also play into literary and historical accounts of magic? What’s so dangerous about it, and why is it such a compelling concept? Note: This course does not focus on religious or theological debates about the occult. Instead, it takes an analytical view of magic in literature and social history.
 
Instructor: Rachel Clark
Additional Details: 
 
Credits/Units: 1 course credit/3.5 semester hours
Dates: January 5, 2016–April 15, 2016
Required real-time meetings: None
 
Course registration period: From April 1, 2015, until the start of the course (January 5, 2016).
Registration instructions: Please visit the registration page at www.wartburg.edu/registrar.
Registration contact: Sheree Covert, Registrar, Wartburg College, sheree.covert@wartburg.edu, (319) 352-8643.
**Remember to review the registration requirements from your home institution as well.

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